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305 of 332 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Zombie Epic Takes a Double Dip--Great For Newbies, But Probably An Essential Upgrade Only For Fervent Fans
NOTE: Some are claiming that the 3-disc edition is edited. IT IS ABSOLUTELY NOT EDITED. There are no missing scenes. There is an international version available that is somewhat less than complete (edited for gore), so beware of third party sellers. It appears that some U.S. copies may have a playback quirk, though (mine doesn't). On the episode "Guts," if you Play...
Published on August 2, 2011 by K. Harris

versus
224 of 296 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Why is 3-Disc Special Edition edited ???
First off let me say I love the series. I like the writing, directing, and the in your face style of filming.
I purchased the "The Complete First Season 3-Disc Special Edition, based on the reviews here.
While watching my new purchase I was EXTREMELY DISAPOINTED while watching Ep.# 2 "Guts" in the scene where they run into the alley to grab the walker to...
Published on February 10, 2012 by Blues Pwr


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305 of 332 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Zombie Epic Takes a Double Dip--Great For Newbies, But Probably An Essential Upgrade Only For Fervent Fans, August 2, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
NOTE: Some are claiming that the 3-disc edition is edited. IT IS ABSOLUTELY NOT EDITED. There are no missing scenes. There is an international version available that is somewhat less than complete (edited for gore), so beware of third party sellers. It appears that some U.S. copies may have a playback quirk, though (mine doesn't). On the episode "Guts," if you Play All you might see some material edited. If you select the individual episode from the menu (instead of Play All), there is no issue. Otherwise, the official U.S. release is absolutely fine.

So now that all The Walking Dead TV fans have purchased Season One, here comes the inevitable double dip for the 3-Disc Special edition. I always find this a dubious way to reward fans, by making them regret buying your initial product. It does, however, seem to be a commercial reality that continues to disappoint and exploit consumers. Whether or not you will indulge in the new version will depend on how appealing its additional material strikes you. Here is a run down of the new features with the old features (also included) to help you decide.

5 Stars for the show itself, 1 Star for the repeated practice of double dipping.

NEW Material for this re-issue:

Pilot Episode: The B&W Version
Audio Commentaries On All 6 episodes
We Are The Walking Dead
Bring Out The Dead: KNB And The Art of Making Zombies
Digital Decay: The VFX of The Walking Dead
No More Room in Hell: The Walking Dead Phenomenon
Adapting The Dead
Killer Conversations: Frank Darabont & Greg Nicotero

ALL Previous Bonus Material Also Included:

The Making of The Walking Dead
Inside The Walking Dead: Episodes 1 - 6
A Sneak Peek with Robert Kirkman
Behind The Scenes Zombie Make-Up Tips
Convention Panel with the Producers
The Walking Dead Trailer
Extra Footage (Zombie School, Bicycle Girl, On the Set with Robert Kirkman, Hanging with Steven Yeun, Inside Dale's RV, and On Set With Andrew Lincoln)

Original Review:
When I heard that AMC was going to produce a television series based on the zombie epic "The Walking Dead," I was both concerned and delighted. A bona fide classic in undead lore, Robert Kirkman's "The Walking Dead" graphic novels are brutal and surprising--not really what I would picture for a basic cable TV show (the first season is only 6 episodes, we'll see where it goes from there). But AMC has produced terrific and prestigious shows like "Mad Men" and "Breaking Bad," so I was pretty stoked to see what they do with this. Add Frank Darabont of "Shawshank Redemption" fame as the creative force behind the show, and I'm pleased to report that we've got a winner!

For years, I've maintained that the principle themes of Kirkman's vision have little to do with actual monsters. This is a story of human survival, of morality, of loyalty, of sacrifice--of doing anything necessary to carry on without losing the basics of what makes life worth living. The fact that this is occurring within the midst of a zombie apocalypse is just a bonus! Darabont and team are fully on board with the notion that it is humanity, not the undead, driving this epic struggle. So while "The Walking Dead" expertly crafts its horrors, the real emotional weight is conveyed through its characters and the decisions they face on a daily basis.

