The Very Best Of Cream

May 9, 1995 | Format: MP3

$11.49
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
2:21
2
2:51
3
2:43
4
3:17
5
3:58
6
6:30
7
2:46
8
4:10
9
2:46
10
2:31
11
3:27
12
4:58
13
4:58
14
4:11
15
2:53
16
3:09
17
3:38
18
4:15
19
2:38
20
2:44


Product Details

  • Label: Polydor
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:10:44
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001NCL382
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (132 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,422 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

This is arguably the best greatest hits album ever compiled.
Lawrence Pass
After hearing this, you will want to buy all the Cream you can find.
J. Humphreville
It's good that the CD's of innovators like Cream are still around.
"starguitar"

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

91 of 94 people found the following review helpful By Bogar on December 2, 1999
Format: Audio CD
Here is the finest of Cream - the 60s' mythical trio which gave rock a new definition and took blues as far as it has ever been taken. Eric Clapton's virtuoso guitar, Jack Bruce's mesmerising musicianship, Ginger Baker's guru drumming - it's all in this album, all at its best! Included are epic tracks like "Sunshine of Your Love", "I Feel Free", "Spoonful", "Strange Brew", "White Room", "Badge"... a non-stop succession of the cream of Cream, the 19 best studio recordings, topped up by the legendary live rendition of "Crossroads". It is remarkable that, untypically, the producers have made an honest effort to include all the best songs in the compilation, not leaving ground for "The Vey Best, part 2". The only problem with this release is it's so good (and that includes, at least to my ears, the sound quality) it will instantly make you want to buy all of the original albums - and that might as well be a wise decision. However, if you're quite sure you only want one CD by Cream, then, undoubtedly, this is it!
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By nicjaytee on December 26, 1999
Format: Audio CD
How good were they?... I saw them play at a well known blues club - the Ricky Tick in Windsor (England) - several times in summer 1966. R&B was the scene at the time. A local UK group - Geno Washington & The Ram Jam Band - covered US R&B and Soul numbers and were considered the business. Cream arrived and played music that few had heard before. In the middle of one number (NSU?) the crowd got agitated and started chanting Geno... Geno... Eric Clapton turned to Jack Bruce and said something along the lines of "they're booing". They then launched into the loudest, longest and most complicated guitar solo the small crowd had ever heard. The result... stunned silence for the rest of their set and several dozen instant Cream fans.
A great, innovative group.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Daniel J. Hamlow HALL OF FAME on February 23, 2006
Format: Audio CD
The history of electric blues would not be complete with mention of Eric Clapton, especially during his stint with Cream, which was in the vanguard of the British blues revival of the 1960's. Indeed, Cream, which also included drummer Ginger Baker and bassist/pianist/guitarist Jack Bruce, covered 30's blues legend Skip James' "I'm So Glad." The bulk of material on this very best of collection is taken from their two best albums, Disraeli Gears and Wheels of Fire, but there are some songs from Fresh Cream and Goodbye. And it's Clapton's guitar, sizzling and hard-edged one moment, wailing and bluesy the next, that really gave him and Cream their name.

The Stones and Led Zeppelin weren't alone in covering Willie Dixon. Cream covered "Spoonful" with a tempo and mood, and harmonica that owes a nod to traditional blues. Their live version of Robert Johnson's "Crossroads" was their last Top 40 hit, peaking at #28 in 1969. And another cover is Albert King's "Born Under a Bad Sign" with such pain-striking imagery: "been down since I began to crawl/if it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all." I felt that way years ago.

What two songs are best associated with Cream? A no-brainer there. There's "Sunshine of Your Love," which hit #5, and the #6 "White Room," the former from Disraeli Gears and the latter from Wheels of Fire. The former scores with that familiar crunchy bluesy electric guitar that makes it a classical rock radio staple. "White Room" is one of those image-evoking songs that made Cream what it was, from the "White room with black curtains" to "silver horses run down moonbeams." This and other image songs were highlights of the psychedelic era.

But there are other famous tunes.
Read more ›
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68 of 87 people found the following review helpful By J. Humphreville on February 24, 2000
Format: Audio CD
I am 19 years old and therefore can not say I ever saw Cream Live on stage in person. However, I can say that this band, and I speak as a musician and a classic rock dj, is the most talented rock band ever who are only challenged by that of Rush. Eric Clapton, who I feel did nothing noteworthy after 1971 shines in this band. Jack Bruce, the bassist, is underrated. He sang and wrote most of the songs. Ginger Baker. Have you ever seen a crazier drummer. He took double bass rock drumming to where it is today. Now personally, I say that every Cream song is great and should be heard. Hwever, those who have only heard the legend and are curious should pick this cd up. It has all the best. "I Feel Free", which is currently a car commercial, is a great tune. It seems simple but there is far more than meets the eye. "N.S.U." speaks for so many people with just one line: "The only time I'm happy's when I play my guitar." How about the classic tunes from the Disraeli Gears album. "Strange Brew" is an interesting venture into a new realm for the band. And are any other ten bass hits(7 notes) in music more memorable than the intro to "Sunshine Of Your Love". The dueling vocals on this tune and Baker's odd drumming make this track still amazing to this day. "Tales Of Brave Ulysses" has become a recent favorite of mine. The lyrics and the melody(which will appear later in the album as well) just work too well together. "White Room" What many consider to be Cream's masterpiece. I love the intro. Bruce's voice never sounds as good. The melody from "...Ulysses" comes back for this tune. A true CLASSIC. I love "Crossroads". It is a great tune with a great repeating riff.Read more ›
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