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103 of 120 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Eye Opener
After reading this book and checking out the reliability of the information it contains, I have changed many of my traditions and religious beliefs. It is truly frightening to see how our eyes are blinded by the accepted religious traditions and we do things that are truly unacceptable to our Creator. I found the numerous descriptions of the origins of our religious...
Published on December 28, 1999

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61 of 76 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Highly controversial
A current trend among Christians is to start questioning the origins of "Christmas" and "Easter" and the baptism of infants and the deification of Mary and numerous other "sacraments", beliefs and traditions. And that is good. In a way, Hislop started all of this with this book, more than 100 years ago.
At the time it seemed to have been very well researched, but...
Published on August 2, 2008 by Aj Viljoen


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103 of 120 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Eye Opener, December 28, 1999
By A Customer
After reading this book and checking out the reliability of the information it contains, I have changed many of my traditions and religious beliefs. It is truly frightening to see how our eyes are blinded by the accepted religious traditions and we do things that are truly unacceptable to our Creator. I found the numerous descriptions of the origins of our religious icons to be fascinating and enlightening. Any person who is truly interested in pure, clean worship of our Creator MUST read this book.
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104 of 123 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Classic Which Stands the Test of Time, September 6, 1999
By A Customer
There's no doubt about it this book is a difficult read. However, with a little persistence you too can get through this book. This book is certainly controversial, especially in our politically correct society where it is a no-no to criticize anyone or anyone's beliefs. This book compares Roman Catholicism with ancient Pagan Beliefs (primarily Babylonian and Egyptian). It's true you cannot make a direct connection of the two belief systems but the similarities are definitely there for anyone with an OPEN mind to see. Any visitor to the Vatican can see the pagan symbology staring them straight in the face. However, most people would rather bury their heads in the sand than confront the pagan origins of many of today's so-called christian traditions. They fail to consider that if the Bible was their ONLY source for religion, then Christmas, Easter, Sunday Worship, the Trinity, Halloween, and Lent would fall by the wayside since these are not of Biblical origin but man-made traditions and beliefs. Truth is the beginning of knowledge. I would rate this book 5 stars if it were easier to read.
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104 of 124 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's obvious, February 11, 2008
A Kid's Review
This review is from: The Two Babylons (Paperback)
I read this book and found that it helped piece together a huge part of a very complicated puzzle. Not an easy read but definately a wealth of information. I think the author retracted for reasons other than poor research methods. I think he retracted his work for the same reasons many other controversial books are pulled from publication. I was born and raised Catholic and to this day the priests still wear the attire worn by Ancient Dagon Priests. The Pope also uses the same instruments used by Ancient Pagan Priests affiliated with Babylonian Religion. There are many more similarities that are just too hard to ignore. I know it's a tough pill to swallow when you've been spoon fed this nonsense for years but it's pretty obvious. Catholics eat fish on Friday in honor of Dagon (Pagan Fish God). I mean folks if it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck, it just might be......... you guessed it. Let's use some common sense, remember common sense????
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29 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A work of impressive footnotes and comprehensive mythology, March 25, 2003
By A Customer
Mr. Hislop's Two Babylons has been resourceful ammunition for an anti ROMAN catholic doctrine (not Ante-Nicene "catholicism, which means "universal"[i.e. "pre-Constantinian council and opinions//c.a. 325 A.D.]). He has 'exposed' the major parts of Mary and Saint worship. He has shown the picture-type of the pope from the pope's pagan origins. He has shown that the Roman Catholicism is absolutely ANTITHETICAL to the Bible. I couldn't agree more. There are a few discrepencies found, but, nothing that would detur me from saying that this is probably the greatest polemic against the ROMAN catholic church ever made. And, interestingly enough, I believe that Hislop was trying to show the facts and not make a diatribe. SO, Roman Catholics, please read this book, if you really do, you will change your religion.
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57 of 69 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great thesis, moderate research, horrible writing style, November 2, 2002
The thesis of this book is that Roman Catholicism is--to use the words of the author--"baptised paganism". The author states that the Roman Catholic Church, with its doctrines, organization, and practices, is simply a continuation of the ancient Babylonian "Mystery" religion built around the worship of Nimrod, his wife Semiramis, and the child Tammuz. He further states that the prophetic "Whore of Babylon" described in Revelation 17 and 18 is none other than the great false church of the Tribulation: the Roman Catholic Church. The thesis is startling, provocative, and, in my opinion, correct.
However, the author's scientific standard of research leaves much to be desired. For proof of his thesis he offers some hard facts, many more inferences, and lots of pure speculation. The voluminous footnotes do not go far in hiding the poor research standards. In the end, I believe a modern author ought to rewrite this book in the light of the most recent archaeology. The thesis deserves a better standard of scholarship.
The writing style is typical 19th century verbosity. The author writes with an intense conversational tone, as if he is urging the reader to agree immediately with his thesis. He would have spent his energies better writing with a more direct, dispassionate, and orderly style.
In the end, this book is well worth the price for those who are looking for the origins of Romanism and wonder why the Catholic practices are so distant from Biblical Christianity. Where do "popes", Mary-worship, confessionals, crossing oneself and the like come from? From ancient Babylon and her Mystery religion! After reading this book, you will never read Revelation 17:5 the same again.
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31 of 36 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Things Are Often Not What They Seem, December 29, 1999
By A Customer
Majoring in the substance of the Puritan case against the papacy, this book is upsetting to Romanists, but remarkably enlightening to the serious church history scholar.
It is not particularly easy reading, but the content is solid and well documented.
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61 of 76 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Highly controversial, August 2, 2008
This review is from: The Two Babylons (Paperback)
A current trend among Christians is to start questioning the origins of "Christmas" and "Easter" and the baptism of infants and the deification of Mary and numerous other "sacraments", beliefs and traditions. And that is good. In a way, Hislop started all of this with this book, more than 100 years ago.
At the time it seemed to have been very well researched, but cracks in the woodwork has appeared since. This doesn't mean that everything he writes is wrong, but simply that what is written cannot be accepted as the undisputed truth.

