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The Virgin Suicides 2000 R CC

(407) IMDb 7.2/10
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In 1974 Michigan, the lives of a group of teenage boys are affected by the suicide of five daughters of the Lisbon family, whom they worship.

Starring:
James Woods, Kathleen Turner
Runtime:
1 hour, 37 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Romance
Director Sofia Coppola
Starring James Woods, Kathleen Turner
Supporting actors Kirsten Dunst, Josh Hartnett, Michael Paré, Scott Glenn, Danny DeVito, A.J. Cook, Hanna Hall, Leslie Hayman, Chelse Swain, Anthony DeSimone, Lee Kagan, Robert Schwartzman, Noah Shebib, Jonathan Tucker, Joe Roncetti, Hayden Christensen, Chris Hale, Joe Dinicol
Studio Paramount
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

190 of 218 people found the following review helpful By Benjamin J Burgraff VINE VOICE on December 7, 2000
Format: DVD
'The Virgin Suicides' is a beautiful, understated, and tragic drama, punctuated by great rock music of the late '70s, and featuring terrific performances, particularly by Kirsten Dunst, Josh Hartlett, and a nearly unrecognizable Kathleen Turner. What makes the film even more remarkable is that it is the directorial debut by Francis Ford Coppola's daughter, Sofia, best known prior to this by her less-than-stellar performance in 'Godfather 3'! Her sensitivity with this material establishes her as a director to be reckoned with, and a true talent!
The film focuses on the five Lisbon sisters, beautiful, yet repressed by a religious and overly protective mother (Turner), who encourages their intellectual growth, but tries to block any sexual or emotional stirrings. The girls turn their passions into other channels, bonding tightly with one another, and viewing the world as outsiders. When the youngest attempts, then succeeds at killing herself, the family gains an unwanted notoriety, and a group of local boys begin to worship the remaining sisters from afar, gathering materials, and creating a fantasy world about them.
Lux, the most beautiful and free-spirited of the sisters (Dunst), attracts the attentions of the most popular boy in school, Tripp (Hartnett), who confuses raging hormones with love, and begins a campaign to 'have' her. Winning the respect of their father (James Woods, in another excellent 'against-type' portrayal), he succeeds in wearing the mother down, and arranges 'dates' for the sisters, so he can take Lux to the Homecoming Dance. The party provides the springboard for the tragedy that gives the film its name, and catapults the girls into icons that the boys who admire them can never forget.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By ClosedBook on December 24, 2000
Format: DVD
I have to disagree with "flickjunkie". I thought this movie was really good. The acting was wonderful throughout and the scenes were gorgeous.
The suicides were a by product. The movie is about growing up, first loves, obsession and oppression. The statement that suicides are predictable and obvious, thus preventable is ridiculous. That's the point.
But, back to my original statement. The Book! I was fortunate enough to have read the book before seeing the movie. The book gives insight that the movie does not. Characters and motivation are more spelled out for those who need it. Read the book and then watch or rewatch the movie. Things will be more clear, background wise and your movie experience will be more enjoyable.
But for all intents and purposes this is an excellent movie. It boasts an amazing cast and is moving and haunting.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By crazyforgems on September 3, 2003
Format: VHS Tape
"The Virgin Suicides" is a powerful and finely nuanced movie. The plot centers on five beautiful blonde sisters, "The Lisbon Sisters," who live with their overly protective parents in an upscale suburb of Detroit. The narrative is told from the vantage point of an awkward teenage male, now grown up, who lived near them. He and his friends were mesmerized by them and years later still talk about them and sift through their memorabilia of them.
The movie begins with the first two suicide attempts of the youngest sister Cecilia, with the second one being successful. It then traces the impact of her death on her family and her neighbors-with the parents becoming even more protective of their four surviving daughters. Trouble though, comes from Luz, now the youngest and the most vibrant and flirtatious. She falls for the school hunk-and he for her-and with her sisters and their escorts goes to the homecoming dance. This proves to be fatal for all involved.
Sofia Coppola did an amazing job with this movie for a first time director. She focuses on small details-for example, the bracelets that cover the scarred wrists of Cecilia after her first suicide attempt-that tell so much. She pulled an outstanding performance out of Kirsten Dunst who played Luz. She also compiled an amazing soundtrack and score.
I would recommend this movie for those who enjoy "arty" serious films, 70's films, and women-themed movies.It is definitely not a "feel good" movie-but it will stay with you far longer than most other films.
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25 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Miguel on January 1, 2001
Format: DVD
'The Virgin Suicides' is one of the most beautiful and underrated films of the past year.
It is most of all a tragic drama, punctuated by a great soundtrack and a just-right reproduction from the mid '70s, and featuring outstanding performances by its mainly young and then-little-known cast, filled with fresh faces. These come from Kirsten Dunst (as doomed and lovely Lux Lisbon), estremely good James Woods, and in a look-again performance, an unbelievably deglamorized Kathleen Turner. Oters that deserve mention are Noah Shebib (as Parkie Denton), Hayden Chritensen (whom will soon be seen in Episode II) and Hanna Hall as Cecilia Lisbon, the opener of the way.
Another remarkable aspect of the film is that it is the directorial debut by Sofia Coppola, reviled by many for her less-than-stellar performance in Godfather III. It is amazing the rapport of sensitivity with this material established by her as a director with many ideas and visions.
Like its source, the acclaimed novel by Jeffrey Eugenides, the story focuses on the lives and eventual deaths of the legendary five Lisbon sisters (Mary, Therese, Bonaventure -- aka "Bonnie"- Cecilia and Lux) growing up in an elegant, tree-lined upper-class suburban enclave near Detroit, circa 1975. They are fabulously beautiful, yet oddly repressed by their well-meaning but stifling parents.
In more ways than one, the Lisbon girls become a some sort of single entity, and with the spectacular suicide of the youngest sibling, they take a step in a strange direction that will transform them into history for a group of boys in the neighborhood, who, in their adult years, keep their obsession alive.
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