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The Violence of Love Paperback


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The Violence of Love + A Theology of Liberation: History, Politics, and Salvation (15th Anniversary Edition with New Introduction by Author) + In the Company of the Poor: Conversations with Dr. Paul Farmer and Fr. Gustavo Gutierrez
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 214 pages
  • Publisher: Orbis Books (February 10, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1570755353
  • ISBN-13: 978-1570755354
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #262,668 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Oscar Romero was converted by suffering: the suffering of a friend, of the people he served, and then finally his own suffering. There are many ways to be converted, but perhaps the best way is to live among the poor and to discover in them as Romero did, the presence of Christ. -- Samuel Ruiz Garcia, Bishop of San Cristobal, Chiapas Mexico

Romero does not speak from a distance. He does not hide his fears, his brokenness, his hesitations. It is as if he puts his arm around my shoulder and slowly walks with me. He shares my struggles. There is a warmth in his words that opens my heart to listen. -- Henri J. M. Nouwen, from the Forward

These homilies reveal lines of poetic beauty describing a cruel and ugly world Here is indomitable courage and utter humility. Here is a message of hope. --Robert McAfee Brown, Professor Emeritus, Pacific School of Religion

Language Notes

Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Spanish --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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One cannot help soul searching after the experience.
"hopefulchristian"
I would recommend this book to anyone seeking direction in life or anyone seeking the inspiration of a hero for humanity.
Heather L. Mikus
That any Christian suffering must pray for and love their enemies.
Lisa

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

60 of 61 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on April 30, 2000
Format: Paperback
Archbishop Romero, the asassinated bishop of El Salvador (1980) is considered by me and many to be a prophet to the church and world of our time. Faced with a situation in his country that saw 5 percent of his nation with 95 percent of the wealth and total power over the government and military which they used to oppress the 95 percent in poverty, Archbishop Romero was transformed from a conservative bookworm to the greatest orator for justice in the clergy since Martin Luther King, Jr. This book contains excerpts from his sermons arragned in chronological order during the three years of his episcopacy in San Salvador (1977-1980). These sermons were more than just spiritual messages, but rather nation-wide calls for social justice, for nonviolence, and for an end to poverty and pain. Drawing on readings from the bible, Romero the scholar and orator shine through, but so does the Romero of compassion and solidarity with the people who suffered so much. And in many ways what he said then is still applicable today, not only in El Salvador, but all over the world, wherever there is injustice and oppression. A must read for any person concerned for social justice for all grounded in a Christian perspective!
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27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Lisa on December 25, 2004
Format: Paperback
I bought this book after seeing the DVD "Romero". There are very few things in my life which I can say changed everything for me, and the DVD and this book were some of those few. He speaks simply and clearly to a loved audience of suffering believers. He speaks to the need of a conversion of love for the poor as an imperative step after a conversion to Christ. That every Christian living in comfort and safety must give money, time, energy, and prayer to the needs of the poor and oppressed. And that this giving must be past the point of what is convenient. He says that no Christian has a right to live in comfort if he sees someone suffering. That any Christian suffering must pray for and love their enemies. This book is radical in its simplicity, in its clarity, in its gentleness, and in its absolute conviction. Tragically, Romero was killed in 1980 for trying to live out the commands of Christ.

This book is great as a devotional, even if you are not into devotionals, and can be read in small bites.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 24, 1999
Format: Paperback
Archbishop Romero's life and writing is a testamony of transending the status quo to becomimng a voice for the voiceless. A bullet from the oppressors silenced this challenge represented by Romero. These writings uncover the presence of Christ amoung the poor. Here is a message of courage and hope revealed in poetic lines rooted in the commom struggle for freedom and justice by the people.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By "hopefulchristian" on August 28, 2001
Format: Paperback
A wonderful book for discovering the true meaning of Christian love in our often difficult and painful world. I have used this book more than once in putting together mini retreats for adults. One cannot help soul searching after the experience. Viewing the film Romero with Raul Julia helps bring it all home. Don't let the title put you off - the book is all about love without violence.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By "joemck" on March 17, 2000
Format: Paperback
Romero's moving quotations, spoken from the altar, are presented in chronological order. Each day Romero spoke increasingly explicit "truth to power". As his message becomes more threatening to the powers that be, the reader can almost watch the gun sites come into focus on the heart of this martyr!
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Preston C. Enright on April 29, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I attended the protest of the School of the Americas at Fort Benning this past November. It was a moving experience, and many times Oscar Romero's name was mentioned. During one gathering, it was announced that some Colombian trade unionists had been murdered by the paramilitaries. The scale of the US-backed violence in Latin America is astonishing; but the struggle against it is inspiring.

Romero would be thrilled to see how Latin American immigrants to the US have been making history with massive rallies to recognize their rights as children of God. In the memory of Romero, and to honor the Latin Americans who are teaching US citizens about democracy and faith, I'd like to share this passage from "The Violence of Love":

"With Christ, God has injected himself into history. With the birth of Christ, God's reign is now inaugurated in human time.

On this night (December 25, 1977), as every year for twenty centuries, we recall that God's reign is now in this world and that Christ has inaugurated the fullness of time. His birth attests that God is now marching with us in history, that we do not go alone.

Humans long for peace, for justice, for a reign of divine law, for something holy, for what is far from earth's reality. We can have such a hope, not because we ourselves are able to construct the realm of happiness that God's holy words proclaim, but because the builder of a reign of justice, of love, and of peace is already in the midst of us."
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Starrider7777 on September 1, 2007
Format: Paperback
Oscar Romero was the archbishop of San Salvador, assassinated while saying Mass in 1980 by death squads, tacitly backed by the United Sates under the Reagan administration. These ideological political forces that executed him were challenged by his public voice against poverty, social injustice, political killings, and torture in El Salvador. Romero was an incredibly eloquent speaker and writer. Here is an excerpt from one of his sermons that appears in "The Violence of Love":

"There is no dichotomy between man and God's image.
Whoever tortures a human being,
whoever abuses a human being,
whoever outrages a human being,
abuses God's image."

Here is another excerpt:

"A preaching that does not point out sin is not the preaching of the gospel A preaching that makes sinners feel good, so that they are secured in their sinful state, betrays the gospel's call. A preaching that does not discomfit sinners but lulls them in their sin leaves Zebulun and Naphtali in the shadow of death.

A preaching that awakens, a preaching that enlightens as when a light turned on awakens and, of course, annoys, the sleeper that is the preaching of Christ, calling "Wake up... Be converted!..." Naturally, such preaching must meet conflict, must spoil what is called prestige, must disturb, must be persecuted. It cannot get along with the powers of darkness and sin..."

Oscar Romero, martyr, spoke the words in this second excerpt Jan. 22, 1978 - roughly 2 months before his assassination.

It is probably worth noting that I am not a Catholic. However, I do consider Oscar Romero to have been a brother in Christ and a fine example for religious people everyewhere.
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