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72 of 75 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of Jung's Best
I first read this book about half a decade ago, and even after much of the reading I've done in between I've found myself coming back to this more then a few time and rereading this masterpiece of philosophy. This is not only one of Jung's best works, Its also flat out one of the best books I have ever read in my entire life. Looking back from when I first read this about...
Published on September 27, 2009 by Aeris

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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Very difficult reading
This is my first book by Jung. I got it because I wanted to learn more about him and his work. I found the book extremely difficult to read. Jung wrote in very convoluted writing style.
Published 22 months ago by Wayne Andrus


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72 of 75 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of Jung's Best, September 27, 2009
This review is from: The Undiscovered Self (Mass Market Paperback)
I first read this book about half a decade ago, and even after much of the reading I've done in between I've found myself coming back to this more then a few time and rereading this masterpiece of philosophy. This is not only one of Jung's best works, Its also flat out one of the best books I have ever read in my entire life. Looking back from when I first read this about 4 or 5 years ago, I find it amazing how much just one line of dialogue here or a paragraph over there has completely shaped so much of the way I think and who I am. This is book is a treasure chest full of jewels for the intellect and the spirit alike which explores individualism and spirituality in so many key ways its a wonder why this hasn't made it on the mandatory reading list for psychology, religious, or philosophy oriented classes. Get your hands on this book, and when your done, hand it to someone else, because its a must read!
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172 of 189 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The power to stand against the World, February 21, 2006
By 
OAKSHAMAN "oakshaman" (Algoma, WI United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Undiscovered Self (Mass Market Paperback)
_In this book Jung correctly predicted that Communism had to collapse from within. No one else saw that coming. Why should they? For, as he points out, the mass state had all the force of the big battalions on their side- politics, science, and technology were their natural allies. And yet they collapsed.

_Should we rejoice in this? Why? Jung points out that the West is every bit as materialistic as our former Communist opponents. Our spiritual base is gone- in the place of true religion we have aging cults that serve the status quo. There is no inner power there. Every place Jung uses the term Communist, you can substitute Corporate and you have the same animal. That is because both are hierarchical structures where the individual counts for nothing. Indeed, the self-knowledge or individualization that would produce true men and women capable of standing up to the hierarchy is actively discouraged. They are trapped in the illusion of statistical man and of the organization- neither of which really exist. Only a few at the top can exercise the power of a true individual, and even they are usually no more than mouthpieces for the undeveloped masses and their unconscious drives.

_The hope for Jung lies in true religion. The freedom and autonomy of the individual depends on deep inner experience of a metaphysical nature. This is not "faith"; it is direct knowing. Even the deepest faith may melt away with time and circumstances- but not direct experience. It is only this that gives the individual the power to stand up to mass tyranny- and to the World itself. When you haven't made this breakthrough (which requires deep introspection, effort, and, yes, suffering) then other things get deified and charged with demonic energy- money, work, political influence...

_The shallow, rootless mass-man and his organizations are always going to lose, eventually, to the man with deep religious connection to the Macrocosm. Jung the Gnostic, Jung the Christian, Jung the Alchemist, Jung the Magician saw this. The individuated man has the cosmic correspondence within himself.
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31 of 32 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A book which covers an important issue we are facing in out Global Village., February 4, 2008
This review is from: The Undiscovered Self (Mass Market Paperback)
If you have read much of Jung's works especially Man and His Symbols then don't expect any surprises this text pertains to the importance of individuation. Important in Jung's time and in our Global Village. This book only pertains to the pertinence of the issue not the how. So once you are done I suggest readingEgo and Archetype. A good book none the less and a decent intro to Jung Psych although I feel that Man and His Symbols is a better introduction.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Where love stops, power begins, and violence, and terror.", May 8, 2012
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This review is from: The Undiscovered Self (Mass Market Paperback)
Although written more than half century ago, this conscise book (only about 100 pages) probably offered me the greatest insight that I came across recently. I have read many "self-help", "new age", "spiritual" books over the last decade or so and I realize that almost none of them essentially touched the root cause of the modern man's problems. Indeed, as Jung points out, the modern man's psychological emptiness does not come about as the result of technological development but can be traced back to the beginning of mankind. Technological development only enhances men's destructive capacities and inner emptiness.

Growing up in a authoritarian regime and educated in the West, I recently came to the realization that the spirit of collectivist conformity has reborn and reshaped itself in the form of blind consumerism in the "free world". the so-called "free" men in democratic consumerist countries are gradually losing the essence and understanding of being a human being. The pursuit of deep self-reflections and unique individual inner experiences has been replaced by the ever unsatisfied urge of acquiring new consumer products or shallow sensory stimulations that is popularly called "entertainment".

Modern advertisement and sophisticated psychological manipulation techniques deployed by corporations in the pursuit of profit has reduced individual humans beings into mere "consumers", i.e. an individual being has become just another number in the mass, (with certain differentiation so different corporations can market different products to suit the "various need") such concept has surely horrified Jung more than half century ago and it's time for us to reflect his words.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Let Us not be "Spiritually Blind", March 15, 2010
This review is from: The Undiscovered Self (Mass Market Paperback)
(I read this book some time ago, but the 'insights' from one of the reviewers prompted a response.)

Whoever cautions against discussing politics and religion should simply place their interests elsewhere, otherwise a great danger awaits them in these pages: opposing thoughts, the bane of an ungrounded yet overly-opinionated mind!

