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The Truck Food Cookbook: 150 Recipes and Ramblings from America's Best Restaurants on Wheels Paperback – May 8, 2012


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The Truck Food Cookbook: 150 Recipes and Ramblings from America's Best Restaurants on Wheels + The Food Truck Handbook: Start, Grow, and Succeed in the Mobile Food Business + Running a Food Truck For Dummies
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Workman Publishing Company (May 8, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 076115616X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0761156161
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 9.2 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (53 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #14,054 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

John T. Edge, a five-time James Beard Award nominee, writes the monthly “United Tastes” for The New York Times. His work for Saveur and other magazines has been featured in seven editions of the Best Food Writing compilations. He runs the Southern Foodways Alliance at the University of Mississippi. His last book was Algonquin’s Southern Belly: The Ultimate Food Lover’s Companion to the South. Mr. Edge lives with his wife and son in Oxford, Mississippi.

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Customer Reviews

Really well designed book with great pictures.
Silke Reber
I was expecting more guidance from this book but perhaps I am not the target audience.
mister
The recipes are easy to follow and well written.
CristiAk

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

41 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Marty Martindale on May 11, 2012
Format: Paperback
The Truck Food Cookbook:
150 Recipes and Ramblings from America's
Best Restaurants on Wheels

By John T. Edge
Recipes and photography by Angie Mosier
A review by Marty Martindale, Editor, Food site Magazine

This is a very interesting food book on many levels. It is a cookbook, but more, because it demonstrates the many cultural approaches to foods and spices there are. This is also an idea and inspirational book for budding entrepreneurial cook/chef. There is also a lot of good humor, light-hearted philosophies and thoughtful, meaty insertions. We like the "Last seen" squibs. The book also gives a good idea as to how much work owning a food truck takes and glimpses the nitty-gritty of it all, besides the $s, praise and glory.

There are many ways to ride the cilantro and cumin express these days from fries and pies, waffles, sandwiches, tacos, Asian, Mexican, Caribbean, Hawaiian and European. Edge and his staff have done a great job of it.
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25 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Rafael Alvarez on November 16, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book is great, a lot of info and stories but most of the recipes are "inspire by" .. they are not the real recipes from the truckfood chefs. Thats not what I was hoping for.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Michael on June 11, 2012
Format: Paperback
Fans of food cart cuisine have a lot to discover in this book. Other books have toured the various food carts around the country. And some focus on the recipes of a particular cart's chef. But here's a book that brings some very tasty and very different recipes together under one cover.

So, what's the advantage to a street cart cook book, when the food is so easily accessible anyway? Well, one, if you don't live in a big city, your food cart options are pretty small anyway. So this gives you a chance to "sample" food you might otherwise not be able to. Two, this book provides a useful record for an emerging eclectic tradition.

While making the food at home may not be as magical or even as tasty as having it handed to you through a cart window, you certainly get a worthy culinary glimpse. Highly recommended for fans of street cuisine.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Judith on January 29, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
The premise here is to share recipes from food trucks around the nation. However, these aren’t the recipes from the sort of average food truck most of us know. The author targets “foodie” type trucks where food is trendy and gimmicky. I’m glad I borrowed the ebook from the library, because this book really isn’t for me, but it may be for you. I am not a foodie, and frankly, I often felt some of these truck owners took themselves and their food way too seriously. However, if you lean that way, you might find this book to be just what you want. I found it interesting enough for a look through, but can’t see myself making or eating things like ice cream topped with wasabi , or macaroni and cheese grilled sandwiches. The author definitely goes for novelty foods. For instance, there is a recipe for a grilled cheese cheeseburger where you make two grilled cheese sandwiches with thick Texas toast bread, make a cheeseburger, then use one grilled cheese sandwich as the bottom bun and the other as the top bun. (Go straight to the ER for your heart attack, after eating that.) I should note that a lot of the recipes were the author’s recipes “inspired by” the food he ate at various food trucks. Be warned that these recipes often called for ingredients that aren’t found in typical grocery stores. Some people enjoy tracking down and using unusual ingredients, but I generally skip that kind of recipe. Then there is the cheesesteak recipe issue. I’ve lived in Philadelphia for 27 years. I’ve seen them with peppers, onions, mushrooms, different kinds of cheese, with chicken instead of beef—even tricked out as hoagies. What is not authentic is a cheesesteak topped with Broccoli Rabe. However, you may like the idea of enhancing classic foods with new twists.Read more ›
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By I. Darren on February 18, 2013
Format: Paperback
This is a different kind of book covering a different type of food - food served from a truck! There is a lot more than buyers and ice cream on offer and many of these mobile restaurants serve quirky, different high-quality food from an incredibly small kitchen.

To the uninitiated food served from the roadside or marketplace is just grill food such as hot dogs, burgers and "junk food". Through this book perhaps it will change a few perceptions and maybe encourage you to try some truck food for yourself. For the non-American reader there is the chance to savour a bit of U.S. culture, compare it to what might be available in your own country and, of course, reproduce some of these dishes.

The author has been actively criss-crossing the United States of America, eating a lot of "mobile food" along the way and learning what makes these places tick. Sharing 150 different recipes, countless techniques and many hints, the home cook can create some of their own quirky little dishes in the (perhaps) massive space of their home kitchen.

Split into several sections - fries & pies, waffles and their kin, brunch on wheels, unexpected pleasures, sandwich up!, hot dogs (with a bow to burgers), tacopalooza and rolling in sweets - you can straight away get a bit of an idea about the types of food you will encounter. Yet it is likely that you won't guess it all correctly. This is not a travel guide where you think you will be in City X and look what to eat. Instead the location is mostly irrelevant (and since the restaurants are on four or more wheels they could also have moved...).

The dishes speak for themselves, perhaps with a nod to regional tastes and impressions. Each recipe is relatively clear to follow and you are given a lot of background material at the same time.
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