Customer Reviews


166 Reviews
5 star:
 (101)
4 star:
 (32)
3 star:
 (14)
2 star:
 (7)
1 star:
 (12)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


33 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unexpectedly different mystery comedy from the Master
Hitchcock was hardly a one-note director. He functioned in a variety of modes, and while the various films he made possessed a family resemblance to one another, they are not monolithically the same. If one only allows him or herself to enjoy the out-and-out suspense films like NORTH BY NORTHWEST or STRANGERS ON A TRAIN, this could very possibly be a film that will not...
Published on October 6, 2002 by Robert Moore

versus
13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Trouble with the DVD
The transfer itself is pretty great, although they could have managed to touch up a few pretty obvious scratches. The film itself is funny, made more so by the knowledge the viewer has that Hitch is pulling the strings. But John Forsythe's lead performance and some weak early scenes involving him and Shirley MacLaine keep it from being one of the master's strongest...
Published on May 22, 2001 by jockomonticello


‹ Previous | 1 217 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

33 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unexpectedly different mystery comedy from the Master, October 6, 2002
This review is from: The Trouble with Harry (DVD)
Hitchcock was hardly a one-note director. He functioned in a variety of modes, and while the various films he made possessed a family resemblance to one another, they are not monolithically the same. If one only allows him or herself to enjoy the out-and-out suspense films like NORTH BY NORTHWEST or STRANGERS ON A TRAIN, this could very possibly be a film that will not bring pleasure or enjoyment. But if, instead, the viewer is able to be open to something a little bit different, this film can be a source of unexpected delight.

I first saw this film as part of the revival of the "Five Missing Hitchcock" Films in the early 1980s, the others being THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH (the Jimmy Stewart version), REAR WINDOW, ROPE, and VERTIGO. While VERTIGO and REAR WINDOW were the two films causing the biggest stir, I was pleasantly surprised by THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY. Hitchcock has always vacillated between comedy and suspense, with some films containing more, and others less, of the former. Except for MR. AND MRS. SMITH, however, this film comes the closest of any of his films to pure comedy.

The trouble with Harry, of course, is that he is dead and won't stay buried. The other trouble is that a vast number of individuals may have had a motive for killing him. But how and why he died is decidedly unimportant. Instead, his corpse provides the basis for a series of mildly complicated situations, as his body is shifted and moved and brooded over.
This movie was the extraordinarily cute Shirley MacLaine's film debut, and she is enormously fetching in it. John Forsythe plays the male lead, but the woodenness of his performance mars his performance somewhat (for the uninitiated, he later was the voice of "Charlie" on CHARLIE'S ANGELS). Several reviewers have noted the presence of the Beaver, Jerry Mathers. Edmund Gwenn, who as he often does, nearly steals the film as Captain Wiles, appears here in his first Hitchcock film since portraying incongruously but magnificently an assassin in FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT in 1940.

Hitchcock filmed THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY on location in Vermont, the most recognizable shots being in one of my favorite towns in America: Craftsbury. I have stayed in inns in Craftsbury on three separate occasions during the fall foliage season (this film was shot with the leaves changing), and I can testify that it is every bit as lovely, albeit a touch more developed, as it appears in this film.

By the way, I'm in love with Harry's tie. The fifties was probably the best decade for ties, with wonderful designs.

