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The Tracker


Price: $39.88 & FREE Shipping. Details
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Product Details

  • Actors: David Gulpilil, Gary Sweet, Damon Gameau, Grant Page, Noel Wilton
  • Directors: Rolf de Heer
  • Writers: Rolf de Heer
  • Producers: Rolf de Heer, Bridget Ikin, Domenico Procacci, Julie Ryan, Nils Erik Nielsen
  • Format: Color, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Art Mattan
  • DVD Release Date: September 27, 2005
  • Run Time: 90 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000A7Q2KA
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #175,707 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "The Tracker" on IMDb

Special Features

  • Special Feature:
  • Bonus documentary
  • Gulpilil: One Red Blood

Editorial Reviews

Featuring a mesmerizing and fearless performance from David Gulpilil (Walkabout, Rabbit-Proof Fence), THE TRACKER is at once a mystery, an adventure, and a pointed commentary on the atrocities committed against the Aborigines. In 1922, an Aboriginal tracker leads two mounted policeman and a civilian through the Australian Outback on the hunt for a black fugitive who is charged with killing a white woman. The group struggles through extremely rugged terrain inhabited by hostile aborigines, wild animals, and poisonous reptiles. Though treated as a virtual slave by the white men leading the search, it becomes clear that the Tracker has his own agenda. Through massacre and murder the party falls into disarray, stirring up questions of what is black and what is white and who is leading whom.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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See all 21 customer reviews
This film has an element of coolness that I like.
Glen F. Wilson
As they continue, the Follower is forced to choose between the intolerant racist ideology of the Fanatic and fair and broad minded views of the Tracker.
Cory D. Slipman
This is a film about his assignment as a tracker hired to find an Aborigine criminal.
Gerard D. Launay

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

47 of 47 people found the following review helpful By Brian E. Erland HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on October 29, 2005
Format: DVD
I have been a big fan of Australian movies since '71 when I first saw a very young aborigine named David Gulpilil in 'Walkabout' and have followed his film career ever since. He had a major role in one of my all-time favorite movies 'The Last Wave' in '79, made a very brief appearance at the beginning of 'The Right Stuff' in '83, a cameo in 'Crocodile Dundee' in '86, another cameo in 'Dead Heart' in '97 and then landed another major role in '02 in the highly acclaimed 'Rabbit-Proof Fence.'

Oddly enough David's signature role was filmed in the same year as 'Rabbit-Proof Fence.' I'm talking about a movie that is totally unknown the the U.S.A. but was awarded the 'Best Film' award and 'Best Actor' award for David by the Australian Film Critics Circle. The film is 'The Tracker.'

This is one of my favorite movies about the Australian aborigines. The year is 1922 and David, known only as 'the Tracker' is guiding three white officials through the outback in search of another aborigine accused of killing a white woman. During the journey 'the Tracker' is forced to endure not only derogatory treatment from the 'the Fanatic' in charge (Gary Sweet) but must witness in silence the arbitary killing of innocent aborigines encountered along way. As tensions continue to build 'the Tracker' quietly plans his revenge and in the end true justice, aboriginal justice, is dealt out.

David Gulpilil dominates this film, he's absolutely amazing! Every expression, every gesture is filled with understanding, rage and humor. This is in every way his movie. Saying that, I also want to make mention of the wonderful supporting role played by Damon Gamean as 'the Follower.' His inner journey of personal transformation is extraordinary and a perfect counterbalance to David.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Stephen A. Haines HALL OF FAME on March 24, 2007
Format: DVD
When Philip Noyce directed "Rabbit-proof Fence" - a film about Aborigine children escaping white captivity - he hired David Gulpilil in the role of the "black tracker". With forty thousand years of experience in the Australian bush under their belts [sic?], the Aborigines are trackers without peer. The European invaders quickly learned to use them in tracing missing children, criminals and other tasks. In the "Special Features" of "Rabbit-proof Fence", Noyce comments on his sudden awareness that Gulpilil virtually redefined the role. With no lines - none are needed - David makes clear that an Aborigine would find the children. But he "misses" them in passing, glancing over his shoulder to where they were hiding in the scrub. He presumed the real tracker sent after them had done something similar. In this film, David Gulpilil is the lead role, and clearly defines it in his own way. Even writer-director de Heer is unlikely have the savvy to devise a script to achieve what Gulpilil accomplishes here.

The story is of three whites, two of whom are policemen, to chase down an Aborigine murder suspect. The leader, a fanatic racist, is no exaggeration as Australian history has shown. The young policeman is an eager innocent, but flexible. To him it's part of a new job. The third white is a "squatter", conscripted to fill out the group. As "The Tracker", Gulpilil must lead them over a sparse landscape with few clues to the suspect's passage. The trail is scanty, the man elusive, and the whites are totally dependent on Gulpilil's abilities. In one scene, as the group arrives at the edge of a stony plain, the young policeman objects that there's no trail to follow. The expanse of pebbles is extensive and no sign of human passage can be made out.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Gerard D. Launay on January 10, 2006
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
It's impossible not to be a David Gulpilil fan...he can do no wrong in any film. He exudes an aboriginal dignity in the same way that Toshire Mifune exudes a samurai dignity. This is a film about his assignment as a tracker hired to find an Aborigine criminal. The film examines who is the criminal and who is the innocent...who has standing in the bush wilderness and who does not. A very interesting film and well worth purchasing.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Cory D. Slipman on September 15, 2006
Format: DVD
Rolf de Heer's outstanding film, "The Tracker" is a visually stunning odyssey through the remote, unforgiving Australian bush and liberally filled with social commentary.

The year is 1922 and a band of three mounted policeman is being lead by an aboriginal known as The Tracker, played by David Gulpilil. They are following another native Australian accused of murdering a white woman. The band is lead by The Fanatic played by Gary Sweet, a murderous bigoted Australian, who thinks of native Aboriginals as subhuman. Along the trail he displays his ruthlessness by shooting innocent blacks the group come across. Also along for the ride is a young naive Damon Gameau whose morality has yet to be corrupted towards racial inequality.

As the group move deeper and deeper into Aboriginal territory and away from civilization, The Tracker who is chained by the Fanatic like a dog, begins to follow his own agenda within the pursuit. As they continue, the Follower is forced to choose between the intolerant racist ideology of the Fanatic and fair and broad minded views of the Tracker.

Rolf de Heers brilliant depiction of the despicable racism evidenced in Australia at that time serves as a reminder that the dehumanization of anyone regardless of their differences cannot be condoned.
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