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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Powerful Story
The Waiting Child is a wonderful book that anyone who has adopted from China or is in the process of adopting an older child must read. It chronicles the relentless campaign that Jaclyn, adopted at the age of four, launches to bring home her baby, a little boy that she took care of in her social welfare institute. As an adoptive mother with a daughter from China, I...
Published on February 26, 2003 by varichard

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15 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, but a bit preachy
I was drawn to this story because I adopted from China. All through the read, which was a quick one, I wished to author had relayed more of her duaghter's story. I grew tired of the hearing over and over the requests for Xiao Mei Mei and the alluded to only recollections of life in the orphanage. The author states in the beginning how amazed she was that her daughter...
Published on October 15, 2003 by Susan


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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Powerful Story, February 26, 2003
By 
"varichard" (Baltimore, MD United States) - See all my reviews
The Waiting Child is a wonderful book that anyone who has adopted from China or is in the process of adopting an older child must read. It chronicles the relentless campaign that Jaclyn, adopted at the age of four, launches to bring home her baby, a little boy that she took care of in her social welfare institute. As an adoptive mother with a daughter from China, I found this book to be very powerful. It helped put into prospective the experience that some of China's parentless children have while they are waiting for their forever families. The book includes a lot of information about life in an orphanage, as Jaclyn was old enough to share her memories. In addition, I was deeply moved by how resilient Jaclyn was even though she had experienced a lot of trauma and change in her short lives. While Jaclyn's story has a lot of sorrow, it is a story of great triumph, despite the fact that Jaclyn had experienced serves loss, neglect, and upheaval she prevails. The author, Cindy Champnella, is very candid and honest about some of the challenges that are involved in adopting an older child. She share how Jaclyn felt about being adopted by an American couple, and Cindy's own reservations of adopting a child who would be removed from her culture and language. Jaclyn, like so many children adopted from China, is a survivor who loves life. The Waiting Child is a powerful story.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars story of the human spirit, March 6, 2003
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I almost don't want to write a review of The Waiting Child because I feel like I could never do the book justice. But I am writing this because I want you to read it. Simply put, this book is a story of the human spirit. In a time where we are constantly reminded of the hatred in this world, we need to hear more about people, especially children, who are motivated by love. Unbelievably, Jaclyn never gave up. Even in the face of almost impossible odds. If you have ever doubted the viability of love changing this world, you will be awed by Jaclyn.
Besides the theme of love and hope, the story of adoption is tremendous. I felt like this was an honest, powerful look at how tough but ultimately, how rewarding, adoption is for a parent and the family. The emotion is openly laid out on the page and you will not be able to forget it.
Having been to China, I can vouch for the accuracy of the description of the country. Although beautiful, many facilities are in bad repair.
Definitely a top ten book on my list.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The story of many older girls adopted from China, February 28, 2003
This is a story that has much in common with many older girls' tales who were adopted from China. I read this book straight through to the end. It absolutely corraborates what my daughter, adopted from China at 5, has told us. I found it to be very straight forward and unsoppy considering the content although my husband couldn't help shedding a few tears for Jaclyn's baby. My next move was to order extra copies for friends and relatives. Proceeds from the purchase of this book go to Half the Sky Foundation, an organization that gives aid to orphanages in China. I highly reccommend this true story. It even has a happy ending!
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A lesson in Faith, February 25, 2003
This heartwarming story provides the reader with inspiration and hope. I laughed, cried, and rejoiced at the stamina of one little girl who wouldn't forget her "baby". If you didn't believe in miracles before, you certainly will after reading about Jaclyn's faith that miracles CAN really happen. I closed the book and offered a prayer of thanks - once again, for the joy and unconditional love that children bring to this world. It's a must read for anyone indecisive about adoption.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Waiting Child: How the Faith and Love of One Orphan SavL, April 3, 2003
By A Customer
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Cindy Champnella writes on her dedication page, "For Jaclyn....my light, my love, my sorrow, my joy....my child." Thus begins the most beautiful story you will ever read. It's the story of 4 year old Jaclyn, adopted from a Chinese orphanage, and her never-ending determination and yearning to bring home the 2 year old boy she loved and "mothered" there. I have known Cindy for a number of years now, and have known the story of Jaclyn and Lee. Yet reading this incredible story in its entirity was so moving I couldn't put it down. Being an adoptive Mom myself, I was very glad to read Cindy's truthful tale of adoption...tremendous joys coupled with moments of raw grief. This is a must-read for anyone who loves children, and is willing to be inspired by the love of a 4 year old, and inspired by her parents who dared to believe that dreams really can come true.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highly recommended to anyone!, May 13, 2004
By A Customer
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Easily one of the most touching and inspiring stories I've ever read. As an adoptive parent myself and soon to begin the process again, I cried through every chapter and could not put the book down.
