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The Trail of Tears Hardcover – August 6, 1995


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 356 pages
  • Publisher: Wings (August 6, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0517146770
  • ISBN-13: 978-0517146774
  • Product Dimensions: 7.3 x 5.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #554,782 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

Insightful, rarely told history of Indian courage in the face of White expansionism in the 19th century. Truth-telling tale of the ruthless brutality that forced the Native American population into resettlement camps and reservations, with a look at the few white Americans who fought to help them.

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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See all 35 customer reviews
A very human book.
Kyle Yarber
This was a very good book about the trials and tribulations that the indian people endured at the hands of the white man.
Benny
I consider this a "must read" type of book.
Rachel Elaine

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

94 of 97 people found the following review helpful By Edward Bosnar on November 2, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Jahoda's "Trail of Tears" is a good companion to Dee Brown's "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" - in fact, Brown basically picks up where Jahoda leaves off both chronologically and geographically. Although hardly comprehensive (such an account of the Indian removals east of the Mississipi would require many volumes), Jahoda nonetheless provides a rather exhaustive review of the removal of the "five civilized tribes" as well as a number of midwestern peoples. Jahoda notes the particular senselessness of 'removing' the eastern tribes, as many had already been integrated into the lifestyle of the American settlers (some even became major plantation owners, complete with slaves) and/or became devout Christians. What comes out here is that it was not a matter of dealing with 'savages' but racism, plain and simple. Needless to say, "Trail of Tears" is not only an illuminating history but also a rather instructive text.
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58 of 59 people found the following review helpful By Kyle Yarber on March 9, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This is an amazing book. Tireless research and the author's gift of vision and words produces a magnificently readable narrative of the American Indian Removals. Very balanced with no point of view overlooked. Many surprising appearances. And plenty of twists which will make you laugh outloud and break your heart. A very human book. An absolute must-read for anyone who wants to learn history as through the eyes and ears (and hearts) of those experiencing it. You won't be able to put it down.
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60 of 64 people found the following review helpful By Ronald Brown on May 21, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I read this book right after Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee. Together they tell the sad tale of how the original inhabitants of the US were moved from their original lands to make way for the US movement west. I enjoyed this book a little more than Bury My Heart, I felt like I got to know some of the characters a little better in this one. But both are worth reading for anyone interested in this sad chapter of US history.
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 30, 1998
Format: Hardcover
A moving history of the Eastern Native Americans up to their removal to the West. Jahoda covers most of major tribes in the East. A history that should make any American ashamed and outraged. Jahoda's writing and story telling is excellent and moves one to tears.
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26 of 29 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 7, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This book tells the sad story of what happened to Native Americans (a case of genocide) in a very readable format. It is also very educational and should be mandatory for American History classes.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Scott Walker on October 31, 2006
Format: Hardcover
"Father--you know it's hard to be hungry, and if you do not know it we poor Indians know it... We did not think the Big Man would tell us things that was not true." --The Delaware Chiefs to the Indian Department

Horrific--sad times in U.S. history. Eloquent writing style, with beautiful observations of nature and the Indians exotic rituals. Powerful, moving, disheartening, and wretched tale of the American Indian extrication from the east to the west, with the insertion of eye witness reports. Extensive references and bibliography.

Gloria brings in some history of the early settlers. The Red Eagle incident was the catalyst, bringing in the gradual manipulation and removal of the native tribes. Because the Indians weren't united, the removal and relocation was made easier. The exile to their new lands were wrought with strife and death with little morose by the military. The white man's fire water reeked tremendous havoc. The false promises--deception; the warring among tribes contributed to the extermination.

The story of the Black Hawk war in Wisconsin is particularly interesting and heart wrenching. When I now hear the Indian names of Wisconsin it will be with somber reflection.

"They [white man] valued possessions and used people; Indians value people and used possessions." --Seminoles

Wish you well

Scott
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Rachel Elaine on October 6, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
"The Trail of Tears: The Story of The American Indian Removals, 1813-1855" is a painfully honest, detailed and unbiased reporting of events mostly omitted from school history textbooks and other mainstream sources.

Author, Gloria Jahoda combines inexhaustible research, bringing prominent figures in history to life, with beautiful and sometimes poetic writing to an important and educational book that reads like a fast-paced, succulent novel.

Unless one has extensive prior knowledge in this sordid chapter of American history already, it is guaranteed to provoke outrage. This holocaust is shocking, horrifying and sad in the re-telling and the fact that it is still seemingly swept under the rug by too many, even today.

"The Trail of Tears" is but hardly a beginning in the woes that actually besieged the true Natives of America, but Gloria Jahoda had done wonders in condensing 42 years of brutality, revolting attitudes and devious measures in swindling land and then "removing" the then eastern tribes of Native American Indians (Senecas, Delawares, Shawnees, Choctaws, Sacs, Creeks, Foxes, Cherokee, Chickasaws, Mandans, Potawatomis, Seminoles and Chippewas among others) to what was then considered an uninhabitable, foreign and barren desert land of the west by a government intent on merchandising and stripping ancestral homes, sacred grounds and lands, along with human rights while claiming justification in their systematic plans, blinded by greed.

There is mention of the notable ones with a conscious, not caught up in the misguided, ungodly and unjustly actions ("...the treaty is indeed a thing as illegal as possible...It seems to me that if the government has not decided to be completely unjust, they [the Indians] will be listened to....
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