Hislop does, however come very close to the truth for the most part. It is, luckily, also quite easy to discern where he bases arguments on facts, and where he makes deductions. In is in the deductions where the fault lies, because he is a little too liberal in his deductions, and these should be taken with a pinch of salt, or simply disregarded. As I said, the factual parts are however, highly informative and often very shocking.

Another problem is that the book is written in a highly academic way and is by no means an easy read. Add to this the subject matter, and it rapidly becomes a "study" rather than a "read". But a fascinating study, nonetheless.

So the bad news is that the book isn't entirely accurate, and plain difficult. That said however, it almost qualifies as "essential reading" for the Christian who is in any way concerned with the pagan origins of current Christian practices or the history of the Catholic Church. As I said, controversial.

Many people simply reject the evidence that Mr Hislop presents because of its controversial nature. And that is the easy way out. It is not easy to critisize one's own church, especially if one is a devout and committed Christian. But, in spite of all its shortcomings, this book does present one with evidence that demands further contemplation.

This book however, goes further than that, in the sense that Hislop shows the reader how all the religions fit together, from Jesus Christ to Buddha to the temple prostitutes of Diana and Adonis. Fascinating stuff, but presented in the most boring way imaginable.

So, this is a tedious book, for serious scholars. But it does deliver. And it is controversial and it is relevant, 150 years after it was written. It is certainly not everyone's cup of tea, but it is by far the best publication to date on the ancient origins of religion, mythology and doctrine. It is the kind of book I would seriously study from cover to cover, but not expect anyone else to read.
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30 of 36 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very fascinating book., September 6, 2005
I spent a large amount of time studying this subject, (Nimrod, the history of modern Christianity in relation to pagan worship, Baal, etc....) This book is great! I only gave it four stars simply because of the migraine I received after reading it. You may need a magnifying glass, or perhaps a microscope to read this. I still couldn't put this book down and it was well worth the headache!

Let me explain a little more, when I say you will need a microscope, well I mean the text in the book I had was very small. I mean VERY SMALL. I perhaps lost a bit of my eyesight for a few days, but as I mentioned before, this book is very good. There is a ton of footnotes and references as well. You will see many illustrations to go along with the topic. If you are doing research on this subject, this book is a great tool. It's a great realization book as well. It should really get you to thinking deeply about the modern holidays and 'holy days' you worship.

The basis of this book, or the grounds is to basically prove that modern Christianity is founded on pagan worship. We're going back to the days of Nimrod, Babylon, idoltry, pagan practices. It goes into Mother Mary worship, Easter, Sunday Sabbath, Chrismas, symbols such as the cross, worshipping the dead...etc...

I would honestly say this book was very eye-opening. OK, literally it was eye-straining, but I did very much enjoy reading the content.

You really must read this book! Again, I would have given it five stars, but oh the strain on your eyes! It is still worth it!
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47 of 58 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Struggling with religion? Read this book!!!, August 23, 2000
By 
S. Venema (San Diego, CA USA) - See all my reviews
Alexander Hislop has done an excellent job. He is one of the best scholars I have ever read. This book will certainly help you understand the difference and origin between religion and true Christianity. For the definition of religion is mans effort to reach God or to be God. True Christian worship is to marvel about an infinite God who became a man to show us the way. Through Hislops research it becomes clear that even though he focuses on the counterfeits, that the original(that is the one true God)is very real. And of course a counterfeit (religion)can only work if the original exists. This book is not only proof of the lies of wrong religion (Catholicism included) but much more of the existence of the true original. The book reveals an astonishing knowledge of the time in which Nimrod lived. For it is very well possible that Noahs son Shem lived very well into Nimrods age. If a survivor of the flood (which was Gods Judgement) was still around, that would explain why the people knew so much about ancient prophecies. Not surprising but still remarkably, this book is either loved or hated by those who read it. This reminds me on something else: For the word of God is living and active. Sharper than any double-edged sword, it penetrates even to dividing soul and spirit, joints and marrow; it judges the thoughts and attitudes of the heart.Hebrews 4:12 Everyone who reads this book should be challenged to read his Bible again. And if he does he has to face the fact that he has only two choices: either to believe the truth or to deny it! But either one doesn't make the truth untrue. The evidences this book reveals reminds me at: Woe to those who call evil good and good evil, who put darkness for light and light for darkness, who put bitter for sweet and sweet for bitter.Isaiah 5:20 Definitly a must-read for every Christian!
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30 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars TOTALLY AWESOME WORK, January 4, 2004
By 
Linda Carter (Philadelphia, PA) - See all my reviews
I read this book a long time ago. It is packed with incredible details outlining the origins of paganism, myths, legends, and their influence on religions of today. For anyone who is not afraid of FACTS AND TRUTH. Not for those who want to hang on to their religious traditions, and the doctrines and commandments of men. For example: how did we get Christmas on December 25, Easter with bunnies and eggs; Greek, Roman, and many other countries' legends and myths? It's all here, and much much more, documented with unbelievable detail and scholarship.
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The Two Babylons
The Two Babylons by Alexander Hislop (Paperback - June 1, 2007)
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