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The Unheard Cry for Meaning: Psychotherapy and Humanism (Touchstone Books) Paperback – March 27, 1979


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Editorial Reviews

Review

''Emphasizes the importance of helping people to find meaning in their lives and thus to live at their fullest potential. And--needless to say--those who live fully have neither fear of life nor fear of death.'' --Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, MD

Praise for Man's Search for Meaning:
''If you read but one book this year, Dr. Frankl's book should be that one.'' --Los Angeles Times

Praise for Man's Search for Meaning:
''If you read but one book this year, Dr. Frankl's book should be that one.'' --Los Angeles Times --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Viktor E. Frankl is Professor of Neurology and Psychiatry at the University of Vienna Medical School and Distinguished Professor of Logotherapy at the US International University. He is the founder of what has come to be called the Third Viennese School of Psychotherapy (after Freud's psychoanalysis and Adler's individual psychology)—the school of logotherapy.

Born in 1905, Dr. Frankl received the degrees of Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Vienna. During World War II he spent three years at Auschwitz, Dachau and other concentration camps.

Dr. Frankl first published in 1924 in the International Journal of Psychoanalysis and has since published twenty-six books, which have been translated into nineteen languages, including Japanese and Chinese. He has been a visiting professor at Harvard, Duquesne, and Southern Methodist Universities. Honorary Degrees have been conferred upon him by Loyola University in Chicago, Edgecliff College, Rockford College, and Mount Mary College, as well as by universities in Brazil and Venezuela. He has been a guest lecturer at universities throughout the world and has made fifty-one lecture tours throughout the United States alone. He is President of the Austrian Medical Society of Psychotherapy.
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Product Details

  • Series: Touchstone Books
  • Paperback: 196 pages
  • Publisher: Touchstone (March 27, 1979)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671247360
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671247362
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.5 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #314,956 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Viktor E. Frankl was professor of neurology and psychiatry at the University of Vienna Medical School until his death in 1997. He was the founder of what has come to be called the Third Viennese School of Psychotherapy (after Freud's psychoanalysis and Adler's individual psychology)--the school of logotherapy.

Born in 1905, Dr. Frankl received the degrees of Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Vienna. During World War II he spent three years at Auschwitz, Dachau and other concentration camps.

Dr. Frankl first published in 1924 in the International Journal of Psychoanalysis and has since published twenty-six books, which have been translated into nineteen languages, including Japanese and Chinese. He was a visiting professor at Harvard, Duquesne, and Southern Methodist Universities. Honorary Degrees have been conferred upon him by Loyola University in Chicago, Edgecliff College, Rockford College, and Mount Mary College, as well as by universities in Brazil and Venezuela. He was a guest lecturer at universities throughout the world and made fifty-one lecture tours throughout the United States alone. He was President of the Austrian Medical Society of Psychotherapy.


Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

75 of 77 people found the following review helpful By Muhammad Pyran Hewitt on July 2, 2006
Format: Paperback
This was a wonderful book. I highly recommend it immediately after you read Man's Search for Meaning. This is a continuation and extension of the Introduction to Logotherapy that comprises the second half of Man's Search for Meaning. This book is more academic and less personal, but still full of insight and humanity. Frankl touches on many different aspects of life and existential vacuums that we all face. Here are some of his remarks that I thought perticularly noteworthy and that will give you a feel for the overall nature of this work.

Frankl's Definition of God

"God is the partner of your most intimate soliloquies. Whenever you are talking to yourself in utmost sincerity and ultimate solitude-he to whom you are addressing yourself may justifiably be called God." {NB: This is in the context of a non-theistic statement, Frankl notes that a religious person would assert that these are real dialogues between himself and God, while an atheist would be equally correct in insisting that they are only monologues within his own mind. Frankl, himself, I think tends toward the latter position.}

Frankl, Viktor. "Determinism and Humanism: Critique of Pan-Determinism" The Unheard Cry for Meaning. pg. 63.

Self-Trancendence

"Man is - by virtue of the self-trancendent quality of the human reality - basically concerned with reaching out beyond himself, be it toward a meaning to fulfill, or toward another human being to lovingly encounter."

Frankl, Viktor. "Determinism and Humanism: Critique of Pan-Determinism" The Unheard Cry for Meaning. pg. 80.
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Taylor Gillespie on April 7, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I don't want to exaggerate and say this book changed my life, but it has had an incredible impact on my personal philosophy. It's just an amazing book. If existentialism and psychology made a love child, this would be it. I'm still not sure why he isn't more known. Everyone could benefit from his brilliant thoughts. I have major depression and his work has helped me say yes to life.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Don Nguyen on June 18, 2003
Format: Paperback
This is a book about finding meaning in life. The book makes a very clear distinction between having a successful life and having a meaningful life. Frankl uses many good examples to illustrate the difference between the two. He cites Harvard graduates, many of whom lead successful lives yet at the same time are overpowered by a sense of futility. Although they have achieved financial and social success, their lives are lacking genuine fulfillment.
The second and third chapters of the book are slightly confusing. The second chapter is a critique of pan-determinism. Although many of his arguments seem compelling, unfortunately he does not explain the definition of pan-determinism so a lot of the chapter was unintelligible. The third chapter is a critique of pure encounter, and suffers from the same problems as the second.
The book addresses a number of interesting issues. The books asks "How can life have meaning when human existence is such a temporary affair?" The book also points out that in an increasingly affluent society, people have more time and money to spend but nothing meaningful on which to spend it. The part of the book I enjoyed most was this quote from Ludwig von Bertalanffy
"The expanding economy of the `affluent society' could not subsist without such manipulation. Only by manipulating humans ever more into Skinnerian rats, robots, buying automata, homeostatically adjusted conformers and opportunists can this great society follow its progress toward ever increasing gross national product."
The above quote illustrates how we have been duped into believing that materialism is the path to meaning and happiness in life. However, this is not the truth but merely an illusion fed to us by clever manipulators.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on February 26, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Great perspective for the psychology of being happy and fulfilled. Frankl astutely points out that happiness is a relative condition and that having an inner sense of an all encompassing sense of purpose that has worth to you makes even the most horrible conditions and bad things that happen to you endurable. Refreshing respite from Freud, Jung, Skinner, Rogers, et al Belabored the introduction some.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By John Gay on July 2, 2013
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If yopu only read 10 books in your life, this should be one of them. An amazing story by an extreamly amazing man.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Diana L. Ross on July 14, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I think Frankl's ideas are closer to my truths than anything I've read lately. But why have no followers updated his work? it's distracting from his theories to read outdated stuff. I don't have words to explain how it feels to connect with thoughts you gather have been abandoned because no one bothered to create a modern version of logotheraphy--which seems strangely misnamed in the sense that it carries no force in the world today.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on April 16, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I can't say enough about this book. He truly hits the nail on the head with what is wrong with America. I read a lot of psych books because I have loved it since I was young. There is something so simplistic abut Frankl. Well worth your time to read.
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