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Comment: ISBN . Mass Market Paperback. First Printing. Very Good to Near Fine condition book. Tight, bright, attractive copy with no markings to the book except for Slight browning to the edges of the interior pages. Ballantine book #T-1647
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The Truth About Flying Saucers Mass Market Paperback – June 1, 1967


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 270 pages
  • Publisher: Pyramid UFO Books (June 1, 1967)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0007DRR38
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 4.2 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,604,522 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By The Guardian TOP 500 REVIEWER on September 1, 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Aime Michel (1919-1992) was a diminutive, brilliant and eccentric French researcher qualified in psychology and philosophy, who in the early days of the public manifestation of the UFO phenomenon (i.e. post-1946) was probably the leading European thinker and writer on the subject. His observations and writings on the UFO issue were truly groundbreaking and stand up well even today, 50 years later.

In "The Truth about Flying Saucers" published originally in French in 1954 and shortly after in English, Michel details encounters worldwide with a special focus on those in France, many of which he personally investigated. It became obvious to him at an early stage that the phenomenon was "real, not fictitious or imaginary" (a quote from Nathan Twining in his famous memorandum) and that what was frequently being encountered were structured nuts-and-bolts craft with extraordinary flight characteristics, probably of non-human manufacture.

The author uses a reasoned, step-by-step approach to the issue and speculates within the limits of then-current scientific paradigms how they might be powered: obviously by no human-manufactured technology available in 1956. He details the thoughts of other writers on the subject including, surprisingly, those of Donald Menzel.

Jacques Vallee's early thoughts on the subject of "Objects Volants Non-Identifié" were strongly influenced by Michel, whom he often acknowledges as a source. Michel was an interesting guy, if you research his life and works, and deserves more recognition outside his native France where he is better known.

Paperback copies os "The Truth about Flying Saucers" in English are cheap and plentiful, though genuinely good original hardcover copies more difficult to find.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
First published in 1956, engineer and mathematician Aime Michel delves into the matter of "flying saucers" with this book, choosing the more prevalent phrase of the time over "UFO." Indeed the 1950s was an era of numerous "flaps," not the least of which was the 1952 mass sighting over Washington D.C. which Michel addresses in the book. It was also a time of odd events, such as "angel hair" falling to the ground.

While there are mentions of such bizarre occurrences in The Truth About Flying Saucers, Michel confines his study primarily to aerial sightings, especially those that have hard evidence involved such as radar returns. And that may be the greatest strength of the text. Michel adopts a no-nonsense, step-by-step approach to investigating the phenomena, applying rigorous scrutiny to each case. He is slavish when it comes to evidence and pococurante when it comes to sensationalism. There are no accounts by anyone who claimed to have met the occupants of the craft in question. There are no mentions of the sort of narratives that one might see in The Weekly World News or whatever today's equivalent is called. Michel sticks with pure sightings and...almost tediously...sorts through numerous sightings from many parts of the world.

One of the more interesting prospects that Michel puts forth is "The Plantier Theory." An officer in the French Air Force, Lt. Plantier devoted a significant amount of time to pondering the UFO phenomenon. Plantier, as indeed so many others did and still do, worked from the stance that UFOs were spacecraft from other planets. His theory as to how the saucers were able to cross the vast distances and were also able to move at incredible speeds without causing sonic booms has to do with force fields.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By robert sutherland on October 17, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
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