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The Trouble With Black Boys: ...And Other Reflections on Race, Equity, and the Future of Public Education Hardcover

ISBN-13: 978-0787988746 ISBN-10: 078798874X Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Jossey-Bass; 1 edition (March 28, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 078798874X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0787988746
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.4 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #304,450 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Influenced by culture and aware of the lack of prospects for them, black boys in particular, but minority students of all kinds, make the kinds of poor choices that fulfill the low expectations of their teachers and the broader society. Education professor Noguera examines the cultural, societal—and personal—factors that create the stubborn link between race and poverty. In this compelling series of essays, Noguera cites research and his own personal experience—as a minority, a father, and an educator—to explore the myriad ways that young black and Hispanic males are expected to run afoul of middle-class American norms and often do. He argues that public schools, despite their abysmal record, are the only institutions with the access and resources to turn around troubling social trends. He points to research comparing the disciplinary tactics of public schools and prisons, institutions that have far too much in common with so many male minority students dropping out of schools and landing in prison. A thoughtful look at issues of race and educational equity. --Vanessa Bush

Review

Influenced by culture and aware of the lack of prospects for them,black boys in particular, but minority students of all kinds, make the kinds of poor choices that fulfill the low expectations of their teachers and the broader society. Education professor Noguera examinesthe cultural, societal--and personal--factors that create the stubborn link between race and poverty. In this compelling series of essays, Noguera cites research and his own personal experience--as a minority, a father, and an educator--to explore the myriad ways that young black and Hispanic males are expected to run afoul of middle-class American norms and often do. He argues that public schools, despite their abysmal record, are the only institutions with the access and resources to turn around troubling social trends. He points to research comparing the disciplinary tactics of public schools and prisons, institutions that have far too much in common with so many male minority students dropping out of schools and landing in prison. A thoughtful look at issues of race and educational equity.—Vanessa Bush (Booklist Review, May 8, 2008)

“Explores strategies that can change the culture and structure of schools to support the aspirations and identities of minority students.”—N.N. Arnez, emeritus, Howard University Recommended


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By C. Martinez on December 8, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As a teacher at a continuation high school, I connected intensely with the realities and considerations Noguera presents in this book. He articulates the reality of Black and Latino youth in Berkeley schools, which resembles that of such youth in many other urban districts in America, without over-assuming or sensationalizing the issues. Confronted with conflicting images and perspectives on what they should become in life, these youth are caught in a conundrum. He addresses culture, social structures and educational agendas as he calls for schools to assume responsibility for ALL students' academic outcomes rather than expecting failure as an inevitable end for many.

Noguera demonstrates that the implications of this so-called "trouble" are far-reaching, including when he honestly shares the story of his son Joaquin. I especially appreciate his unique take on the issues as an accomplished academic, a former school board member and a parent. Overall, Noguera's passion is undeniable as he gives a voice to the voiceless in urban America.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Curtis F. Lawrence Jr. on April 9, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Dr. Pedro Noguera is excellent. I have met him personally and have heard him speak several times. It is often difficult to take notes on the things he is saying on the impact of racism on Boys of color. This book captures all of that, so I now have all of the information at my fingertips. As a former Assistant Principal of an all-boys public high school in the Bronx, NY, I can appreciate this book.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By M. Escobar on October 30, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This is a great book- in fact our Assistant Superintendent is using it this year for a book study with our Secondary (Middle & High School) Principals.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By TRS0722 on June 1, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Good easy read. I was hoping to learn something new from this book but sadly did not. The author is intelligent and knowledgeable but I found him repeating many of the same things, whether he was discussing his prior accomplishments and experience or discussing the problems facing low-income minority kids. I guess I was hoping to learn more about these students themselves and find easy solutions to their problems, but of course, there are no easy ones.

One thing the author clearly steered away from was the role and culture of the family of these children. He offered so many possible solutions that put the responsibility on federal and state governments, school districts, communities, etc., but woefully left out the most important people responsible: the parents. The saying "it all starts at home" is perfectly accurate. I would liked to have seen more attention spent on discussing and offering solutions to the many other problems children from lower socioeconomic groups experience. These include the over abundance of single parent homes, uneducated, unprepared, young parents, distrust of government and school officials, and a culture of blaming others for their problems. I guess this would take a whole new book.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Currently this is the concern of every black parent with a male child. Our deep concern is a constant source of worry. Insite into the behaviors that form their thinking is helpful. I am also CEO of the Bright Minds Institute for Autism, N.J. Inc. We are a non-profit urban group of parents and stakeholders deeply invovled with youth transitioning into adulthood.

We also work with the N.J. Police Association through lectures and conferences that bring awareness to them about behaviors exhibited by teen yoth with often behavior disorders, because we know that many times the behaviors are not understood, and often misinterpreted.
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