The story in these six episodes, for the most part, adheres to the first few individual comics or the collected "Volume One: Days Gone By." This is the series' jumping off point--and, in truth, sets things up in a fairly typical way. After being involved in a shoot-out, cop Rick awakes from a coma isolated, but not alone, in a local hospital. Apparently, in the time he was out, something has shifted in the world and now the dead walk. The program introduces Rick and many other principles as he tries to figure out what is happening while he crosses the state to locate his family. On the outskirts of Atlanta, Rick is reunited with his wife Lori, son Carl, and police partner Shane with a group of other survivors. I was afraid, with so much story to draw from, Darabont might rush things. Instead, "The Walking Dead" takes its time setting up the premise, introducing the cast, and establishing a bleak new world. It is a tremendous accomplishment that really allows the viewer to identify with the action, to become emotionally connected with the horror.

There are a few diversions from Kirkman's text, but they actually enhance the drama. I particularly enjoyed the possible introduction of one of the series' greatest villains at a much earlier point--rounding off his back story for a reemeergence in the future. With such a large cast, the standouts in the beginning have got to be the leads--Andrew Lincoln as Rick and Jon Bernthal as Shane. Hopefully, should there be a second season, more of the supporting cast will get to shine--but their early contributions are uniformly fine. Lincoln displays an intriguing balance of strength and vulnerability, but it's Bernthal who is the break-out star for me! The gore and effects are absolutely top notch and should be appreciated by horror aficionados. Those that love zombie mayhem should have more than enough to whet their appetite. But, and this I stress, "The Walking Dead" is sophisticated, adult entertainment that should appeal to viewers who might not ordinarily target this genre as well. This is just great TV, plain and simple, and something unexpected fresh (if you can call rotting flesh fresh) on the TV landscape. KGHarris, 11/10.
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230 of 276 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Zombie Mayhem Takes A Back Seat To Searing Human Drama In This Near Perfect Adaptation Of An Undead Classic, November 16, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Walking Dead: Season 1 (DVD)
When I heard that AMC was going to produce a television series based on the zombie epic "The Walking Dead," I was both concerned and delighted. A bona fide classic in undead lore, Robert Kirkman's "The Walking Dead" graphic novels are brutal and surprising--not really what I would picture for a basic cable TV show (the first season is only 6 episodes, we'll see where it goes from there). But AMC has produced terrific and prestigious shows like "Mad Men" and "Breaking Bad," so I was pretty stoked to see what they do with this. Add Frank Darabont of "Shawshank Redemption" fame as the creative force behind the show, and I'm pleased to report that we've got a winner!

For years, I've maintained that the principle themes of Kirkman's vision have little to do with actual monsters. This is a story of human survival, of morality, of loyalty, of sacrifice--of doing anything necessary to carry on without losing the basics of what makes life worth living. The fact that this is occurring within the midst of a zombie apocalypse is just a bonus! Darabont and team are fully on board with the notion that it is humanity, not the undead, driving this epic struggle. So while "The Walking Dead" expertly crafts its horrors, the real emotional weight is conveyed through its characters and the decisions they face on a daily basis.

The story in these six episodes, for the most part, adheres to the first few individual comics or the collected "Volume One: Days Gone By." This is the series' jumping off point--and, in truth, sets things up in a fairly typical way. After being involved in a shoot-out, cop Rick awakes from a coma isolated, but not alone, in a local hospital. Apparently, in the time he was out, something has shifted in the world and now the dead walk. The program introduces Rick and many other principles as he tries to figure out what is happening while he crosses the state to locate his family. On the outskirts of Atlanta, Rick is reunited with his wife Lori, son Carl, and police partner Shane with a group of other survivors. I was afraid, with so much story to draw from, Darabont might rush things. Instead, "The Walking Dead" takes its time setting up the premise, introducing the cast, and establishing a bleak new world. It is a tremendous accomplishment that really allows the viewer to identify with the action, to become emotionally connected with the horror.

