Qty:1
  • List Price: $27.50
  • Save: $1.37 (5%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 13 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Treasures of Darkness... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: MINOR WEAR TO COVER/DUST COVER. In a good to very good condition. A copy that has been read, but remains in clean condition. All pages are intact, and the cover is intact (including dust cover, if applicable). The spine may show signs of wear. Pages can include limited notes and highlighting, and the copy can include "From the library of" labels. Shipping within 24 hours Monday-Friday. If you are not 100% satisfied with your purchase, please contact Ivy League Books directly before leaving neutral or negative feedback to give us an opportunity to rectify the situation.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $2.00
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Treasures of Darkness: A History of Mesopotamian Religion Paperback – September 10, 1978

ISBN-13: 978-0300022919 ISBN-10: 0300022913 Edition: New edition

Buy New
Price: $26.13
27 New from $19.07 29 Used from $7.15
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$26.13
$19.07 $7.15
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Check out The Amazon Book Review, our editors' fresh new blog featuring interviews with authors, book reviews, quirky essays on book trends, and regular columns by our editors. Explore now
$26.13 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 13 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Treasures of Darkness: A History of Mesopotamian Religion + Conceptions of God in Ancient Egypt: The One and the Many + Religion in Ancient Egypt: Gods, Myths, and Personal Practice
Price for all three: $66.04

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 273 pages
  • Publisher: Yale University Press; New edition edition (September 10, 1978)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0300022913
  • ISBN-13: 978-0300022919
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6.5 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #372,853 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
57%
4 star
29%
3 star
14%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 7 customer reviews
He has a vivid writing style and approaches each new subject without so much as a hint of Ethnocentrism.
Enkireigns@aol.com
Overall, however, this is an excellent text, and one that will give great reading pleasure and considerable insight to the reader.
FrKurt Messick
In the former "great existential myths and epics" man took stock of himself and considered his place in the universe.
Akinaw Bulcha

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

75 of 75 people found the following review helpful By Arch Llewellyn on December 11, 2001
Format: Paperback
Jacobsen is a giant in his field, but as an introduction to the subject "Treasures of Darkness" can be heavy going. Most helpful to me was the way that he tackles the myths chronologically, starting the book with the Dumuzi cults recored in the earliest Sumerian sources and ending with the stories of Marduk and Gilgamesh from later records. In between he covers topics from the rise of kingship to the growth of personal religion in a way that makes the beliefs come alive as an evolving response to the world rather than an inert collection of tablets.
Jacobsen has a tendency to present speculation as fact--you wouldn't guess from reading this alone that many of his points are disputed--and the translations are a little stilted, at least to my ears. But his book goes a long way to turning the fragmentary evidence into a coherent philosophy of nature, humanity and the gods. Mesopotamian religion is often described as pessimistic; Jacobsen restores some of the awe, love and splendor that might have made it a convincing world view for thousands of people we'll never otherwise know.
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
69 of 72 people found the following review helpful By FrKurt Messick HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on July 21, 2003
Format: Paperback
The book 'Treasures of Darkness: A History of Mesopotamian Religion' by Thorkild Jacobsen is a text used by courses in my seminary and others to provide a background to religious feeling and development over a long stretch of human history -- nearly three thousand years. Whether one accepts that the patriarchs of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob are real historical figures or not, no one can plausibly deny that the religious development of the peoples of Canaan (and indeed of all the ancient world around the eastern Mediterranean to the Indus river) were affected by the cultural and religious developments in Mesopotamia, the centre of the region, and a fertile region second to none known in the world, on a par with the Nile, around which another major civilisation arose.
This is a text of history of Mesopotamia in its own right. By the time history gets back this far, the lines become very blurred, rather like parallel lines intersecting on the horizon. Literature, religion, archaeology, sociology, psychology -- all of these disciplines become intertwined in Jacobsen's text as he looks at Sumerian society.
The book is organised with an introduction, then according to time divisions of fourth, third, and second millennia, then concludes with an epilogue into the first millennium, during which the Bible as we know it (and most ancient history such as is commonly known occurred) came to be.
Ancient Mesopotamian Religion: The Terms
The first chapter introduces basic concepts for doing religious studies of any historical era, as well as those specific to this text. Key concepts such as understanding the numinous, the confrontation with power not of this world, the use of metaphor and the importance and limitations on literalness are explored.
Read more ›
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Akinaw Bulcha on March 23, 2006
Format: Paperback
I. Author, Title, Publication Data.

As an introduction to Mesopotamian religions, Thorkild Jacobsen's Treasure of Darkness: A History of Mesopotamian Religion is exemplary primarily because of the author's background as an expert in the fields of Oriental philology and archeology. The book is full of prime source texts throughout, some of which are Jacobsen's own updated translations. Reading this as a student has been a broadening experience. This is due the fact that less is taken for granted because of the unusual amount of Semitic texts included. A fuller appraisal of the strengths and weaknesses of this work shall be noted in its proper place after a full assessment of the material has been given.

II. Assessment: Content and Methodology.

(a) Content and Methodology.

Treasures of Darkness is ordered logically on a chronological pane and in addition to the religions themselves, it touches upon weighty issues of historical methodology in each successive section. Jacobsen starts with the fourth millennium, and each section thereafter deals with a successive millennium and its representative metaphors. According to Jacobsen, the metaphors are as follows: (1) the fourth millennium is represented by the Provider metaphor; (2) the third millennium with the Ruler metaphor; (3) the Second with a Parent metaphor alongside the Creation and Gilgamesh epics; (4) lastly, the first millennium with Warrior-King and Hero metaphors.

Before delving into the particulars of each epoch, he commences his treatment of the ancient Mesopotamian religions by identifying and clearly defining the terms "religion", "Mesopotamian" and "Ancient".
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By laura morrow on April 6, 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Everything was fine.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
The Treasures of Darkness: A History of Mesopotamian Religion
This item: The Treasures of Darkness: A History of Mesopotamian Religion
Price: $27.50 $26.13
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com