I feel compelled to answer some of the criticisms I've read. First of all, this IS beautifully written. Though a self-acknowleged first-time writer, the author writes in a style that is refreshing and unpretentious, perfectly suited to the purpose. This is a real-life account which does not need elaborate plot and character development. Yes, I would have liked more details in certain places but have to respect the privacy of the family and those who worked to bend the rules and work around the system.
Secondly, the charge that the author is racist and somehow planted anti-China sentiments is absurd. She has Chinese daughters, a neice, and nephews whom she obviously loves dearly. She acknowledges up front that she views China with American eyes yet is clear that she has come to love China and tries to instill appreciation for it in her children. Most parents who adopt internationally realize how important this is for their childrens' self-esteem. Jaclyn's negative feelings toward China have much less to do with a lack of national and cultural pride than they do with personal loss and the harshness of orphanage life. It is only after she has begun to heal, that Jaclyn begins to recall simple pleasures and the kindness of those that looked after her there.
Thirdly, the author is NOT trying to toot her own horn either by adopting these wonderful kids or by telling this story. She is simply commending those who choose not to look the other way from children who wait. Within the adoption community, there is a bias from the "politically correct" against those who would seek to "save a child" as if the desire to parent and the needs of those children were somehow mutually exclusive. (Although it is theoretically possible that one might treat adoptees as inferior to bio children, I've very rarely seen it happen). No matter how good the orphanage, children belong with a loving family, whether in China or abroad. No, they are not "lucky" for having been separated from their birth families, their culture, and their heritage-this is tragic. Are they fortunate to be adopted when only 4% (officially, actual number is most likely much smaller)of those abandoned ever will be? And (although not in the best interest of intercountry relations to boast) to a country where they will not only have material advantages and educational opportunity but MUCH more importantly, personal and religious freedoms which many have and continue to die to obtain and protect?
This is an important read. It inspires hope for anyone in any circumstance and calls us to examine our priorities. But specifically, it calls attention to the needs of children everywhere. If it has inspired just one person or couple to form or enlarge a family through adoption - and adoption is NOT second-best- it has been successful. Add to that , all of the author's proceeds are going to benefit the children who remain in Chinese orphanages. Let's stop the petty bickering and criticism and concentrate on the children. Thank you Cindy and Jaclyn!
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Life Changing Book, April 9, 2003
By 
Carrie (Massachusetts) - See all my reviews
Never did I imagine when I picked up this book that my life would be changed. I cried and cried for Jaclyn's struggle and for children everywhere waiting for parents in orphanages. The images of children waiting for parents have haunted me since reading Jaclyn's story. I was absolutely fascinated by the adoption process and the Champnella's willingness to expand their family despite their own financial challenges. This book was so honest and compelling...adoption had never been so real or made as much sense as this book did. After reading it, I was moved to sponsor a child in the orphanage through the Half the Sky Foundation. In addition, I have opened myself up to the possibility of adopting a little girl from China. I know that if our infertility treatments fail in our attempts to have a sibling for our daughter that I will be OK. This story has comforted me, and a door has opened in the most inviting way. I know that there is a beautiful alternative (which we may even pursue if we do have another biological child). I am very grateful to Cindy Champnella for sharing her family's amazing story.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Don't read this book if you are hard-hearted, February 28, 2003
By A Customer
International adoption has taken off, but older children aren't generally a part of the ever-increasing number of kids joining families in the USA. This book will give you reason to pause and think about the possiblity of adding an older child to your family. Cindy tells the truth about the pluses and minuses of this kind of family-building. She shares a special loving insight into the mind of a post-institutionalized child who has the heart to worry about the fate of "her baby" in China. I shared this journey vicariously with her as she posted to our "list" about her kids,... She hasn't disappointed me with her book. I am blown away by it, and only wish I were the kind of mom that she is.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great book!, September 30, 2004
By 
I read the book " The Waiting Child" from cover to cover. I was so fascinated by the story that I didn't want to put it down until late into the night. I was so touched by Jaclyn and her love for " her baby" Lee that I couldn't hold back my tears many times. This is a happy ending story.

Having lived in both China and USA, I can tell all the description of the adoption process in China is very true and vivid, such as the life of the children in the orphanage, Chinese officials and Cindy's trip back to America. The challenges Cindy had to face in everyday life after the adoption were also written very truthfully.

As a mother and a grandmother, I think the book should be read not only by the people who adopted children or will adopt children, but also by anyone who loves family. I even recommend it to young readers because it will touch the spirit of their hearts and make them understand better the profound love given by their parents.

Thank you Cindy for telling us the unforgettable story. Thank your sister and your brother-in-law for adopting Lee. Thank you Jaclyn for finding parents for Lee. You are all heroes.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Little girl, Big heart, March 5, 2003
What an incredible true story about such a little girl and her love for a little boy. This story is more than an adoption story, it is a story about love and faith (a modern day fairy tale). With this book, you need a box of kleenex at your side and a free day, because you don't want to put the book down. After reading this, it made me reflect on the most important thing in my world of modern materialism -- Family!
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