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The Voice that Remembers: A Tibetan Woman's Inspiring Story of Survival Paperback – April 1, 1999


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Wisdom Publications; 2nd edition (April 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0861711491
  • ISBN-13: 978-0861711499
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 5.8 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #842,333 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"With so much of Tibetan history recently lost, this book's achievement is to capture the details of Tibet's agony in a remote corner of our land. I was also born in that remote corner, and Ama Adhe brings to life the spirit there that China tried to wipe out." (Lodi Gyari, President, International Campaign for Tibet)

"A riveting account of the desecration of a culture, a religion, a family and a landscape." (Mickey Spiegel, Human Rights Watch)

"A moving testimony which serves to further international awareness and understanding. This book must be read." (Amnesty International)

"Ama Adhe's moving account of the Chinese invasion of Tibet and her 27-year imprisonment is both deeply disturbing and inspiring. In striking contrast to her horrific experiences as a prisoner, the tone of her narrative is calm and matter-of-fact. As the title suggests, this book is not only about Adhe but also about remembering those who did not survive... Her story is also the story of Tibet as a country and the desperate struggle to save its culture and religion from destruction." (Manoa: Song of the Snow Lion)

"Highly recommended reading... the 'stories of imprisonment,' apart from their important function of exposing the cruelties the Chinese inflicted (and are still inflicting) on the Tibetan populace, can also provide us with a source of tremendous inspiration: the strength of the human spirit demonstrated by Ama Adhe in her account is truly admirable and can act as a model of determination and courage for others." (Tibet Journal)

"The story of a woman who sustained her human dignity, integrity, and compassion in the face of immense degradation and suffering... both compelling and inspiring." (Feminist Bookstore News)

"I have never read a book as terrifying and inspiring in my life. A Tibetan woman's account of twenty-seven years of torture in labor camps for resisting China's occupation of her homeland. Ama Adhe describes--with unutterable calm--acts of unthinkable evil, and the unwavering spirit of the woman who withstood them." (Psychology Today)

"A captivating story and testimony to the powers of the human will." (Virginia Quarterly Review)

"A searing tale." (Booklist)

"Adhe's early autobiographical accounts of being raised in the Tibetan culture are most rare and precious, but history forces her account to turn to documentation of the first wave of Communist troops in 1950. Though not graphic in its detail, the sheer weight of her list of atrocities is deeply moving. Ama Adhe has provided a sound foundation for the building of truth." (Parabola Magazine)

About the Author

Ama Adhe Tapontsang is a native of the Kham region of eastern Tibet, where she spent a happy childhood, and is an activist dedicated to securing the much-needed freedom of her country. Imprisoned for twenty-seven years for her resistance activities following the invasion of her country by the Chinese Communists in the 1950s, she faced inhuman torture and deprivation. Following her release, she left in 1987 for India, where she now lives in Dharamsala. The Voice That Remembers is the story of her life.

Joy Blakeslee, M.A. Ed, J.D., is a writer and teacher who specializes in human rights, history, and literacy. Blakeslee has worked in civil rights law, as a teacher for the New York Department of Education, and as an independent researcher. She has visited India many times, and is profoundly impressed by the strength, determination, and spirituality of the Tibetan people. She is currently co-writing a book with Dr. Gloria Frelix about post-Civil Rights era Mississippi, and corporate, environmental racism. Blakeslee lives in Florida.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 11, 1999
Format: Hardcover
My heart and respect goes out to this woman who, still living today, survived the atrocities the chinese revolutionaries inflicted on her. I applaud her determination not to be "reeducated" by the communists throughout her entire imprisonment and her success in not allowing this to happen. I also applaud her perserverance in maintaining her faith, when it would be so easy to abandone this in such circumstances. Noone should have to withstand the brutal, inhumane kinds of behavior she did. Throughout the book and even afterwards, I still ask myself the same question "how could anyone do such things to another human being?". Was truly affected by the story and am much more aware of the Tibetan struggle as a result. Highly recommend this for a week-end read!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Stephen on July 9, 2001
Format: Paperback
I have read a number of books on Tibet, but this was the first from a womans point of view. To learn not only about women in Tibet but women in general was very educational. Being one of very very few to survive her prison ordeal Ama has taken the task of sharing the story of many of her dead friends. The attrocities have been played down to some extent, compared to other books I have read. Good for the sensative but curriouse reader. Worth while.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Stirling Davenport on November 17, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This is one of my favorite books of all time--among thousands of books I've read. Writing with great honesty and humility, Ama Adhe's courage and compassion shine like a lamp for anyone faced with oppression, torture and brutality for their beliefs and devotion to their homeland and people. My heart goes out to her with great gratitude for sharing her story with the world. I hope others will read it and treasure the example of her spirit. I think her book made me a better person.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Ben Oboe on December 27, 2003
Format: Paperback
This is a very powerful and moving account of one woman's life of incredible hardship and suffering, a personal view of the systematic destrucion of Tibet. Ama-la lost her family, her friends, her country. But, despite experiencing the horrors of the Tibetan holocaust, she held on to her identity, her dignity, and her compassion.
Ama-la's sincere good-heartedness, rooted in the heart of Tibetan culture, triumphs in the end over the inhumanity unleashed by Mao's China. Prison, privation, and state-sponsored brutality fail to undermine this amazing woman's sense of what it means to be a decent human being. Here is a role model for everyone, everywhere.
The basic goodness of this remarkable woman is conveyed perfectly in this simple, honest narrative. This is a story that one finds difficult to turn away from. Ama Adhe is a person the reader will care about deeply after reading this book.
Ama-la survived to remind us that more than a million Tibetans did not. I hope that readers will be inspired to look learn more about this monumental tragedy, one which continues to this day.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Ben Oboe on August 18, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This is a very powerful and moving account of one woman's life of incredible hardship and suffering. Ama-la lost her family, her friends, and her country... but she kept her identity, her dignity, or her compassion. What makes this story so inspiring is that Ama-la's sincere good-heartedness triumphs, against appalling odds, over the systemic evil that the People's Republic of China unleashed on her and on her Tibetan homeland. Prison, privation, brutality, and hate fail utterly to undermine this amazing woman's sense of what it means to be a decent human being. Here is a role model for everyone, everywhere.
The basic goodness of this remarkable woman is conveyed perfectly in this simple, honest narrative. This is a story that one finds difficult to turn away from. Ama Adhe is a person the reader will care about deeply after reading this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 27, 1998
Format: Hardcover
...how people can be so inhumane, robotic, and repugnant.
Ama Adhe's account of her 27 (!) years in labor camps will chill you, inspire you, and make you appreciate how good your life really is. The free Tibet movement has taken on an entirely new, deeper meaning as a result of reading this book. I wasn't able to put the book down all night, and I won't put it out of my mind for a long while to come.
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