This film isn't for everyone, but if you are willing to be flexible, and not be disappointed when this turns out not to be REBECCA or THE BIRDS, then I think most viewers will find a great deal to enjoy and smile about.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I'm the 11-year old Below, December 19, 2000
By 
THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY is a morbid [dark] comedy, full of witty dialogue and offbeat performances. It is a masterpiece of dreary atmosphere(set in a beautiful fall country setting)and wonderful realization. It is endearing and feel-good, morbid and dark, and funny yet subtle, too. Alfred Hitchcock does good with this film. Edmund Gwenn is perfect, John Forsythe is intelligent, Mildred Natwick is endearing, Shirley Maclaine is wonderfully offbeat, Jerry Mathers is cute, and Mildred Dunnock is marvelously bland. The soundtrack is very whimsical and sets the mood perfectly. I recommend it to everyone. Also, if you can get hold of the novel of the same name by J. Trevor Story, it is excellent also with many funny additions.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Life, death, sex and lots of laughs, August 17, 2000
By 
Hitchcock was always funny, even in his darkest and most suspenseful films, but in this movie he decided to pursue all the comic possibilities lurking in what could have been a horror scenario: a corpse that won't stay buried, feelings of terrible guilt, innocent people falsely incriminated, the usual Hitchcock bag of tricks except that here it's all played for laughs. Something else worth mentioning is that without a single nude scene or crude word, this film manages to be sexier and more outrageous than anything on the screen in this free-and-easy era when film-makers keep trying to one-up eachother with outrageous shock effects. Some of the double-entendres make you laugh with sheer disbelief that they ever got past the censors. At the risk of spoiling a great laugh line, I have to mention one -- "She's a well preserved woman, and preserves have to be opened sometime!"
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars delicious Hitchcock black comedy, July 27, 2002
By 
Byron Kolln (the corner where Broadway meets Hollywood) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Trouble with Harry (DVD)
THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY was a radical departure for Hitchcock, and proved to be a lukewarm success with audiences. Upon re-examination, we can see some of the magic that Hitchcock was trying to achieve with this delicious black comedy.
Set in the colorful expanse of New England in the glowing hues of autumn, the story is about the troublesome corpse, Harry. Everyone in the sleepy locale believes that he or she may have had a hand in bringing about his demise, but no-one really cares what happens to him. His nonchalant wife (Shirley MacLaine) is already flirting with the handsome artist (John Forsythe) and the rest of the "suspects" also have more important things on their minds. But Harry has a way of popping up...in the most improper of places and circumstances!
Shirley MacLaine made her auspicious film debut inn the role of Harry's wife (after being spotted subbing for Carol Haney in a performance of Broadway's "The Pajama Game"). Her performance shows what greatness was to follow (acclaimed, award-winning and nominated performances in THE TURNING POINT, TERMS OF ENDEARMENT, STEEL MAGNOLIAS, IRMA LA DOUCE and THE APARTMENT).
Mildred Natwick and Edmund Gwenn, as the older lovers, are fantastic and give sly, comedic performances. The film also featuresc a pre-"Leave It To Beaver" Jerry Mathers.
The DVD includes the featurette "The Trouble with Harry Isn't Over", the trailer and art gallery.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Offbeat but wonderful Hitchcock, November 26, 2000
