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The Untold 60s: When Hope Was Born [Kindle Edition]

Alex Gross
4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $29.95
Kindle Price: $9.99
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Book Description

This is the "at last it can be told" story of the Sixties by
the one person capable of writing it. Effortlessly moving
in its first-person narrative from London's rock scene
to Berlin's student radicals to Amsterdam's practical
pranksters to a whole range of American causes and
crises, the author provides the definitive answer to a
soon-to-be-disgraced vice-president's claim that all
the national movements of the Sixties were guided by
an international conspiracy--"to the extent that there
was any such plot, it was probably me."

It is three books in one--combining elements of spy
story and time-travel adventure, it is ultimately a
responsible history of a remarkable era. This book
explains once and for all how hope was born,
struggled against all odds, and ultimately prevailed
during the Sixties, only to be forgotten by later
generations. And how such hope can be rekindled
again today.

During the Sixties the author wrote for and occasionally
edited major underground newspapers in London, New
York, Berlin, and Amsterdam. He was also the principal
founder of the Art Workers Coalition, a group of radical
artists who demonstrated in New York and elsewhere.
Almost all of "The Untold Sixties" was written during
the mid-Seventies, when these events were still fresh in
the author's mind, bringing the reader remarkably close
to reliving the Sixties in all their intensity.

"Alex is a reporter. His attentive eyewitness account is
a basic document by a trained and knowledgeable observer.
At the same time, he was a partisan, and his writing is
relentlessly personal. The reader really feels it...”it” being
the texture of cultural politics, the sizzle of social
change...a book like this is of inestimable value in
opening the locked dusty doors of our useful pasts."
--Preface, Alan W. Moore, ABC No Rio

Excerpts from some early reviews...

5.0 out of 5 stars

Claudia Dreifus, Journalist, Senior Fellow, World Policy Institute (US):

Before bloggers and the Internet, there was the underground press of the 1960s. Alex Gross, who covered the art scene for the grand-daddy of all the underground newspapers, the East Village Other, was at the center of the story. This book is how he saw it. And lived it!

Midwest Book Review (US):

5 out of 5 stars
Well worth the read for those looking to get a better understanding of the decade, February 9, 2010

The ideas of hope and change reside side by side, and have been for over fifty years. "The Untold 60s: When Hope Was Born" discusses the birth of hope and its union with change, as throughout the world, it was rapidly changing. Revolution was the name of the game, and whether it was the military-driven revolution of Vietnam, the social revolution of the western world, Alex Gross gives readers his own personal views of life in an era where one day was radically different than the next. "The Untold 60s" is well worth the read for those looking to get a better understanding of the decade.

By Graham Keen, Editor, IT, 1968-70 (UK):

I knew Alex in the Sixties. He would come bustling in to the office of International Times in London, where I worked on the layouts, from god-nose where, spilling manuscripts, good humour and intelligence in equal parts and vitalising the atmosphere with the excitement of his enthusiasms. Reading his wonderful account The Untold Sixties, has revealed the other pieces of his kaleidoscopic life and good times that I never knew about.

Alex has a wide ranging cultural embrace, from New York to Italy, to London, to Paris, to Berlin and back again, and the book is an important counter-cultural insight into those turbulent and heady times when those cities throbbed with the energy and invention of the disaffected. Even if you weren't there, he makes you feel you should have been.

MORE REVIEWS & SAMPLE CHAPTERS:
www.untoldsixties.net

Editorial Reviews

Review

When Hope Was Born, 29 Dec 2009 By Mr. Arthur F. G. Keen (Graham Keen) (Battle, East Sussex, Uk) -

I knew Alex in the Sixties. He would come bustling in to the office of International Times in London, where I worked on the layouts, from god-nose where, spilling manuscripts, good humour and intelligence in equal parts and vitalising the atmosphere with the excitement of his enthusiasms. Reading his wonderful account The Untold Sixties, has revealed the other pieces of his kaleidoscopic life and good times that I never knew about. His primary interest was in theatre and playwriting but he found himself in demand to translate contemporary German playwrights for the British stage. His revelations of how things worked or screwed-up, behind the scenes of the British theatre, the established Royal Shakespeare Company and the more avant garde Royal Court, with their prejudices and their infighting and their attempts to keep abreast of the European scene are enthralling.

He has a fascination with language and his chapter on American-English and English-English and the love-hate relationship between our cultures is another unexpected delight of this cornucopia of a book.

