Industrial-Sized Deals Best Books of the Month Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_plcc_6M_fly_beacon $5 Albums Fire TV Stick Grocery Find the Best Purina Pro Plan for Your Pet Shop Popular Services tmnt tmnt tmnt  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Metal Gear Solid 5 Big Savings in the Amazon Fall Sportsman Event Deal of the Day
Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.com (US).
  
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • The Up Escalator
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

The Up Escalator

22 customer reviews

See all 22 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Audio CD, March 10, 2009
$29.98 $28.99

Editorial Reviews

Although already a veteran of the English pub-rock scene when his first solo record came out in 1976, his American record label decided to market Graham Parker in the same 'angry young man' vein as fellow countryman Elvis Costello. The fact of the matter is that Parker had more in common with the likes of Van Morrison and the Rolling Stones than the punk scene that he was being equated with. The Up Escalator, Parker's fifth studio release (and last with his great backing band, The Rumour), features a duet with Bruce Springsteen and more of the gritty, non-nonsense rock & roll that made Graham a darling of the rock critics. A must have!


1. No Holding Back
2. Devils Sidewalk
3. Stupefication
4. Empty Lives
5. The Beating Of Another Heart
6. Endless Nights
7. Paralyzed
8. Manueovers
9. Jolie Jolie
10. Love Without Greed

Product Details

  • Audio CD (March 10, 2009)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: AMERICAN BEAT
  • ASIN: B001OSC4A6
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #367,929 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Caratzas on July 21, 2001
Format: Audio CD
I wholeheartedly agree with reviewer Prymel's thoughts (see review below): `The Up Escalator' is a woefully underappreciated gem - and would definitely get the nod as my favorite Graham Parker and the Rumour album. While `Squeezing Out Sparks' is lauded left and right - and is probably the only one of Parker's discs a casual fan could name - `The Up Escalator' has languished in obscurity, despite all the makings of a breakthrough album.
Consider: Producer Jimmy Iovine (Tom Petty's `Damn the Torpedoes', Dire Straits' `Making Movies', Bruce Springsteen's `Born to Run') brings his breathtaking panoramic sound to the table, recording the musicians live in the studio - giving the album his telltale larger-than-life stamp. This is an ideal compliment to the Rumour's superb backing, as they were always a top-notch live band. The guitar parts are interlocking like gears, and the rhythm section sounds crisp and clear - sidestepping the muddy production that often afflicted earlier GP+R releases.
Springsteen himself contributes backing vocals to the great (and Sprignsteen-esque) "Endless Night". E Street Band member Danny Federici (organ) and noted session pianist Nicky Hopkins (The Rolling Stones' `Exile on Main Street', The Who's `By Numbers') replace departed Rumour keyboardist Bob Andrews, providing their signature sounds to the proceedings.
The songs are all simultaneously catchy and full of vitriol, ranking them among Parker's best. As Prymel astutely notes, every song has an infectious hook, with "No Holding Back", "Stupefaction", and "Jolie Jolie" taking top honors. The album's centerpiece, "Empty Lives", is a bile-spewing rail seemingly directed against everyone within listening distance who has ever questioned Parker's abilities - and kept him from the stardom he deserved. As a piece of sonic and lyrical outrage, it is almost without peer.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By "prymel" on April 27, 2001
Format: Audio CD
Most Graham Parker fans gravitate towards 1979's "Squeezing Out Sparks" as his finest achievment, but I respectfully disagree. "The Up Escalator" has been one of my favorite rock/pop albums ever since it was released; it's incredible to me that this album never received greater recognition. It is filled with wonderfully melodic, intelligently constructed rock that is an absolute joy to listen to. Virtually every song has a killer hook, with "No Holding Back" and "Jolie Jolie" being particularly vibrant standouts. I was thrilled to see this album being reissued. Pick this one up if you can, it's simply fantastic.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Tim Brough VINE VOICE on March 27, 2008
Format: Audio CD
This should have been Graham Parker's ride to stardom. Consider: He'd just come off a career best with Squeezing out Sparks, finally cracked the American market, had his record company squarely behind him, and they'd teamed him up with super-producer Jimmy Iovine (Tom Petty, Bruce Springsteen). Parker even had a couple ace songs ready to go, with "Stupefaction" cracking the top 100. But the album faltered. While a good album overall, as GP albums go, it's a less than well remembered effort. What happened?

Part of the blame goes to Iovine. Where he managed to harness the widescreen vision and kinetic energy of both Petty and Springsteen, here the music seems restrained and muted. The clean, cutting bite that flamed from the grooves on "Squeezing Out Sparks" is muddled here, one dimensional. The much ballyhooed collaboration with Springsteen came on a song that made little sense. Bob Andrews' departure sapped some of the character from the sound; Nicky Hopkins' piano sounds phoned in, even distracting on the otherwise fine "The Beating Of Another Heart,"

That's not to say the songs are bad, some rank among Parker's best. To this day the memory of GP and The Rumour giving a camera melting performance of "Empty Lives" on the late-night show "Fridays" strikes me as one of the most incredible live rock moments on television. Both "No Holding Back" and "Stupefaction" are engaging, while, for all its banality, "Endless Night" kicks. Throughout the album, The Rumour plays it sharp and solid, even if the murky production has them fighting for air. Momentum made this album match the #40 chart peak of "Sparks," but it couldn't maintain the fascination that the earlier album did.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Scott Lindholm on August 15, 1998
Format: Audio CD
Most critics look to "Howlin' Wind" and "Squeezing Out Sparks" as the best that Graham Parker did, and it's hard to argue with that. It's my contention that this is probably the most overlooked of his releases, and the fact that it took over 10 years to get it on CD bears that out. From the opening rave-up of "No Holding Back" through such great tunes as "Stupefaction," "Empty Lives," "No Holding Back" (yep, that's Bruce Springsteen singing backing vocals on that song--my brother the Springsteen fan never catches that), it's a great New Wave album, much as Parker didn't care for that label (or the one that lumped him with Elvis Costello and Joe Jackson as an Angry Young Man). Very little is ever mentioned about how strong a backup group the Rumour was, and, much like Elvis Costello without The Attractions, Parker did his best stuff when he had them backing him up. It's a great release, one that any Graham Parker fan should own, and a good starting point to discover an artist who never really got his share of fame.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?