Shot in a blaze of Autumn colors in Barre and Craftsbury Common Vermont, "Harry" is Hitchcock's black comedy. The story opens with young Arnie Rogers ("The Beaver" Jerry Mathers) discovering a corpse lying in a open field. He runs home tells his air-head mother Jennifer (Shirley MacLaine) what he found. Jennifer thinks she did Harry in, but so does Captain Wiles (Edmund Gwenn) and Ivy Gravely (Mildred Natwick) and as a result, Harry gets buried and dug up so many times we lose track. The film is about how these diffident denizens of a small Vermont town relate, gradually revealing more and more about themselves. The dialog is wonderful, but you have to like films that move slowly with lots of conversation, if you do, you will love "Harry." The photography is magnificent, the beauty of Vermont pours through. Vermont still looks just like it did when "Harry" was filmed, fantastic.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a masterpiece..., February 1, 2002
By 
My favorite of Hitch's films and one of my all-time favorites. Made the year I was born (1955), Harry endeared himself to me upon my very first viewing. From the delightful characters to the gorgeous Vermont scenery, Harry is a true classic. I cannot think of a more enjoyable film. If you have not seen Harry, you owe it to yourself to do so: it is a treat.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Trouble with the DVD, May 22, 2001
This review is from: The Trouble with Harry (DVD)
The transfer itself is pretty great, although they could have managed to touch up a few pretty obvious scratches. The film itself is funny, made more so by the knowledge the viewer has that Hitch is pulling the strings. But John Forsythe's lead performance and some weak early scenes involving him and Shirley MacLaine keep it from being one of the master's strongest outings (which of course still makes it superior to most). My real problem with the DVD are the extras. They just seem sloppy and tossed together. The "theatrical trailer" is actually a bad circa 85 ad for the MCA release of the VHS with the most cheesy voiceover. The recommendations section includes a listing for "The Torn Curtain". And the documentary is put together in such a slipshod manner that it mentions Edmund Gwynn once, and only in passing, to say that it was a good cast. Wondering about Mildred Natwick? You won't get any information here -- she doesn't even merit a mention in the Cast and Filmmakers section. In fact, more time is spent on the actor who "played" Harry rather than any other actor save Forsythe and MacLaine. And, by the way, what's Shirley MacLaine doing that's so important that she can't sit down for an interview? The only real positive about the doc is that it devotes a section to Bernard Herrmann.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not Lesser Hitchcock, Just Unusually Comic with a Likeable Cast, July 18, 2008
This review is from: The Trouble with Harry (DVD)
I never thought it fair that this 1955 black comedy was labeled "lesser Hitchcock". Granted it is "atypical Hitchcock" given its light touch and lack of threatening violence (save for three gunshots heard at the beginning), but master filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock has made other movies far more out of his oeuvre like the sparkling 1941 Carole Lombard-Robert Montgomery romantic comedy, Mr. & Mrs. Smith. At least this one hews closer to his macabre sense of humor as it revolves around what to do with a persistent corpse, the body of Harry Worp. First, a freckle-faced little boy named Arnie comes upon it, and then the rabbit-hunting Captain Wiles discovers it and thinks he carelessly shot Harry. The aptly named Miss Gravely, a homely spinster, sees Wiles drag the body and simply invites him for tea with romantic aspirations on her mind. She confesses she thinks she killed Harry with the heel of a hiking boot. Arnie's mother Jennifer Rogers sees the body, and the young widow twice over also recognizes Harry and also thinks he killed him but with a bottle.