There are a few diversions from Kirkman's text, but they actually enhance the drama. I particularly enjoyed the possible introduction of one of the series' greatest villains at a much earlier point--rounding off his back story for a reemeergence in the future. With such a large cast, the standouts in the beginning have got to be the leads--Andrew Lincoln as Rick and Jon Bernthal as Shane. Hopefully, should there be a second season, more of the supporting cast will get to shine--but their early contributions are uniformly fine. Lincoln displays an intriguing balance of strength and vulnerability, but it's Bernthal who is the break-out star for me! The gore and effects are absolutely top notch and should be appreciated by horror aficionados. Those that love zombie mayhem should have more than enough to whet their appetite. But, and this I stress, "The Walking Dead" is sophisticated, adult entertainment that should appeal to viewers who might not ordinarily target this genre as well. This is just great TV, plain and simple, and something unexpected fresh (if you can call rotting flesh fresh) on the TV landscape. KGHarris, 11/10.
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84 of 105 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Television Snob Confesses - Five Stars, February 6, 2011
This review is from: The Walking Dead: Season 1 (DVD)
++++ NO SPOILERS ++++

I love horror and outre film and television, but, no pun intended, I thought until "The Walking Dead" that the zombie genre was a played out mining town. Starting far back with Bela Lugosi's fantastic "White Zombie" all the way up through the masterpiece "Night of the Living Dead" and ending in satire with the hilarious "Army of Darkness" and "Shaun of the Dead," I thought myself to be on safe ground in this harshly critical assessment. Sometimes, it's a pleasure to be flat wrong.

I watched all six episodes of this, and cannot wait for the next season. It's an ensemble acting piece, so focus never lingers too long on any one particular character. This is a brilliant opening gambit for television since the viewer can, in a way, vicariously share the dread of "just getting to know someone" and then have them ripped away, either by the evil of men, mischance, or zombie attack. Some think that the acting is contrived. I do not. All of the characters are on edge, just up to the point of hysteria, and played consistently thus. True, it can make for one-note dialogue and predictable, archetypal situations, but what other notes might there be in the opening month of the end of the world, and a world not only ending but grown hideously hostile to boot? It will be interesting to see how the actors manage the change into something "else" as they adapt to a zombie-filled world, and I hope they are up to the challenge. From the looks of things thus far, they are.

And this makes the title especially provocative. One would assume that "The Walking Dead" refers to zombies. I am not sure of that at all. Here, the undead are the backdrop to the action, not the action itself. The action lies in the excellent ensemble acting and cleverly turned scripting. It may well unfold that the living are the ones who end up truly meriting that disturbing title, not the once-human shambling mounds of flesh haunting the desolate streets of "Necropolis Atlanta." I have an odd suspicion that by the end of season two, the mindless juggernaut of zombie hordes will be a pale shadow compared to the darker and more malevolent forces that can shape the human soul into something far more fearful and terrifying. And these six shows set up that subtle possibility with suprising elegance as the normal turns suddenly abnormal and the "brave new world" or both urban and rural America comes bloodily undone.

This is not a show for the faint of heart. The make-up and effects for television are very well done and almost entirely convincing. The adult situations, profanity, and desperate sexuality also make "The Walking Dead" unsuitable for minors. But for adults, this is nothing less than a treat and not a "guilty pleasure."

