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The Trading Game Hardcover – March 1, 1990


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Hardcover, March 1, 1990
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 9 and up
  • Hardcover: 200 pages
  • Publisher: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 1st edition (March 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0397323972
  • ISBN-13: 978-0397323975
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.6 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,151,407 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 4-6-- Andy Harris' baseball-card collection, inherited from his recently deceased father, contains some valuable items, including a 1952 Mickey Mantle card worth $2500. He's willing, however, to trade Mantle for a 25-cent card that pictures his grandfather, Jim "Ace 459" Harris, whom Andy idolizes. Grampa doesn't care much about old baseball cards--"paper heroes" he calls them. It's not until Grampa coaches Andy that he learns why the relationship between his father and grandfather was strained; Grampa demands that his players "play to win," something Andy's father wasn't tough enough to do and something Andy can't do at the expense of friendship. In addition to the trading and stealing involved in acquiring the card, the story tries to address issues of father/son relationships, including the divorce, remarriage, and death of Andy's father, and the grandfather's upcoming medical test. The plot gets bogged down by these issues, using many flashbacks and one awkward recapping of a crucial scene during which Andy (who narrates the rest of the book) is absent. Lightly veiled hints about the "win at all costs" nature of Grampa's coaching appear throughout the story, but Andy simply doesn't see them. Most of the sports action is confined to playing catch with Grampa and one climactic practice; the card collecting may appeal only to to die-hard baseball fans who will recognize players from the past and contemporary stars. --Susan Schuller, Milwaukee Public Library
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc.

About the Author

Alfred Slote is the author of over thirty books, most of them for young people. He lives in Ann Arbor, Michigan. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on January 29, 2002
Format: Hardcover
The book The Trading Game by Alfred Sloate is a good book in my opinion. The Genre of this book is General Fiction. This book is mainly about an eleven year-old boy, Andy, who's grandfather comes to town for some medical testing. With him he brings Andy's dad's old baseball cards from when Andy's dad was Andy's age. His dad had many baseball cards and he has some worth thousands of dollars. Andy will do anything to get his grandfather's card because his grandfather was in the major leagues and Andy looks up to him. Even if that means trading one of hia cards worth thousands, Then his grandfather decides to go to one of Andy's baseball practices and give them tips and just help out, Andy is very excited but one thing changes everything that Andy was warned about and. I think this book is very good and I would recommend this book anyone who likes fiction sports books.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 9, 1998
Format: Paperback
Eleven-year-old Andy Harris is a wonderful boy in every sense of the word. One can't help but admire his love of baseball and collecting cards, but what we really admire is his true love for his grandfather. His personal struggle between the two is admirable and touching. The ending is tremendously strong. One of the best books I have read in a while. Nice job, Alfred!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 27, 1999
Format: Paperback
Andy Harris's grandfather, Jim Harris played for the Detroit Tigers, and there was only one card made of him. After his father died, the 10,850 dollar card collection becomes a THING in the family. Andy tries to trade cards out of it to get his grandpa's card, but his "game plan" doesn't work, since his mother won't let him. Find out how Andy gets Jim Harris's card in this fascanating book!
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