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The Value Profit Chain: Treat Employees Like Customers and Customers Like Employees Hardcover – January 9, 2003


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Free Press; 1St Edition edition (January 9, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743225694
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743225694
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #797,399 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Serving employees well and knowing when to "fire" a customer will boost a firm's bottom line, according to this team of Harvard Business School professors. The authors of The Service Profit Chain here stress the creation of lifetime customers and detail the complex relationship between employee satisfaction, customer retention and profitability. They use examples from firms including Federal Express, Southwest Airlines and Wal-Mart. The highly successful Southwest Airlines, for example, couldn't deliver its much-envied 25-minute aircraft turnaround, from arrival to departure from the gate, without a dedicated, team-oriented staff that's vested in the company. That's why all Southwest employees with more than six months of service hold ownership stakes in the firm. Perhaps more important is how Southwest manages customers that must be "targeted, selected, and `trained' in the unusual ways of the airline-no assigned seats, no meals, no connections with other airlines." By turning high-maintenance customers away, the firm stays profitable. These anecdotes aside, the book is laden with b-school sentences, e.g., "The value concept is achieved with maximum benefit for customers, employees, partners, and investors through an operating strategy that seeks to leverage results over costs by means of such factors as organization, policies, processes, practices, measures, controls, and incentives." With text like this and numerous charts and diagrams, the book will appeal mainly to academics and business professionals. However, there are a few nuggets that will appeal to a broader audience, like the fact that the greeters near the entrance to Wal-Mart stores were originally put there to reduce shoplifting.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

What most topflight leaders know intuitively is now proven through this sequel to The Service Profit Chain (1997)--which is, treating today's employees like customers will produce tomorrow's loyal and committed customers. Calculated through decades of research by eminent Harvard Business School professors, supported by other groundbreaking studies, the authors have now forged a strong link between the performance trinity--leadership and management, culture and values, vision and strategy--and continued success. Many of the usual business-case suspects are profiled, among them Wal-Mart, Southwest Airlines, and Cisco Systems. So are companies that have transformed themselves, such as Coors and IBM. Every possible touchpoint for organizational improvement is probed, examined, and computed, from Omnicom's customer-relationship model to critical matrices of learning and innovation. Much is stated in jargon; it is only when describing organizational excellence, wherever it exists, that the narrative loses its didactic style and becomes almost lyrical--and comprehensible to the average businessperson. Managers' questions at the end of each chapter reinforce the book's educational thrust. Barbara Jacobs
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

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Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By S. Cesare on October 16, 2008
Format: Hardcover
The book is fundamentally equal to the previous book from the same authors titled "Service Profit Chain" (often with the same examples!). New stuff about Strategic management is not incisive as the well defined concepts in Service Profit Chain.

Contents: 3 stars
Typographic expression: 1 star (bad structuring, no cross index to merge different aspects of same topic or different topics related to the same objective)
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Joseph Wheeler on October 31, 2003
Format: Hardcover
The Value Profit Chain provides tremendous insight into the critical elements of a world class operating strategy. I particularly found Chapters 1 and 2 extremely helpful in providing a framework to think about the details of what is required to support our brand positioning. As they say, God is in the details and this book helped me understand which details matter and which don't. I highly recommend this book to anyone trying to lead customer-focused change in their organizations.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Desiree Santana on April 5, 2008
Format: Hardcover
incredibly boring. The book's ideas are great, but the vocabulary and the way they wrote the book puts you to sleep. I bought this book for one of my management classes, and even the teacher agrees that this book in boring. Good ideas, though!
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5 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Dr. David Arelette on May 22, 2003
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book has some value but it is jumbled up with a lot of that mumbo jumbo that people in HR use when they have little to add to a discussion.
Most employees are not owners and will never really behave (work hard) like owners - they talk much about loyalty and responding to good practices but experience tells me that when it comes to the choice of a midnight session to complete a presentation, most will have an excuse (got to take the cat to the vet) and those that stay will want two days off as their matching reward while telling you for the next year how hard they work.
This book sides with the employees as being open to great things so you just have to treat them as per their instructions.
Yes in some cases, employees will meet the expectations. But mostly they will let you down, as does this book.
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