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The Universe Versus Alex Woods [Kindle Edition]

Gavin Extence
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (239 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $15.00
Kindle Price: $8.89
You Save: $6.11 (41%)
Sold by: Hachette Book Group

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Book Description

A rare meteorite struck Alex Woods when he was ten years old, leaving scars and marking him for an extraordinary future. The son of a fortune teller, bookish, and an easy target for bullies, Alex hasn't had the easiest childhood.

But when he meets curmudgeonly widower Mr. Peterson, he finds an unlikely friend. Someone who teaches him that that you only get one shot at life. That you have to make it count.

So when, aged seventeen, Alex is stopped at customs with 113 grams of marijuana, an urn full of ashes on the front seat, and an entire nation in uproar, he's fairly sure he's done the right thing ...

Introducing a bright young voice destined to charm the world, The Universe Versus Alex Woods is a celebration of curious incidents, astronomy and astrology, the works of Kurt Vonnegut and the unexpected connections that form our world.



Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

An Amazon Best Book of the Month, July 2013: Quirky only begins to describe this incredibly touching tale of an epileptic British misfit science geek who befriends an aging American Vietnam War vet. As the book begins, Alex is a teenage boy, arrested and being questioned by the authorities. What happened? How did he get here? Who is this kid? Do we even like him? Debut novelist Gavin Extence dangles these questions before us, then cleverly leads us backwards in order to answer them. The story (and therefore our journey) starts years before, when young Alex was randomly, life-alteringly struck in the head by a meteorite, rendering him both a scientific celebrity and a school yard outcast. Kurt Vonnegut's influence is obvious within specific plot points, and is also noticeable in Extence's writing, where he strikes a balance of describing tragic events with comedic style, wrapping his seriousness within subtle absurdity. Specifically, his attention to bullying is distinct, yet unsanctimonious. By the time we're back in the interrogation room, our questions about Alex have been well answered, but a bigger question demands our attention: How far would you go for a friend? --Robin A. Rothman

About the Author

Gavin Extence was born in 1982 and grew up in the interestingly named village of Swineshead, Lincolnshire. From the ages of 5-11, he enjoyed a brief but illustrious career as a chess player, winning numerous national championships and travelling to Moscow and St Petersburg to pit his wits against the finest young minds in Russia. He won only one game. Gavin is currently working on his second novel. When he is not writing, he enjoys cooking, amateur astronomy and going to Alton Towers.

Product Details

  • File Size: 872 KB
  • Print Length: 427 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 031624659X
  • Publisher: Redhook (May 21, 2013)
  • Sold by: Hachette Book Group
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B009CJN9V2
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #83,114 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
63 of 69 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A terrific book February 3, 2013
Format:Kindle Edition
I thought this was a terrific book. It is funny, thoughtful, touching and profound in its way, and I found it utterly engrossing as a story. It is hard to give any account of the plot without giving away more that I would have liked to know before I started, but it is narrated by Alex, a serious, studious seventeen-year-old in England. He forms an unlikely friendship which leads him in a very unexpected and challenging direction - which sounds thoroughly corny, sentimental and cliché-ed, and isn't any of those things. It is an engaging, funny and touching story with some important things to say.

Alex has a fantastically well-realised narrative voice, with very penetrating observations to make about lots of things, all of which are deadpan and as a result are often funny as well as being very shrewd. For example, of his mother, a clairvoyant, he says: "...my mother revealed that she'd foreseen the entire catastrophe. Of course, she didn't realise that she'd foreseen the entire catastrophe until after it had happened." There are many examples of this sort of thing, and I loved it. I found echoes of Mark Haddon's The Curious Case of the Dog in the Nighttime in Alex's voice, which is high praise indeed. Other characters are very believable and beautifully portrayed, and all have their own very distinctive and recognisable traits and voices. The story is excellently structured and paced, and I found myself utterly bound up in this book and it eventually hijacked my day because I couldn't bear not to finish it.

This is one of the best and most memorable books I have read for some time - very warmly recommended indeed.
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41 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Extraordinary Book March 23, 2013
Format:Kindle Edition
This is a quite extraordinary book. I think it is fair to say that had I read a full synopsis of the content before I started reading I would probably not have bothered since it is certainly not the sort of book I would expect to enjoy. This would have been a big mistake and very much my loss as this is an unusual story which gets the attention at the outset and is a fascinating read throughout.

I will not go into much detail on the story as there is a danger here of spoiling it for future readers. However, the main plot is about an unlikely friendship between Alex Woods, who is at school, and an elderly American whom he meets, Mr Peterson. It covers a period of about five years from when Alex is 12 to aged 17. Alex is from an unusual background, having a witch for a mother and having also being in the unlikely position of having survived being hit by a meteorite. Mr Peterson is a dour, veteran of the Vietnam War. The relationship between them builds very gradually but is complex and very meaningful.

