Umbrella Academy Volume 1: Apocalypse Suite and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.99
  • Save: $3.64 (20%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Umbrella Academy, Vol... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ex-library book. Includes usual library stamps and markings
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Umbrella Academy, Vol. 1 Paperback – July 22, 2008


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.35
$10.52 $4.92
$14.35 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

The Umbrella Academy, Vol. 1 + Umbrella Academy Volume 2: Dallas + The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys
Price for all three: $39.57

Buy the selected items together

If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $1.99 (Save 80%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.


Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Series: Umbrella Academy (Book 1)
  • Paperback: 184 pages
  • Publisher: Dark Horse Books; 1st edition (July 22, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1593079788
  • ISBN-13: 978-1593079789
  • Product Dimensions: 6.7 x 0.4 x 10.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (65 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #32,205 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

The newest superhero kids on the block are just that—kids. At least they start out kids in the first Umbrella Academy collection, written by the lead singer of My Chemical Romance (Way) and superbly illustrated by Brazilian graphic artist Ba. When the diminutive orphans turned masked crime fighters first appear in the public arena, with their wealthy patron, Sir Reginald Hargreeves, keeping watch, their nemesis is a mobile, death-ray-zapping Eiffel Tower. Twenty years later, it takes Hargreeves’ death to bring the gang members, now grown and separated by their own idiosyncratic ambitions, back together to face a new enemy: estranged sister Vanya, the only one of them presumed to be powerless. Newly gifted with destructive powers by a race of robotic aliens, Vanya will stop at nothing to destroy the world unless her siblings stop her. Way and Ba provide all the ingredients of a superhero team to rival the X-Men and make its colorful adventures a hit. --Carl Hays

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Ultimately not a very satisfying or good story.
McCool009
The story is great and the art work is stunning, not to mention it includes a few of Gerards original drawings which made her love it even more.
Heather
I would recommend this to anyone who is a die-hard My Chemical Romance fan (like myself) or really anyone who loves comics and superheroes.
Reagan Beentjes

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 39 people found the following review helpful By H. Bala TOP 500 REVIEWER on August 3, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A rocker writing comics? What's that about? And, yet, Gerard Way, of the rock band My Chemical Romance, comes up with a humdinger of a comic book in THE UMBRELLA ACADEMY: APOCALYPSE SUITE, a wonderfully strange and inventive six-issued limited series published by Dark Horse Comics. It's an auspicious debut, really, and, now, count me as completely sold on Gerard Way, comic book scribe.

So what's this thing about? Well, some time ago, around the globe and in the same instance, at 9:38pm, forty-three gifted children were born to women who had before shown no signs of pregnancy. An extraterrestrial masquerading as a human adopted seven of these children and trained them to save the world. But theirs was a cold and callous father, so it's no surprise that the kids grew up as a dysfunctional family. However, the training took hold and the kids did become superheroes.

But the story really begins years after the team, called the Umbrella Academy, had disbanded as most of the siblings reunite for their father's funeral. I say most, because one had perished (we don't know how), while another is too bitter and disinclined to pop in. During this sad gathering, a world-threatening menace promptly surfaces, forcing these bickering capes to quit the bellyaching and work together...except that, of course, they don't quit the bellyaching.

For those looking for something different, something original and wonderfully off-beat, THE UMBRELLA ACADEMY: APOCALYPSE SUITE will fit the bill. I don't know how much of Gerard Way's experiences and life style influenced him in his writing, but his stuff reads as from an askewed perspective. APOCALYPSE SUITE is inventive and surreal and keeps on surprising.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Sean Curley on August 26, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
One could be forgiven for expecting that a comic miniseries by one of the members of the band "My Chemical Romance" would be a gratuitous vanity project. That is, however, not the case. While I do not rate is as highly as many others here do, Gerard Way has produced a genuine story, with nice art by indie favourite Gabriel Ba (also known for Matt Fraction's Image series "Casanova").

As the description says, an unexplained global phenomenon saw numerous children born to women who had not previously shown signs of pregnancy. Seven of these are adopted by an eccentric millionaire, Sir Reginald Hargreeves (secretly a space alien), and raised to fight evil. This is the classic superhero setup of the X-Men. Well, it is, and it isn't. Way subverts some of the basic idea, particularly regarding the Professor X figure, Hargreeves (aka The Monocle). Hargreeves is a cold and demanding person who is not interested in providing the children with a genuine father figure; he is merely their boss. He even refers to the children by numbers, rather than names (their names are supplied by the 'mother' he deigned to provide, an animated clothes dummy; the kids are split in how they treat her, with some accepting her, while the rebelious Diego sees her as just another layer of artifice in their upbringing). Hargreeves' parental neglect is the catalyst for the primary villain plot, revolving around #7, Vanya, who has no powers, and thus was just not "special" as Hargreeves tells her directly. However, she may indeed have some purpose for an eccentric villain out to bring about the end of the world.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Red Dwarf on March 24, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I loved the art in this book. It was definitely its greatest asset. The story was interesting and very fast. I hope in future books to get to know more about these complicated characters. The writing is quirky and fun. My only complaint would be that I felt like it got over too soon. Overall I recommend this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By David A. French on February 10, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this because I was impressed with the art. I did not get it because of Gerard Way. In fact, those who do are really missing the best part. Gerard as an art director, and tone setter does a good job. However, there is really not much writing to speak of. Characters lack any serious depth. However, that doesn't matter because it has a robot zombie taking vengeance on Paris using the Eiffel Tower as a rocket ship. So what more can you want? Amazing art work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Heather on December 27, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this for my 13year daughter who is in LOVE with Gerard Way...she has the whole series downloaded to her Ipod so i figured the paperback would be a great gift. When it arrived I read the book just to see what it was like...and to my suprise it was a great book. The story is great and the art work is stunning, not to mention it includes a few of Gerards original drawings which made her love it even more. I am going to order the rest of the books in the series.....definately worth it! From a family of comic book lovers, this is a series we all will follow....I hope he continues writing!!!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Cai Yixin Jeremy on March 24, 2010
Format: Paperback
You walk into your local comic store. You see this trade paperback on the shelf, forcibly shoved into the corner where there had been no corner at all. You spend a tedious minute or two trying to finger it out and, finally, you start reading through the quip at the back of Umbrella Academy: Apocalypse suite. Oh my, "In an inexplicable worldwide event, forty-seven extraordinary children were spontaneously born by women who'd previously shown no pregnancy." Wow, you say. A few rows down, "...the Umbrella Academy, a dysfunctional family of superheroes with bizarre powers." You are thinking that is so X-Men and it's cool. Then you start reading the line that gets you intrigued, "Conceived and written by Gerard Way of My Chemical Romance," and suddenly you can't wait to dig into the first issue of the book.

The truth of the matter is that, whether you've heard of the guy or not, you won't know what to expect from this book even after reading the synopsis of the story or listening to a MCR record. It shows shades of Gerard's musical creativity (seen best in THE BLACK PARADE) but Umbrella Academy is an independent work, deserving of appreciation all on its own. Forty-seven children and seven of them chosen to be part of the Umbrella Academy, but to term them as superheroes would be generalizing a little much. From the first fight onwards, Gerard draws attention to these children and when he focuses on the often-overlooked member of the group, Vanya, you realize he is interested in how they, as a whole, interact and feel as well. But he doesn't see them as superheroes, no, not at all, more like super powered kids trained to be superheroes. Gerard doesn't so much emphasize their roles but use them as `vehicles' to carry forward a deeper story of morality and loneliness.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?