So spread the word. Zombies are back, and very scary again. Almost as scary as the people trying to outlive them. Five stars.
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224 of 296 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Why is 3-Disc Special Edition edited ???, February 10, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
First off let me say I love the series. I like the writing, directing, and the in your face style of filming.
I purchased the "The Complete First Season 3-Disc Special Edition, based on the reviews here.
While watching my new purchase I was EXTREMELY DISAPOINTED while watching Ep.# 2 "Guts" in the scene where they run into the alley to grab the walker to dismember and use his guts and body parts for camouflage, that entire sequence is edited out of this supposedly complete special edition.
It shows them grabbing the walker and bringing him into the building and closing the door and the next thing you see is them walking out the door covered in the guts and parts.
The whole 3-min+ scene is gone where they talk about who he(the walker) was before and starting to chop him into pieces.
One of the most graphic scenes in the series so far and its not on the complete special edition discs!!!

I am equally dumbfounded that previeous reviewers failed to mention this.
Had I known this was an edited edition I would have purchased a non-edited version.

I feel totally ripped off and let down by Amazon and previous reviewers not to have disclosed this until now.

BUYER BEWARE THIS 3-DISC SPECIAL EDITION SERIES IS EDITED !!!!!!!!!!
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31 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A series focuses on fantastic drama more than zombies, January 17, 2011
This review is from: The Walking Dead: Season 1 [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
I was riveted by this series. It was fantastic and the quality of every aspect about it made it quite cinematic. It never felt like a television show.

Every zombie movie touches upon the difficulties of adjusting to life once society breaks down. However, in those zombie movies, they are only able to devote a few moments, out of the 90-120 minutes, to that enthralling subject.

In this series they go through a painstaking detail about what it's like to lose your family, dealing with "dangerous" survivors, the logic of racism when there is no longer a real race left, sacrificing survivors for the betterment of the others, how to maintain a family and raise children in an apocolypse, figuring out the vulnerabilities and behavior of the zombies, and whether life is really even worth living in such a bleak world.

The zombies are pretty much secondary since they just exist to create this stunning landscape to establish a top notch drama. This is as good as anything that could be out there. Even my wife, who would never willfully watch a "zombie" movie, was totally engrossed by this captivating drama.

This is a "perfect ten" of a piece of entertainment!
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16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Satisfying Blend of Horror and Storytelling, December 15, 2010
By 
This review is from: The Walking Dead: Season 1 (DVD)
The first season of AMC's The Walking Dead was subject to a great deal of speculation, hype, and varying degrees of opinion. There were some who thought the hype was too much and that, despite the right components being in place, the show would fail to meet every expectation laid out for it. And there were those who felt that The Walking Dead would break onto the scene and immediately launch itself into the stratosphere of history's greatest television shows while simultaneously reconfiguring the public-at-large's opinion of the horror genre. And, in the end, neither side was truly right. But what is clear is this: The Walking Dead is excellent fare that has occasion to be uneven, but it's tempered in such a way that it takes its time with the characters and never becomes dull or wanders aimlessly. While not the greatest show on television, never mind not being the best show on its network, The Walking Dead is wonderful and innovative television that horror buffs and drama fans alike can stand beside proudly.

As someone who has read the entire run of the comic series to current, I can safely say that Frank Darabont, Robert Kirkman, and the production team around them manage to hit on the important aspects of the comics and translate them with great efficiency. What they also manage to do successfully is introduce a number of new locales and characters, and deviate (quite distinctly, more often than not) from the source material without infringing on the tone, rather adding layers to the story and planting seeds for future arcs and many happy (or quite the opposite) returns down the road. The Walking Dead strikes an almost perfect balance for adapting a work, expertly recreating powerful scenes that made the comic the success that it is while using artistic license from the considerable talents involved and tweaking the formula in ways conducive to the television format. When the credits roll on the sixth and final episode, the landscape is one considerably different from where the comic left readers after six issues. And that is a comforting thing, as prolonging events (or even altogether avoiding them) that transpire in that first arc allows tension to metastasize and characters to flourish.