Caught in the middle is eccentric artist Sam Marlowe, who nonchalantly helps his friends dispose of the body. Just how Harry died is the MacGuffin around which Hitchcock hinges his entire plot. With a perceptive screenplay by John Michael Hayes (Rear Window) based on a popular post-WWII British novel by Jack Trevor Story, the quaintly whimsical tone is what surprises most Hitchcock aficionados here, but the dialogue is also laced with not-so-subtle sexual innuendo. The combination proves effective on its own terms though not particularly transcendent as a memorable piece of filmmaking. The charming performances help considerably starting with John Forsythe, long before his Aaron Spelling years on Charlie's Angels and Dynasty, as Sam. He has definite chemistry with twenty-year-old Shirley MacLaine in her film debut. As Jennifer, she emerges with her gamine screen persona almost fully formed, and it's no wonder she continues to work in front of the camera over a half-century later.

Edmund Gwenn (memorable as Kris Kringle in Miracle on 34th Street) and Mildred Natwick play Wiles and Miss Gravely with pixilated cunning. That is indeed six-year-old Jerry Mathers as Arnie a couple of years before starting his six-year run on Leave It to Beaver. A couple of behind-the-scenes aspects are worth noting - Robert Burks' superb cinematography capturing the colorful autumnal glory of New England and Bernard Herrmann's rhythmic soundtrack, his first of several classic scores for Hitchcock. Presenting a pristine print of the film, the 2006 DVD provides one other significant extra, an original half-hour documentary, Laurent Bouzereau's "The Trouble With Harry Isn't Over", featuring interviews with Forsythe, Hayes, associate producer Herbert Coleman, and Hitchcock's daughter Pat Hitchcock O'Connell. It's an insightful piece about the production complications and idiosyncratic casting like the producers taking a chance on MacLaine. Along with the original theatrical trailer, there is also a 38-still production gallery as well as about five pages of production notes.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Sunny Side of Hitchcock, April 2, 2008
This review is from: The Trouble with Harry (DVD)
I actually saw this movie when it first came out but all I remembered was that there was this really talented, sort of off-beat young actress in it whom I thought would go far (Shirley MacLaine!), an "older guy" (John Forsythe) beautiful autumn colors and something about a lot of digging. I couldn't remember the title and I don't think I identified it with Hitchcock. Over the years I would occasionally think of the film and wonder what is was. So, it was with great delight that I found it again recently, on the library shelf and I was very happy that I enjoyed it as much this time as the first!

Yes, it is Hitchcock but in a totally different mode than the dark suspenseful ones he's associated with. I found the whole film delightful to re-see and enjoyed every moment. The Hitchcock humor is there, although I certainly would not call it "dark" as others have. Yes, MacLaine was fresh and full of charm, as I had recalled. (She did go far!) John Forsythe did seem a bit old for her and not quite as wonderful as the rest of the cast, but he held his own. Edmund Gwynn is totally adorable, sort of a Hitchcock clone, with his fat belly and sweet disposition. Mildred Natwick is perfect, too, as the spinster with her eye on Gwynn.

The Vermont countryside at the height of its Autumn show plays a major part in the film, (even though they had to leave and film half of it back in California.) The golden light and spectacular colors as well as the immaculate white frame houses give a lightheartedness to the movie that adds an important dimension to the tale. It's the justaposition of the sweetnes and lightness of the village scene with the terrible tragedy of finding a dead body in the woods that one might have killed that gives the film its peculiar humor. It is taken from an English novel and I think it almost might have been better if it had not been transposed to America. However Hitchcock a transplanted Brit, himself, pulls it off.

I think The Trouble with Harry is totally charming and should be considered on a par with many of Hitchcock's more highly rated films.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Double Bed, November 7, 2001
This review is from: The Trouble with Harry (DVD)
-Instructions: Bury Harry and dig him up three times. Then you will see how much trouble he can be.-
-Alfred Hitchcock, as shown through his endless cameo appearances, had a whimsically sly side to his talent. Usually, I allow some time to pass before reviewing a film, so through the test of time I can tell how effective and enduring a film remains. Since I enjoyed The Trouble With Harry so much, I would rather review it while its fresh on my mind.-
-What would you do if one day, after a series of circumstances, you believed that you had somehow accidentally killed someone. To make matters worse people start showing up, and don't seem to care. In the back of your mind you wonder if they will use what they have seen against you, or if they had seen anything at all. Confused?-
-How can a dead body weave between the lives of four normal people that all believe they had a participated in a murder in different ways? What follows is a light hearted film that is quite honestly one of the more enjoyable Hitchcock's.-
-Just to sum up the situation: An old scooner captain believes he has shot Harry with a rifle while rabbit hunting. An artist (who quickly becomes the main character) helps the captain bury the body. Right before they stick him in the ground they hide and witness a woman (young Shirly McClain) seem almost excited that Harry is dead. After Harry is in the ground the two men set off after her to find out whether or not she knew him. Soon after this, another cog get's thrown in the wheel as another woman announces that she believe's she had killed him, by hitting him in the head with the heal of her shoe. McClain is found to be Harry's wife and suspicion is drawn to her. Then there is the blasted closet door that keeps opening by its self...!-
-Whodunit indeed!-
-It's worth checking out. Lot's of fun, and genuinely hitchcock.-
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 217 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

The Trouble with Harry
The Trouble with Harry by Alfred Hitchcock (DVD - 2006)
$19.98 $14.99
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.