This is a tale which is quite poignant in parts, but with plenty of humor mixed in. The end manages to be both sad and uplifting which is quite a difficult feat for an author to accomplish. Certainly I felt at the end that I would have liked to be able to read more in the same vein, but this book is very much a one off so it is unlikely that there will be more. However, it is certainly a read which most will enjoy and certainly I found myself thinking about the issues raised once I had finished, which is always a sign of a story which has had quite an impact.
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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
Format:Hardcover
If Gavin Extence keeps writing and developing as a fiction author, I'm very excited to see where his imagination takes him (and us). This first book is a good start, but is most significant for me as a harbinger of things to come.

"The Universe Versus Alex Woods" is very episodic.....this happens, then that, then this, etc. For this style of book to be stellar, the magic in the style of writing itself has to carry things. Kurt Vonnegut (Extence's self-proclaimed hero) was a master of sparkling, wonderous writing. Even though Vonnegut's books had more wild flights of fancy than just a meteorite hitting someone (which is the one fanciful conceit of "...Woods"), I always felt like he could have written about almost anything and still had me enthralled, through the sheer wonder of his writing style. I have every reason to believe that Extence is going to reach that type of writing in his career, probably sooner rather than later, but he isn't there yet in this, his first novel.

The characters are potentially interesting, but not fully realized. Ripe plot developments are teed up, but never really pursued. Overall, the read is pleasant and I did enjoy the book. But I realized about a third of the way through that this is an author I'm likely to love in the future, but he hasn't put it all together yet. I sense there may be a much more interesting and idiosyncratic writer underneath this book, waiting to get out. I hope Extence lets him roam free and wild for the next one. I look forward to seeing where this talented and intelligent writer takes his craft.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
By Mel B.
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
This story begins with an ending. You're not quite sure where the protagonist is coming from -- he's young and clearly in a lot of trouble with the police. I was worried that Alex -- called Lex by his mother, and not entirely coincidentally also bald -- would turn to an unsympathetic character. I hate those -- people who are horrible and make terrible decisions. But no, Alex, while making a series of decisions not everyone agrees with, is an entirely moral and compassionate young man.

He's notorious because as a young boy, he was hit by a meteor and recovered after a two week coma, but not without consequences. He gets severe epilepsy, enough that it keeps him out of school for a year. Then he goes to school where he's bullied because he's different; isn't that the way?

I like how Alex figures stuff out and often lists it -- such as ways he doesn't fit in or how his friend Mr. Peterson needs help making a critical decision.

What I appreciated is that our precocious protagonist is real. He makes mistakes that seem genuine -- you could easily have made them. He also in the process of learning about life and literature, about how to control his own unsound brain and how watching someone he loves die.

I love that a major thread of the book is Kurt Vonnegut, absurdity, and secular humanism. I totally want to join The Secular Church of Kurt Vonnegut.

Alex learns from his friend, Mr. Peterson, an irascible war veteran who'd rather be left alone. Alex and Mr. Peterson rail against each other in a way that's hilarious -- Alex won't bring him certain kinds of music in the hospital, because he's not ready for it.

This book was a library ebook loan, and I loved it so much that I bought it. That's the highest praise, trust me.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars I really enjoyed this book
I really enjoyed this book. It was an odd tale about some unusual characters, and I really enjoyed the pace and tone of the book as well as the overall story. Read more
Published 10 days ago by Jamia Hill
4.0 out of 5 stars ... book club and apart from one person we all enjoyed it. The...
This was the choice for our monthly book club and apart from one person we all enjoyed it.
The characters were interesting and so was the plot lin

This was our book... Read more
Published 20 days ago by Jocasta20
4.0 out of 5 stars Compelling
Such beautiful writing; unique characterization; a joy to read! It would be great to have a sequel that follows Alex through university.
Published 21 days ago by Catherine
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
Tragic comedy at its best, really enjoyed the characters and story line.
Published 23 days ago by Jane Allan
5.0 out of 5 stars love it
I Could not put it down. Great story great writing. Loved it. Would read it again & recommend to others.
Published 23 days ago by Jamuna
5.0 out of 5 stars Satisfying
This is a warm and thought provoking book. Euthanasia is a good topic to discuss and this book makes it approachable
Published 25 days ago by Coconutreader
5.0 out of 5 stars ... had to look up in the dictionary (which I like! )
The writing style was clear and interesting with words I had to look up in the dictionary (which I like!). Read more
Published 27 days ago by WENDY CLEASE
3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars
A little like an essay on epilepsy and euthanasia, but I enjoyed the main character.
Published 1 month ago by matt
4.0 out of 5 stars Really liked the book
A very enjoyable read, a quirky story and well developed main characters. Really liked the book!
Published 1 month ago by Polly Barnes
5.0 out of 5 stars a good read for all
Absolutely lovely and uplifting without the least hint of soppy formulaic pap. Literary and human, a good read for all.
Published 2 months ago by Pamela Shannon
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