The heart of The Walking Dead is, as it is in the comic, the characters. All of the primaries are dutifully played: Rick Grimes, the central protagonist imbued with a natural leadership, is portrayed with conviction and by Andrew Lincoln. The first episodes focus particularly on him and his struggle to locate his wife, Lori (Sarah Wayne Callies), and their son, Carl (Chandler Riggs). Shane is represented wonderfully with an additional air of menace by Shane Bernthal, who never goes over the top in rendering the character as one on a particularly precarious edge while maintaining the believability that he is, more often than not, a good man and a devoted friend. There seems to be more to do with Lori in the early going here when compared with the comic, and Callies is up to the task, portraying Lori as a strong woman focused on survival, and the deeper exploration of the questionable relationship between her and Shane is made even more potent by their performances. Carl's role is a bit suppressed when compared to the comic, but Riggs handles him well and should serve the role well in later episodes.

What The Walking Dead does extremely well is allow the performers to bring these characters to life, and that extends to the large part of the supporting cast. Jeffrey DeMunn's Dale is the calm, sage-like center, often providing the voice of reason in the wake of the show's darkest moments, and DeMunn plays him with passion and power. Laurie Holden is at her best as Andrea, brimming with real, tangible emotion, particularly in the episodes "Vatos" and "Wildfire," bringing a suitable grace to scenes that pack a heavy emotional punch. Few stones are left unturned, and almost every member of the group of survivors is given nuance. There is very little in the way of cannon fodder characters, and even tertiary characters are given careful consideration. Lennie James' turn as Morgan Jones in "Days Gone Bye" is one that nearly steals the episode away from the main players and certainly calls for a return and a more prominent role in later episodes.

But that isn't to say all characters involved are perfect: Ed Peletier (Adam Minarovich) is little more than a stock domestic monster, and has little to do with his screen time aside from repulsing the viewer as a relatively by-the-numbers wife beater cliche. Merle Dixon is played well by the always exceptional Michael Rooker, but the character is relatively hollow, a racist archetype, who is introduced in the midst of something of a breakdown, spewing racial epithets and endangering (and outright assaulting) other survivors. Rooker's acting (and a bit of timely dialogue) saves the character in the cold open to "Tell It to the Frogs," leaving the hope that the character will return with more complexity and allow Rooker to display his talents further.

What is impressive about The Walking Dead is the verisimilitude with which it carries itself. It plays things razor straight and never deviates into needless exhibition of blood and guts. And for all the emphasis on character and acting, enough cannot be said about the work done by Gregory Nicotero and KNB EFX, rendering the living dead and the gory details in as realistic a manner as possible. And, at times, the show moves at such a pace that one may forget that it is just that: a show about the zombie apocalypse. This is why the show succeeds. It never deemphasizes character in favor of the living dead, rather using the latter as a means to punctuate the story. It succeeds as wonderful television because it can go for nearly entire episodes without utilizing that selling point. There is so much intrigue surrounding the survivors and their stories that when the "walkers" show up, it is not to simply punch things up with some zombies. Rather, it is a reminder that these very human problems are capitulated by the threat of the living dead and the crushing reality of the end of humanity. "Vatos" serves as an exceptional example of this, particularly the ending, using misdirection to make the viewer dread people and what they are capable of before the viewer is reminded of the very real danger of the living dead.

Through six episodes, The Walking Dead relies on extremely compelling performances and pretty exceptional writing and directing, though it occasionally lacks punch, particularly in the wake of the strength of the Darabont-directed first episode. The finale does enough to draw toward the second season, which has quite a bit to live up to. But for the occasional unevenness, the first season of The Walking Dead powers along and serves as something of a screen test for a longer second season. A test that it passed with flying colors, audiences and critics alike eating it up. The first season leaves its audience wanting more, and it makes for exciting, fresh TV and one of the brightest new series to spring up in some time. Fans of the horror genre, as well as compelling television drama such as AMC's own Breaking Bad and Mad Men, should be proud, as The Walking Dead bridges the gap between a well-worn sub-genre and expert storytelling.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Amazing Piece of Television History, January 26, 2011
By 
J.A. Redmerski (Little Rock, Arkansas - United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Walking Dead: Season 1 (DVD)
I'm the type that can always find something 'just not right' with television, film and books, but where 'The Walking Dead' is concerned, I can find NOTHING. This show has broken records, was renewed for a second season long before the first season was over and will continue to captivate viewers as long as it stays on the air (if the 1-year-long wait for Season Two doesn't tick too many fans off and send them packing). Now let me tell you why...

