Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Valley of the Kings: The Tombs and the Funerary of Thebes West Hardcover – September 1, 2001


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, September 1, 2001
"Please retry"
$126.04 $14.00

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

$50 Amazon.com Gift Card
Receive up to a $50 Amazon.com Gift Card for Fine Art Purchases. Restrictions apply, see offer for details.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Friedman (September 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1586632957
  • ISBN-13: 978-1586632953
  • Product Dimensions: 14.3 x 10.4 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.7 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #894,020 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Not since Kamal el-Mallakh's The Gold of Tutankhamen (1978) has such a lavish book on Ancient Egypt been offered that will appeal to both general readers and scholars. Weeks (Egyptology, American Univ., Cairo), who discovered the tomb of the sons of Rameses II, as described in his The Lost Tomb (LJ 10/1/98), has assembled an international team of experts to interpret for the nonspecialist the wonders of the Theban necropolis on the west bank of the Nile opposite modern Luxor. Unlike John Romer's recently reprinted popular classic Valley of the Kings, the title in this case is somewhat misleading since, in addition to the most significant tombs in the Valley of the Kings, the survey similarly covers the Valley of the Queens, the royal valley mortuary temples, and the tombs of the nobles, all dating to the New Kingdom (ca. 1570-1070 B.C.E.). The large trim size gives best advantage to the more than 800 incomparable color illustrations, some on fold-out pages. Plans and cutaway reconstructions help orient the reader for an exciting virtual tour. The bibliography is scholarly but also contains popular titles. A spectacular achievement; highly recommended for all public and academic libraries. Edward K. Werner, St. Lucie Cty. Lib. Syst., Ft. Pierce, FL

Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

Thebes is one of the largest and best-known archaeological sites in the world, located about 560 miles south of Cairo on the banks of the Nile River. On the east bank, beneath the modern city of Luxor, lie the remains of an ancient town that from 1500 to 1000 B.C. was one of the most spectacular in Egypt, with a population of perhaps 50,000. Within it the Egyptians built the huge temple complexes of Karnak and Luxor, two of the largest religious structures ever constructed. On the west bank lies the Theban necropolis, in which archaeologists have found thousands of tombs, scores of temples, and a multitude of houses, villages, shrines, monasteries, and work stations. This profusely illustrated, oversize book contains more than 800 pictures of this prodigious site. The illustrations include archeological reconstruction drawings and six gatefolds. The text, by 14 leading Egyptologists, offers a concise history of the site. For readers interested in this remarkable civilization, this book is the next best thing to being there. George Cohen
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 6 customer reviews
This is a must own book if you love the tombs.
maiden pa.
It then details the great Temples of the Luxor area useing altitude photos, maps, line drawings, artist drawings floor plans and photos...lots of photos.
alan humphries
It is the next best thing to actually BEING tere and in some cases ..
Alan Day

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 39 people found the following review helpful By alan humphries on November 3, 2001
With out a doubt one of the best and most stuning visual
books I have ever seen about ancient Egypt. Dr Kent Weeks
narative is both interesting and detailed yet should still
appeal to the amateur with an interest in Egypt.
The book details the modern exploration of the valley over the
last few hundred years. It then details the great Temples of
the Luxor area useing altitude photos, maps, line drawings, artist drawings floor plans and photos...lots of photos.
The book then moves into the Valley of the Kings, tomb by
tomb using the same type detailed drawings, photos, plans and
artists renditions.
There is also a detailed section of the Queens Valley using the same techniques as the rest of the book.
But the star of the book is Araldo de Lucas photos. The clearity and detail of the close ups leaps off the pages
and are as near flawless as one can get in colour and content. there are several fold out pages and the detail
is incredable. This book is excellent in every aspect. A must for
anyone interested in Ancient Egyptolgy .
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Katherine Mann on February 6, 2002
I had looked forward with great anticipation to the arrival of this book - and I am not at all disappointed. In the past few years a few books have been published which have delighted my eyes, Tutankhamun, by T.G.H. James, and Egyptian Treasures from the Egyptian Museum in Cairo and now the present work. They share in common the photographer - Araldo De Luca.
De Luca is a consumate artist of light. Throughout this book you will see exquisite shots, described and formed by the light of Egypt - Medinet Habu at dawn, The Temples of Hatshepsut and Mentuhotep, from the air in the dawn light, at the precise moment that the entire Valley of the Kings lies in shadows between golden cliffs behind. There are more - photographs of objects and buildings that I have never seen, or at least not so clearly. De Luca has found the perfect vantage point for every shot, it seems, and has waited for the light to lift the ordinary into statement, explanation rather than simple recording.
Sprinkled through the various essays - and each essay written by a distinguished expert in their field - are delightful drawings, diagrams and maps. We have sumptuous renderings of the interior of Tutankhamon's tomb, which are not so uncommon, but this volume goes on to show us drawings of the interior of Nefertari's tomb, and there's more! The tombs of the Nobles are pictured with the same fine sensitivity as well as the mortuary temples of the west bank.
The essays take a back seat, at first glance, so truly wonderful are the photographs, but here you will find rich descriptions and explanations of the monuments and the objects found within them. Kent Weeks is the general editor; there is an introduction by Her Excellency Mrs. Suzanne Mubarek; Rita Freed, Melinda K. Hartwig, Erik Hornung, Christian Leblanc ...
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Alan Day on April 24, 2003
Having read Kent Week's book "The Lost Tomb" I was impressed with his accessable writing style. So, seeing this book was like waving a red flag at a bull. I have been to many of the sights featured in this book and could not afford to visit all. To my joy, on opening this volume and seeing the quality of the photographs I realised now that I could! It is the next best thing to actually BEING tere and in some cases .. better! I know that sounds odd ... but in reality a lot of the KV paintings are covered with glass to prevent damage ... or you are not allowed to take a camera in ... even if you can, you may not use flash. So your own pictures always fall short. THIS is professionally lit, photographed and documented ... with great care taken to render the Theabian west bank in all it's glory. Bravo!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again