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24 Reviews
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Trust is terrific!
I think The Trust is absolutely riveting. It's worth reading for the chapter on the Pentagon Papers alone--a drama that has you on the edge of your seat, even though you know what happened! But The Trust is a lot more than that. The decisions behind what runs, and what does not run, in The New York Times are complex and difficult. For the first time--as far as I can...
Published on September 11, 1999 by Richard Goodman

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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Beside the Times
This massive chronicle of the Ochs-Sulzbergers and their stewardship of the New York Times gets off to a fascinating start, dramatizing Adolph Ochs' purchase of the then nothing New-York Times and detailing his wildly successful efforts to build a paper of note.
But once Ochs vanishes from the narrative, bequeathing the editorship to son-in-law Arthur Sulzberger, the...
Published on November 9, 2002 by schapmock


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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Trust is terrific!, September 11, 1999
By 
Richard Goodman (New Orleans, LA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I think The Trust is absolutely riveting. It's worth reading for the chapter on the Pentagon Papers alone--a drama that has you on the edge of your seat, even though you know what happened! But The Trust is a lot more than that. The decisions behind what runs, and what does not run, in The New York Times are complex and difficult. For the first time--as far as I can tell--the authors, with the skill and caring of fine novelists, show us who these people are and why they do (and did) the things they do. If you want to know how The New York Times came to be what it is, read this book. It's a story of human courage, frailty, jealousy, ambition, loss and success. In short--the story of a family. It's right out of Balzac. I really loved it.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thoroughly entertaining family biography, January 14, 2001
By 
frumiousb "frumiousb" (Amsterdam, the Netherlands) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Trust: The Private and Powerful Family Behind The New York Times (Paperback)
This exhaustively researched and really gripping book tells the story of Sulzberger/Ochs family and their relationship to the New York Times. As the family behind the Times, they were players on the stage of American history for most of the twentieth century. The family itself and the characters in it are fascinating-- the subjects range from Iphegene Ochs frustration that she as a woman would never be considered the heir to the throne, to the way that Adolph Ochs wheeled and dealed his way into building the NYT, to the hard family choices behind the publication of the Pentagon papers, to modern attempts from within the company to break the family power. It's a wonderful glimpse at one of the most powerful families of our time. It's worth noting that this book is not a business case history and that the reader will not find an explicit overview of any of the strategies that made the Times what it is.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Beside the Times, November 9, 2002
By 
schapmock (New York, New York) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Trust: The Private and Powerful Family Behind The New York Times (Paperback)
This massive chronicle of the Ochs-Sulzbergers and their stewardship of the New York Times gets off to a fascinating start, dramatizing Adolph Ochs' purchase of the then nothing New-York Times and detailing his wildly successful efforts to build a paper of note.
But once Ochs vanishes from the narrative, bequeathing the editorship to son-in-law Arthur Sulzberger, the book slowly loses steam. Focus shifts from the newsroom to the myriad Ochs-Sulzberger relatives and their beside-the-Times activities, in response to which a reader can only offer a heartfelt shrug.
In defense of The Trust it has been pointed out that the authors set out to write about the family rather than the paper, but apparently there's little of inherent interest in the Ochs-Sulzbergers outside the Times. Down the backstretch, the authors seem as bored as the reader, dutifully recounting the gossipy infighting among far-flung cousins.
The Trust, excellent as much of it is, comes to seem unfortunately conceived -- the newsroom coverage is exemplary, but the beside the Times gossip grows quickly tiresome.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A thorough and revealing portrait of a eminent family, September 19, 1999
By A Customer
Tifft and Jones have written a well researched and interesting piece on one of America's most powerful, yet low-key, families, the Sulzbergers. The book is very objective, presents much of the family's quotations and answers without unecessary comment, and is historically significant. Although the family cooperated, Tifft and Jones do not have an awe or devotion to any particular slant or image. The power of the Times rests in its historical and present ethics and standards, and the guidance of a family that continues to regard it very much as sacred. A highly recommended book for anyone wishing to learn about this remarkable family!
