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The Unfinished Revolution: How the Modernisers Saved the Labour Party Paperback – September 1, 1999


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 434 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group (September 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0349111774
  • ISBN-13: 978-0349111773
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 1.3 x 7.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,931,411 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

'Undoubtedly one of the most fascinating accounts of how the modernisers changed the Labour Party and made it electable.' MAIL ON SUNDAY 'Intriguing.' GUARDIAN 'Lively and revealing...the best insider's account yet.' EVENING STANDARD 'An edgy, pacy narrative.' GLASGOW HERALD 'I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to understand the guts of this government' Andrew Marr, OBSERVER 'The most important guide to New Labour that has yet appeared' Bruce Anderson, SPECTATOR 'A fascinating story of high politics, with telling portraits of all the principals, from a man who has been at the centre of Labour's journey since 1985' THE TIMES

About the Author

Philip Gould is senior strategic adviser to Tony Blair, and runs his own political consultancy. He lives with his wife, Gail Rebuck, and their two children in North London.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Tom Howard on January 26, 2001
Format: Paperback
An insider's guide to Tony Blair and his colleagues' revolutionary overhaul of the British political system. With an insider's view of British politics, Gould perfects what so few of his contemporaries could achieve with their broadbrush generalisations from the media and outside new Labour.
Alongside Tony Blair and Peter Mandelson, Gould helped make Labour electable for the first time in a generation. Having seen Britain's improved relations with both America and the European Union since then, the world can safely say it has been a positive experience.
A classic
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Partly a personal telling, partly a macro look at UK politics leading to New Labour's crushing victories and downfall, this is an excellent account of what brought about the need for Blairite New Labour and the mistakes made.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
"The Unfinished Revolution: How New Labour Changed British Politics For Ever"
by Philip Gould

Philip Gould, king of spin, rebranded New Labour in Britain, replaced opinion polls with "focus" groups, and was one of the architects of Tony Blair's success. British Labour turned its back on the past "conceded and moved on" arguing that there was no point in fighting ideological battles that had already been lost, or issues that did not resonate with the voters.

Even while claiming day-to-day news coverage mattered much less than laying deep themes of objectives and achievement, Gould could stoop to develop the idea of "symbolic policies", such as minor initiatives to symbolize Labour's concern for the environment. "After all political statements are not acts of sense, they are acts of war, which sums up my feeling about a campaign: it's a fight to political death, with only one winner."

To avoid getting trapped on the Conservative's ground he was prepared to agree where Labour could only lose, fighting only where Labour could win. More than just defeat the Conservatives on the grounds of competence, integrity and fitness to govern, Labour must change the tide of ideas. The ultimate foundation of the Labour party is not dogma, or even values, it is the hopes and aspirations of ordinary people.

The concept of the "Third Way" was based on instincts drawn from both Left and Right but moved beyond them both. People had outgrown Left and Right long before the politicians did. One of the preoccupations of Old Labour was a preoccupation with what the public often saw as "bizarre" issues: homosexuals, immigrants, feminists, lesbians, putting money into peculiar things.
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