The Cast -

Nothing bugs me more than how television and even film tend to think that getting the hottest, clone-like, most high-profile actors is a necessity. While the cast of The Walking Dead are not by any means unattractive, they are real, relatable, everyday-looking human beings like your next door neighbor, or that guy that works as a mechanic at Jiffy Lube. Fans can easily relate to every character on this show in some way and not be distracted by the Hollywood 'expectations', which so many television shows and movies live by. Look at the cast of films such as The Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter and yes, even Twilight (dare I say it!)! Many of these actors were extremely low-profile, or in the case of Harry Potter, practically nobody. Now imagine if Steven Spielberg landed the Harry Potter director's job and cast Haley Joel Osment as Harry, or if Sean Connery accepted the role of Gandalf in The Lord of the Rings. Do I really need to say it? I didn't think so. So yes, characters matter. They matter A LOT, and if you want a kick a*s television show or film, then choose the cast based on character, not on fame and sex appeal.

The Location -

Face it, a good majority of all television and film is not only shot in New York, Chicago and other huge cities as such, but base their story lines in those places as well. There ARE other people and places in the United States, y'know! If The Walking Dead was shot in Chicago instead of Atlanta, I would've been ticked off, needless to say. But like with casting characters that so many average people can relate to, the storyline taking place primarily in a city OTHER THAN the `Hollywood cities', is just as important.

The Storyline -

In addition to all of the excellent reviews and comments by fans out there, I've also run across quite a few haters (can't be successful without haters!) who have griped and complained about this and that and blah, blah, blah. Basically, the majority of negative comments I have seen seem to revolve around one thing: PREDICTABILITY. These are people who expected Dr. Jenner to know every single thing about this `virus' and give it all up in episode 6, and about other things that did not happen, but they pretty much thought would. The Walking Dead storyline isn't entirely PREDICTABLE! Really? And that's a bad thing how? Personally, I was extremely happy that episode 6 went out the way it did and that the characters didn't go into the CDC and leave with the knowledge that would obviously send them out to find the cure, which is a plant that only grows on ledges under waterfalls. I want to be surprised when I watch something new and The Walking Dead has definitely delivered UNpredictably!

It's NOT About Police Investigations or Emergency Rooms-

CSI, Chase, CSI, NCIS, CSI, CSI - Really...when is enough, enough? The Walking Dead comes out and is a godsend to television riddled with cop and doctor shows, not to mention, fake reality TV.

Kick-a*s, Gruesome ZOMBIES -

No need to explain this; watch the show and it speaks for itself.

The Walking Dead is my favorite show E.V.E.R - just can't beat it. I highly recommend buying Season I ASAP!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not perfect but damn close! Closer than you ever want to be to a zombie, March 8, 2011
This review is from: The Walking Dead: Season 1 (DVD)
This is a zombie television series.

What sets it apart is four things. First is very high production value, this is of the same quality as the best Television has to offer and frankly surpasses next to all movies in the same genre. The second is strong character development, it allows a character build up and you get to feel and hope for the characters. The third is - It is scary like hell. Well built up tension, shock effects - everything is there and done well. If you like scary it will deliver and deliver well. The last is the plot. O.k. Zombie is zombie, but the story is plot driven and builds up. Here is shows well that it is built on solid ground, the graphic novel it is based on.

Where it is not perfect is certain nit picking things, like, well Zombies in general and survivor stupidness. All zombie stories have this weakness and this is no exception. But all zombie stories require a suspension of disbelief and this is no exception.