This deceptively slim tome represents a distillation of Jung's work, a succinct expression that only dedication and honesty can bring out of one's lifetime efforts. What could be more preponderant during an era of rampant conformity such as ours than a bitterly ironic "self-less-ness": originality in thought and deed is discouraged (sometimes violently) if it goes against the grain of established institutional, national, or credo character; our excesses (including population) move unchecked from psyche through biosphere; not to forget the pall of an undeniably burgeoning shadow that is mass-infantilism coupling with powerful cutting edge technologies: how could we possibly stem the tide of an enantiodromia? The search for Self does not posit an extreme isolationist necessity, but it does lean very heavily towards a need to critique, to question conventional "wisdom", and to test further all of the time-tested truths--reducing them to quaint relics if they be obstinately intractable, or fail to be deepened and rejuvenated.

What a shame that another reviewer here, "Dr." W.G. Covington, Jr. (exemplar of the problem), places Jung's entire validity on whether or not he subscribes to the literal interpretation of tenets in Christianity; perhaps if Jung was "Young", he would be more credible as a visionary. Understanding Christianity as a symbolic (or at the very least, cultural) union between Creator and Creature on the one hand, or a universally immanent manifestation/transformation on the other does nothing to harm the "truth" of the matter, but neither does it mitigate the mythological significance. That is the larger point here: Jung was not anti-Christianity, but he was neither a supporter of organized [Western] religion--the Church especially; and based on the zeitgeist, he saw the negative portents of stale and dogmatic spirituality becoming the pretexts hastening the very evils that our childishly-external belief system is desired to fend off!

Thoreau once wrote: "It is for want of a man that there are so many men." Those words are truer now then at inception, in today's world where pseudo-individuality is a cult following viewed on "reality programs". Some choose the surface of the persona, others the recesses of the group; but where in the middle-ground is the individual, the social-rebel?
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Work of genius, September 27, 2011
By 
Sarah Nicolaou (Kingscliff, NSW, AU) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Undiscovered Self (Mass Market Paperback)
This is probably one of the most important books I have ever read. The man was a genius and also very courageous to share his worlds view in such an eloquent way. I reread this book all the time, sometimes in full but sometimes just open it up and reflect. I highly recommend it!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars GREAT LITTLE BOOK!, January 6, 2011
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This review is from: The Undiscovered Self (Mass Market Paperback)
This little book most likely reflects the culmination of Jung's thoughts on the individual and society after more than 60 years of work and reflection.

It juxtaposes the role of the individual and that of society. With penatrating insights into the nature of society, Jung expounds that society is really dependent on the individual and not the other way around. This fact is easily forgotten when we think of ourselves as small gogs in a big wheel. Jung states that the individual is the only reality and that when there is no opportunity for growth on the individual level society as a whole is bound for failure.

There are many subtle and imperceptible forces operating in modern society that are antithetical to the individual. Unless each individual is capable of living his life with his own developed conscience society is bound for painful and unforseen disasters. The power for individual development is to be found from within and in so doing the individual is capable or mastering his own destiny.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great piece, August 24, 2013
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This review is from: The Undiscovered Self (Mass Market Paperback)
It is a great book. That leads you towards the brilliant mind of Carl Jung. you get to learn first hand about his ideas without any interpretation of others.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Gem for Discovering the Unconscious, July 11, 2012
This review is from: The Undiscovered Self (Mass Market Paperback)
This book is a great book about the separation of the conscious and the unconscious mind, and the consequences of the repression of unconscious ("the undiscovered self"), especially prevalent at that time and still very much so. Certainly he talks about the effects of the Soviet Union and how it is due to repression, but this is really a book about the process of individualization; not about the Soviet Union.

The State is replacing God, Jung points out, and it can be seen today as the United States becomes more socialist and Europe is openly so. While religion has stayed relatively strong in America, in many European countries Atheists are the majority. This repression and replacement of God by the State is a disaster, and can be seen even in various facets in the United States in the environmentalist movement, but most so in the replacement of God by science and reason.

Severe repression of the unconscious is extremely dangerous as it will always come out again and is still there (as noted by Freud), and can also be seen in this consciousness's experience. The confrontation with the unconscious is devastating, but signifies the road to recovery. This book talks about the repressed unconscious, but not about how to do deal with them or to get through them. Still, it is helpful for somehow going through a physic disturbance.

The unconscious can be so dangerous if repressed that nuclear warfare was quite a possibility, as it was during that time, and repression of individuality in the collectivist movement (a current fad in the United States) is a psychological disaster, as is the movement of ego-inflation ("self-esteem")-which blocks realistic self-knowledge. To know yourself is frequently swept under the rug as something unimportant or even selfish, but only through knowing your unconscious can it be reached. Something worth mentioning is if perhaps the reason for the widening gulf between the unconscious and the conscious and decreased religion is due to a decrease of either self-knowledge, or to a decrease in religious interest, something Jung does not go into in the book.

A very fascinating book to read and a crucial book for understanding yourself.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Tiny paperback with a Big punch., December 8, 2010
By 
Peter R. (New Jersey, USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Undiscovered Self (Mass Market Paperback)
When I got this book from the mailbox, I was shocked. Oh my god, so tiny. I was looking forward to a larger, meaty book. That is because, in my old age, there is some glamour and charm in having a standard sized hardcover. Well, this was my only disappointment. The contents were excellent. You'll like the reading, of course. Jung has a great sense of WISDOM and MATURITY in his writings. Just a few sentences and your mind blasts off into another level of awareless. The intellect is a great cloud to be living in. He is that cloud. This books takes you there, and keeps you there. Wow.

But, in all fairness, the small paperback book worked well for me at the local coffee shop. Easy to handle. Great reading.
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The Undiscovered Self
The Undiscovered Self by Carl Gustav Jung (Mass Market Paperback - February 7, 2006)
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