Alex has a wide ranging cultural embrace, from New York to Italy, to London, to Paris, to Berlin and back again, and the book is an important counter-cultural insight into those turbulent and heady times when those cities throbbed with the energy and invention of the disaffected. Even if you weren't there, he makes you feel you should have been. ---Graham Keen --Graham Keen, former graphics editor, IT (International Times), London

"Before bloggers and the Internet, there was the underground press of the 1960s. Alex Gross, who covered the art scene for the grand-daddy of all the underground newspapers, the East Village Other, was at the center of the story. This book is how he saw it. And lived it!" --Claudia Dreifus, Journalist, Senior Fellow, World Policy Institute

From the Back Cover

"Alex is a reporter. His attentive eyewitness account is a basic document by a trained and knowledgeable observer. At the same time, he was a partisan, and his writing is relentlessly personal. The reader really feels it..."it" being the texture of cultural politics, the sizzle of social change...a book like this is of inestimable value in opening the locked dusty doors of our useful pasts."
--Alan W. Moore, ABC No Rio

Product Details

  • File Size: 1320 KB
  • Print Length: 724 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0982317808
  • Publisher: Cross-Cultural Research Project; 2 edition (July 21, 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003WQASQK
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,397,668 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
(5)
4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well-told '60s December 10, 2009
Format:Paperback
TRUE TO ITS TITLE, The Untold Sixties (Cross-Cultural Research Projects, New York)offers a rare insight into how the "underground" alternate society in Europe blended with its counterpart in America and confirms how its author, Alex Gross, is the perfect person to report the story.
Arriving in London in the `60s he and his girl friend Ilene seeing themselves as "outsiders" would joke about how the Thirties seemed to be still alive in England. Satire was permitted but anything more incisive banned by the libel laws and public inertia
It was a time of offshore pirate radio stations presenting the latest tunes from "those four Liverpudlians" but music and the miniskirt were early stirrings of the change that was to come
Gross became fond of Hyde Park's Speakers Corner where "every possible point of view proclaimed in every regional accent"--anarchists, poets, black spokesmen and just plain crazies. Two years later just before the underground press was born, many of these lost and wandering souls coalesced around the Arts Lab, started by a catalytic American expatriate from Louisiana Jim Haynes.
At last there was a meeting place for the young and hip to meet and Haynes' presence was an example of how London life was being transformed by "outsiders"--Bill Levy, an American who later edited IT, Britain's first underground paper; Australian Richard Neville (OZ magazine) and Gross himself in addition to numerous others.
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5.0 out of 5 stars He was THERE! February 7, 2012
Format:Paperback
Alex Gross was at the heart of the East Village Other. He was there. This is one of the few authentic insider's reports on the underground press movement of the 1960s.
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Format:Paperback
I've read many books on the sixties that covered the USA scene and London and the world of the International Times (IT) and have had the pleasure of meeting some of the notable characters in the London world that Alex covers here. This covers a broad range of topics from the East Village, underground press, London, Berlin, the CIA and the art and theater worlds.

The chapter on Harvey Matusow's trip to eastern Germany with Alex is one of the most unusual stories I came across in my work on a documentary on Matusow and led to my meeting Alex and Ilene to talk about Harvey, London, Germany, IT and EVO.

His perspective on the counter-culture movements in New York, London and Berlin are fascinating, and what surprised me was how interesting the theater world and and artist's movement in New York got me interested in topics I hadn't really expected to find so engrossing, as were his theories on how language is influenced culturally, and how he learned and adapted using his fascination with language.

Overall this is a broad ranging life story told with passion, written and reflected on over decades, and one gets a sense of Alex's sense of urgency in trying to change the world, then and now. It's a huge effort and it gives a context and overview and sense of connectedness between the locations that I've not found in any other single book. I found it informative and inspirational.
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3.0 out of 5 stars invisible art January 22, 2010
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
a great idea but since evo was half illustratons and the best underground cartoons of the time, since kim deitch and spain rodriguez got the gothic blimp works out and the pictures were the best of any other underground paper, why is the only mention of any artist r.crumb? marc grabler
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
The ideas of hope and change reside side by side, and have been for over fifty years. "The Untold 60s: When Hope Was Born" discusses the birth of hope and its union with change, as throughout the world, it was rapidly changing. Revolution was the name of the game, and whether it was the military-driven revolution of Vietnam, the social revolution of the western world, Alex Gross gives readers his own personal views of life in an era where one day was radically different than the next. "The Untold 60s" is well worth the read for those looking to get a better understanding of the decade.
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