The Very Best Of: Only The Beginning (US Release)

July 2, 2002 | Format: MP3

$18.99
Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
1
4:27
2
4:49
3
3:19
4
6:26
5
5:01
6
5:41
7
3:00
8
2:16
9
3:35
10
3:55
11
5:02
12
3:42
13
4:14
14
4:28
15
4:35
16
4:02
17
3:15
18
3:01
19
3:55
Disc 2
1
3:29
2
3:02
3
2:57
4
4:08
5
3:49
6
3:58
7
5:06
8
3:51
9
4:44
10
3:50
11
3:48
12
4:13
13
3:51
14
4:01
15
4:16
16
3:57
17
3:44
18
4:00
19
4:18
20
3:21


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: July 2, 2002
  • Release Date: July 2, 2002
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Rhino
  • Copyright: 2004 Warner Strategic Marketing
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 2:37:06
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00124BQ6K
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (276 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,554 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Rhino Records does a nice packaging job.
Jason Stein
This is the helluva great album, I recommend it to everyone out there who enjoys music, and of course is a MUST for all Chicago fans!!!!!
Fiona
This is an amazing collection of songs by one of the best bands ever!
Daniel Keeney

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

178 of 182 people found the following review helpful By Steve Vrana HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on July 7, 2002
Format: Audio CD
Don't throw out your copy of the 4-disc Portraits box set just yet. While Rhino does a terrific job of distilling Chicago's career from their 1969 debut (before shortening their name from Chicago Transit Authority) through their final Top 40 hit in 1991 ("Chasin' the Wind"), I do find fault with some of Rhino's decisions.
For starters, only 34 of the band's 35 Top 40 hits are here. Missing is 1975's "Harry Truman," which went to No. 13. Also, unlike 1991's box set, several of these songs are edits. Granted, if you remember these songs from AM radio, you won't notice the difference. These are, after all, the single versions of these songs. So on songs like "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?" the piano introduction has been deleted. "Beginnings" has the percussion at the end edited out. "I'm a Man" does not include the drum and percussion interlude.
Other than that, this is a well chosen and thorough collection. Where the box set only covered the band's history through 1980, Rhino brings the band's history up to date with the inclusion of their thirteen hits from the Eighties and Nineties. The set conlcudes with the Louis Prima standard "Sing, Sing, Sing" which Chicago performed with the Gipsy Kings on their 1995 album Night & Day: Big Band. In addition, the 16-page booklet is informative, if not somewhat brief when you consider the band's 30-plus year history. [Note: When Columbia released the Portraits box set, it included an extensive booklet; the current Chicago Records version now in print contains no booklet at all.]
At any rate, this anthology will make redundant the three current greatest hits collections. If you're a fan of the hybrid music Chicago helped create by adding a full-time horn section to a rock band and you're still listening to your worn out vinyl records, this collection is a no-brainer. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
133 of 146 people found the following review helpful By G. J Wiener on December 27, 2002
Format: Audio CD
What a difference between two CD's. Well I guess that is what you get with a band that has evolved as much as Chicago.
The first CD is nearly flawless. All of it was recorded when Terry Kath was alive and the band recorded rock, blues, and a few ballads augmented by stunning horn arrangements. Terry Kath's guitar solos are oh so creative. Just listen to the wah wah infected solos on I'm A Man and Lowdown and the lightning fast soloing on 25 or 6 to 4 and Make Me Smile. The tone is oh so cool by Mr. Kath on Feelin' Stronger Everyday as well as the Peter Cetera sung Questions 67 and 68.
Robert Lamm's contributions on Saturday In The Park and Does Anyone Really Know What Time It Is are strong. Catchy tunes with good singing. Peter Cetera adds some nice songs as well. In moderation, Peter is just fine, tenor voice and all. Overall, this first CD is an easy five stars in spite of a few questionable edits.
The second CD is a horse of a diferent color. It starts off nicely with Old Days. Then we have Baby What A Big Surprise. Not Chicago's worst song, but certainly a sign of an unfortunate power struggle shift to Peter Cetera's sappy ballads. I actually like Take Me Back To Chicago as Robert Lamm's vocals are on the money and guest star Chaka Kahn contributes nicely as well. Afterwards its kind of hit and miss with the sappy Peter Cetera ballads. Some are more tolerable than others.
When Peter left, Chicago deteriorated even further with synthesizers dominating the scene and terribly uninspired vocals as well as horrible drumming(Why in the world did they can Danny Seraphine?). Also, whatever happened to the horn arrangements? Where is keyboardist Robert Lamm for that matter? They were the backbone of this fine band. Is this even Chicago or an imposter band?
Read more ›
10 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
39 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Jason Stein VINE VOICE on July 8, 2002
Format: Audio CD
Once again, I must give my explanation of compilation packages. They are not designed for fans who have all the cds from the artist. A good package will include all the artist's top 40 hits plus key album cuts. "The Very Best Of: Only The Beginning" gets a high mark for including all of Chicago's top 40 hits with the exception of "Harry Truman". The five non-hits, though not what Chicago enthusiasts would select, are fine additions to this compilation. All tracks are digitally remastered, which is a plus on the 1969-1980 material, and a nice enhancement of the 1982-1991 material. I particularly liked Chicago's version of The Spencer Davis Group's "I'm A Man". For anyone who grew up in the 1970's, or like myself, the 1980's, this compilation is filled with memories. Unfortunately, as is documented here, Chicago became a slickly produced ballad factory beginning with "Chicago 16", but not glaringly apparent until "Chicago 18". At any rate, the power ballad never sounded so good. I think only Toto could rival Chicago for power ballad excellence (they need a two disc compilation!) This is a great way to introduce kids to a great band, or a great way to condense a collection on to cd, digitally remastered. Listening to this compilation just reminds me of the pitiful state of top 40 radio today. I can only think of the band Cake, offhand, that uses brass in their music currently. Rhino Records does a nice packaging job. I liked how they displayed all the album covers under the cd tray, and how they give track information in the cd jacket. The liner notes were nothing special, just brief career overview. All in all, the best two disc Chicago compilation under one roof thus far.
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for Similar Items by Category