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderfully entertaining history, without fear or favor, September 20, 1999
By A Customer
I spent a week devouring this book slowly, enjoying it like a fine meal. From the beginnings in Tennessee to the present, this book and this story have the makings of an American epic, and the authors do a wonderful job making you care about these people and the newspaper they care about. Those who found shortcomings in this book, I suspect, wanted something other than the rich story that is here. I highly recommend it.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Times They Are A'Changing, January 3, 2000
This brilliant analysis of members of several generations of the Ochs and Sulzberger families gives not one but several human faces to one of America's most influential cultural dynasties. Many of us who have the New York Times delivered to our doorstep each day may perhaps view it primarily (if not solely) as an invaluable source of information and commentary. It is certainly that. However, in The Trust, Tifft & Jones enable us to understand the multi-generational human infrastructure which -- over several decades -- has guided the evolution of a struggling newspaper to its current influence which includes but is by no means limited to journalism. The Trust bears at least some resemblance to a novel: There are so many colorful characters, so many plots and sub-plots, so many insights into the texture and nuances of America society. If Tolstoy had written a history of this unique dynasty, the result would probably be similar to what Tifft & Jones have produced. In my opinion, it would be difficult (if not impossible) to understand the American 20th Century without understanding the role played by the New York Times. The Trust is a brilliant achievement in terms of its historical content; remarkably, it is also compelling in terms of the narrative within which that content is brought to life.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A VERY GOOD BOOK ON THE FIRST FAMILY OF NEWSPAPERS!, November 17, 1999
By 
MJR (Los Angeles, CA) - See all my reviews
"The Trust," is a very well written account of the family that has operated The New York Times for over 100 years. The book is as much about the family as it is about the newspaper. The only shortcomming is sometimes periods of time (i.e. World War II) are too condensed. But overall a fascinating read on a interesting topic!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Captivating, November 18, 2000
This is a very interesting and captivating book dealing with the family that owns the New York times one of the World's most important newspapers. It starts with the emigration to America from Europe by the founder's father before the civil war it trails the emigration from Tennessee to New York by the founder in search of better oportunities after starting a paper in Chattanooga. It is also a story about family-Competition,jelousy,marrying up and down social classes,love and the lack thereof,succesion batles and other sundry conflicts. It is also a story that details the real people behind the masthead and the behind the scenes stories of the great events of the 20th Century. Personal details about such giants as Baruch,Pershing,Eastman,Pullitzer,Josephine Baker,Lindbergh to mention but a few are also present. Reading through the book especially in the early days there was the ever present scourge of antisemitism hanging hauntingly like the sword of damocles. This invariably led to some extent of self censorship and hesitancy in coverage of some important events like the holocaust. The authors have painstakingly done a lot of research and have published a very good book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Audio Book left out many important points, December 28, 2000
By A Customer
The Audio book left out many important points made in the acutal book. It focused on the personal side of the Ochs/Sulzberger family, rather than some of the important issues impacting the paper. Points left out of the audio book: the paper/family ducking Jewish issues, the Times protesting the Frank lynching, covering the Dreyfus case belatedly, opposing Louis Brandeis's appointment to the Supreme Court, the depressions Ochs suffered from, not promoting several Jews to important editorial positions, relegating the Holecaust to back pages, their coverage of Bay of Pigs, and refusal to recall David Halberstam from Vietnam in the face of JFK pressure. The audio book's coverage of the Pentagon Papers incident is poor and minimal. The audio book mentions the taming of unions, but never attributes it to automated technology. Yet the audio book is able to take the time to detail Arthur Hays Sulzberger's womanizing. The audio book is like a Cliff Notes version of the book...unfortunately leaving out many of the important points.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Kennedys of Journalism, August 28, 2001
Tifft and Jones rip the gown off the old Gray Lady to reveal the hidden secrets of the family that made the New York Times the respected powerhouse it is today. The story of the Ochs/Sulzburger clan appeals on two levels. First, it is the story of the making of the newspaper, the ethical and financial decisions required to make the Times both reputable and profitable. And second, it is a good old scandal story, filled with affairs and family altercations, and Times Square palace intrigues. While the book remains superficial about the journalism, it delves deeply into the characters, who are of course the most fun part of the tale.
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The Trust: The Private and Powerful Family Behind The New York Times
The Trust: The Private and Powerful Family Behind The New York Times by Alex S. Jones (Paperback - September 20, 2000)
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