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Comment: VG. Ex-Lib. All discs in VG/Like New+++ condition. 6 discs in hard clam shell case. Unabridged.
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The Upside of the Downturn: Ten Management Strategies to Prevail in the Recession and Thrive in the Aftermath Audio CD – Audiobook, CD, Unabridged


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Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Your Coach In A Box; Unabridged edition (July 1, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1596593970
  • ISBN-13: 978-1596593978
  • Product Dimensions: 5.9 x 5.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,279,529 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

 “Even as businesses prepare for difficult times they must keep an eye on the long term, trimming the fat but not the muscle and sometimes spending where it makes sense. Colvin has defined a new genre of management book: the bust-buster.”
—RICHARD DONKIN, Financial Times

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Geoff Colvin, senior editor-at-large for Fortune, writes its popular column "Value Driven." He lectures widely and is a regular lead moderator for the Fortune Global Forum. He also offers daily commentary on the CBS Radio Network. His first book, Talent Is Overrated, earned international acclaim and was a Wall Street Journal, Business Week, and New York Times business bestseller. He lives in Fairfield, Connecticut.

More About the Author

Geoff Colvin, is Fortune's senior editor-at-large and has written hundred of articles for the magazine including its popular column Value Driven. He lectures widely and is the regular lead moderator for the Fortune Global Forum. Colvin graduated Harvard cum laude with a B.A. in economics, and received his M.B.A. from New York University's Stern School. His first book, Talent Is Overrated, earned global acclaim and was a Wall Street Journal, BusinessWeek, and New York Times business bestseller. www.GeoffColvin.com

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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This is more of a buy it for an airplane book than a go to a quiet place to read type of book.
Mark P. McDonald
In response to the uproar, an office of the U.S.G.A. replied, "We're not trying to embarrass the world's greatest golfers. We're trying to identify them."
Robert Morris
This book was insightful and provided much needed perspective for these turbulent (and opportunistic) times.
A. J. LoPinto

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I took a scuba diving training course when I was a teenager so I could go diving with my brothers. Of the many helpful things I took away from that excellent course, one principle more than any of the others has found its way into every aspect of my life: "panic kills". The sudden economic changes we are going through now (and will continue to face over the coming months and years, despite rosy government predictions) too often cause us to react without careful thinking. We get the urge to do something! Anything! In order to get away from the catastrophe. But this kind of panic is exactly the wrong thing. Conversely, we can also get the urge to just sit down and wait to die. Also, a mistake and a more obvious one. But both are urges can be very strong and hard to override in order to do something more intelligent.

This book by Geoff Colvin can help you take a bit of time to rethink how you want to face this financial downturn. The Great Depression was awful for many families (including my parents' families), but for many others it created opportunities and many fortunes began during that crisis. This brief book shows you how to find a door opening instead of staring at the door that just slammed shut.

Colvin spends two chapters explaining how this downturn can present opportunities for you and your business and what the new global financial normal means.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mark P. McDonald TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 28, 2009
Format: Hardcover
The Upside of the Downturn by Jeff Colvin provides a business view of the current economic crisis and raises questions executives should be asking about their company, customers and themselves. This is one of set of books that have been coming out since Ram Charan's Leadership in an era of economic uncertainty debuted last year. The other notable book on this topic is Jim Collin's How the Mighty Fall and Paul Krugman's The Return of Depression Economics and the Crisis of 2008.

The Upside of a Downturn falls somewhere in between Charan's pointed advice directed straight at the CEO and Collins discussion of the forces that pull companies down. As such, The Upside of a Downturn provides more of a business magazine view of the economic crisis and what businesses should do rather than a hard academic or business book treatment of the subject. This view is understandable as Colvin is the Senior Editor at Fortune.

Colvin's writing is clear and the use of company examples is helpful even if some of them provide only a passing reference more than in depth analysis. Colvin peppers his view on the crisis with memorable quotes and observations that will provide you with sound bytes of wisdom.

This is a good book and worth the read. But it is more of a discourse on the events that have happened, the responses of marquee named companies and bringing together points from other parties than anything else. Colvin leverages his extensive network of contacts and interactions at Fortune as well as studies from the major business strategy-consulting firms like McKinsey and Booz, Allen etc.

Overall recommended but not a must drop everything and read now book. This is more of a buy it for an airplane book than a go to a quiet place to read type of book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michael P. Maslanka on July 3, 2009
Format: Hardcover
My mom told me that "all experiences in life are good ones, but only if you draw the right lessons from them. Otherwise, it is just something that happened to you." My mom and Colvin would have gotten along. In 171 pages, he sets out how to draw the right lessons and what to do now. Here is one gem: "they'll never forget what you do now." Think about employees, clients, vendors and your intereactions with them. How are you treating them in these dark days? If badly("hey employee you have no where to go so just thank me for keeping you around"), then they will bolt when things turn around.And don't give into what Colvin calls "ancient instincts" and resort to layoffs to solve your problems. That's like the generals who fight the last wars. Years ago, it was the role of people to make the machines run; now,the role of equipment is to enable people. So, understand that layoffs have a hugh cost, not just in severence payments but in lost intellectual capital. There is lots more. A valuable and inspiring read , not about success, but about opportunity.
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