5 stars as it is among the best horror tv and zombie stories out there.
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30 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Too scary to watch, and too good not to!, May 18, 2011
By 
This review is from: The Walking Dead: Season 1 (DVD)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I would not describe myself as a zombie fan. That doesn't mean I don't occasionally get lured over to that territory through popular culture or a particularly irresistible bit of story-telling. I have no cable television in my home, but even I'd heard enough buzz on The Walking Dead to be intrigued. After all, it's the same network that brought us Mad Men, and I've been hooked on those DVDs for years. Still, as scary as 60's-era advertising execs are, I wasn't sure I was prepared for zombies. I called my buddy Jimbo and asked, "Will The Walking Dead be too scary for me?" His answer: "Yes. But you have to watch it anyway for the story-telling." As usual, Jimbo was right on both counts.

In the extended pilot episode, a Georgia sheriff's deputy is shot in the line of duty. He eventually awakens, scruffily bearded, in the hospital after an unknown period of time. He is still weak, bandaged, and disoriented. Is he really awake at all? Because he's awoken alone in a nightmare world. The hospital is deserted, and there are terrifying signs of violence everywhere. The morgue has been locked down tight, but there are... things behind the door. Outside, he finds dozens of decaying bodies lined up like logs. So begins Rick Grimes' odyssey in a wholly changed world. Eventually he meets other survivors who explain that the dead have risen and who give Rick the basic info on this brave new world. His only immediate goal is to survive and find his wife and son.

Enough can not be said about the quality of this television series. From performances, design, special effects and makeup, writing, and direction, this series on the small screen rivals anything you'd see on the big screen. I don't believe I've ever seen the horror genre treated with such respect and intelligence. The Walking Dead won't appeal to a universal audience, but there is simply no denying how good it is.

The first season DVDs contain a mere six episodes, but they include a nice variety of DVD extras ranging from several making of-style documentaries to a how to achieve zombie makeup tutorial for Halloween. I was disappointed by the lack of commentary tracks, but hopefully they'll be included next season.

Yes, Jimbo was right. This show is way too scary for me. I watched these episodes one at a time, with the lights on, and not before bed. They truly scared me to the point that I could barely continue watching them. I was cursing Jimbo the whole time and swore that I would not be watching season two. But by the time episodes five and six were viewed, I knew it was hopeless. I'm hooked. I need to know what's going to happen next, but I dread finding out!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dead Men Walking... on almost every street corner..., June 15, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Walking Dead: Season 1 (DVD)
The Walking Dead combines traditional zombie horror genre with traditional soap opera, gives 'em a good shake, and adds a dab of sci-fi for the topping. It's all good -- for those of us who love zombie movies, good old soap opera drama, and sci-fi.

The "high concept" here is the mix of different genres. The zombie genre has evolved to often include some reference into sci-fi -- the question, "Okay, I understand the dead are now walking around eating people -- but, uh, WHY are they doing that, exactly?" (The answer, of course, is always something like "Dr. X mixed the Reanimator serum with the Godzilla Virus, and now it's gone airborne!")

Oh. That explains it.

The weirdo bogus science aside, this series delivers with atmosphere -- the large-scale scenes of deserted streets are more chilling than the scenes of seemingly endless wrecked cars. The gore is not excessive, but it's definitely there -- even if there wasn't a "need" to satisfy gore fans, it's still a realistic part of the plot: dead people walking around, looking to kill living people - something bad WILL happen.

Toss in the tear-jerkers, the messy relationship, and some characters that we can almost but not quite care about, and it's a wrap! It works as a basic thrill flick with some poignant scenes here and there -- it has a bit of trouble (doesn't every movie and TV series?) at times, having an especially bumpy ride due to the lack of any message or central thematic note.

But it gets there. Despite the bumps, the ride gets to its destination, and you wanna be there when it does.
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The Walking Dead: Season 1 [Blu-ray]
The Walking Dead: Season 1 [Blu-ray] by Frank Darabont (Blu-ray - 2011)
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