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  • The Twilight Zone: Obsolete Man/ Death's Head Revisited [VHS]
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The Twilight Zone: Obsolete Man/ Death's Head Revisited [VHS]


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Product Details

  • Actors: Rod Serling, Robert McCord, Jay Overholts, Vaughn Taylor, James Turley
  • Writers: Rod Serling
  • Format: Black & White, HiFi Sound, NTSC
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • Studio: 20th Century Fox
  • VHS Release Date: January 1, 1998
  • Run Time: 100 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6302468566
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #591,448 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

The Twilight Zone: Obsolete Man/ Death's Head Revisited [VHS] (1959)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on December 8, 2001
Format: DVD
There is an interesting pattern to the episodes collected on Volume 10 of "The Twilight Zone" DVD series since the third episode essentially merges the first two together. But the key element here is obviously Time Travel. "The Last Flight," written by Richard Matheson, was sold to "The Twilight Zone" on the strength of a simple idea: a World War I pilot lands at a modern airbase. The pilot is Flight Lt. Decker (Kenneth Haigh), who fled during a dogfight, leaving his best friend surrounded by enemy fighters, doomed to die. After flying through a strange white cloud, similar to the Matheson employed in "The Incredible Shrinking Man" one would assume, Decker lands at a modern day American air field in France (you have to pretend we had them). There Decker learns that he might have a chance to redeem himself and more importantly, a reason to do so. "Once Upon a Time," also written by Matheson is a rare opportunity for outright slapstick in the Zone. The show features the great silent comedian Buster Keaton as janitor Woodrow Mulligan. Disgusted with the fast paced and high priced society of 1890, Woodrow steals a "time helmet" from the inventor who employs him, and travels to 1962. Of course, he is in for quite a bit of future shock. The 1890 sequences are down in silent fashion, with cards instead of dialogue, but the humor is trite rather than funny. Keaton is fine, but the gags are second-rate at best, which is really a surprise since the episode was directed by Norman Z. McLeod, who directed the Marx Brothers films "Horse Feathers" and "Monkey Business." This is just one of those cases were major talents come together and produce a small pop instead of a big bang.Read more ›
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Leslie Karen Rigsbey on September 19, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
Two masterful episodes, both originated by Serling. In "Death's Head Revisited," a Nazi gets a dose of his own medicine. In "The Obsolete Man," Burgess Meredith gives a riveting performance as a librarian in the desolate future where books have been banned. It has everything: a moral, suspense, wit, and irony. A must.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By kenneth lightfoot on January 1, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
The Obsolete Man stand up with the best of Sterling's work on the Twilight zone. Just Look at all the jails being built and the people they put in them and you may begain to realize how current this one twilight zone show is. Goverments still decides who's obsolete. Not to be missed!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By NMdesapio on September 21, 2004
Format: VHS Tape
The Obsolete Man" and "Deaths-Head Revisited" both deal - one in a veiled and the other in an explicit way - with oppression, Nazism, and the Holocaust. In the first episode, Burgess Meredith plays a librarian who is ruled "obsolete" and condemned to die by a State that has outlawed books, free thought, and God. This chilling episode truly makes one imagine and fear a society in which the creative individual has no place.

In "Deaths-Head Revisited," a former S.S. captain named Gunther Lutze (the cold-eyed Oscar Bergei) revisits the Dachau concentration camp out of nostalgia, only to encounter Alfred Bekker (the quietly captivating Joseph Schildkraut, who had previously played Mr. Otto Frank in THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK on stage and screen), a former inmate of the camp. Rod Serling was one of the first television writers to deal with the Holocaust, and his work here is unforgettable due to such powerful lines as Bekker's final one, and to Serling's own moving and timely closing narration, which tells us why we must "never forget." The fact that the Holocaust victims are referred to not as "Jews" but as "human beings" demonstrates Serling's talent for cutting to the moral core of an issue.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Amazon sold it for $4.99 (New) when I purchased it.

These are the episodes in this collection...

The Last Flight (Episode 18 - February 5, 1960): A World War I flying ace (Kenneth Haigh) flies through a mysterious cloud - and lands at a modern U.S. air base in the year 1960! But the strange part is yet to come...

Once Upon a Time (Episode 78 - December 15, 1961): Woodrow (Buster Keaton), a janitor living in the year 1890, accidentally activates a time travelling helmet which transports him to 1962 - then promptly breaks down!

A Hundred Yards Over the Rim (Episode 59 - April 7, 1961): In 1847 a western settler (Cliff Robertson) sets out to find medicine for his dying son - and stumbles into modern-day New Mexico. He returns with much more than just medicine...

The Trouble with Templeton(Episode 45 - December 9, 1960): Booth Templeton (Brian Ahern) is an aging actor who longs for the old days when his wife was alive. Miraculously, he is given a sobering glimpse of the past he holds so dear.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Who can resist the sometimes hokey, old fashioned enjoyment of re-living the old Twilight Zone episodes! Order a few! Great stuff!
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Format: DVD
Volume 10 in the series of "Twilight Zone" DVDs includes in all four episodes a common theme that was looked at many times during the run of the show. Time traveling. Whether going forward or backwards in time it was always an interesting look at how someone would respond suddenly to being placed in a different place and time from the current time they are from. In all four cases for the main characters in the episodes on this disc find themselves in such a predicament. In three of the stories they go forward in time and in the other backwards. But in every case they are still in the "Twilight Zone".

In the first story a WWI pilot while in the middle of a dog fight suddenly flies through a cloud and over 40 plus years into the future titled "The Last Flight". Landing on a U. S. airbase located in France Flight Lt. Decker , played by Kenneth Haigh, is surprised to see the modern fighter jets when he lands and even more so when he finds out that the year is 1960. Of course everyone at the airbase is equally surprised to see a vintage WWI airplane landing on their airstrip and of course questions are brought up as to why this person and his plane are on the base and certainly don't believe the pilot and his plane are from the first world war. What is revealed causes Decker to realize he has to get back to where he came from. A pretty decent episode.

"Once Upon A Time" is one of those rare humorous episodes that stars the legendary Buster Keaton. He plays a janitor name Woodrow Mulligan who lives in 1890 and is frustrated by the fast pace of light and longs for a time where things are easier and not so noisy.
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