The Walking Dead, Vol. 1: Days Gone Bye
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:$8.49+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on July 5, 2005
the walking dead is an amazing comic. robert kirkman gets the zombie aspect of the story right, but the major strength lies in the portrayal of the human survivors. the art is great too, watching society crumble has never looked so good. really, i cant say enough about these books. i would go on, but the longer you spend reading this, the longer it is taking you to buy this book. any self respecting zombie fan should own the walking dead.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on December 30, 2006
In his introduction, Robert Kirkman says that the best zombie films are really about the characters and are a reflection on society.

I agree.

He further states that his goal was to work in this tradition.

He succeeds. Big time.

This book is a total winner. I cannot wait to devour volume 2.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on February 9, 2015
Dear Zombie Readers,

If you are reading this review, I’m assuming you aren’t living under a rock (if you are living under a rock, can you please explain how you are receiving internet service? Might come in handy for the zombie apocalypse :D), and have watched or at least heard of The Walking Dead TV drama. If you have watched the show and have a hankering to read The Walking Dead comics there are a few things you should keep in mind . . .
1.The comics came first, so don’t get angry when you realize the curtains don’t match the drapes, so to speak.

As far as I can tell, none of the important events from the television show unfold accurately. Which is a bummer, because some of the events they changed were much more awesome in the comic. Except that . . .
2.Daryl doesn’t exist.

*sob* this makes me so sad, because while I couldn’t ever finish the series (too much drama, too little of the campy horror humor that I love so much), I did love me some Daryl. On the plus side, his jerk off brother doesn’t exist, either. You win some, you lose some.
3.Zombies exist in the Walking Dead comics!

Unlike in the show and every other zombie apocalypse novel/movie I’ve ever read/watched, Kirkman isn’t afraid of the “z” word. . . I just wish the same goes for the show, because it’s a tad aggravating when the z word is the elephant in the room. Like zombie flicks aren’t weird enough that you have an enormous elephant into the room but to NEVER ACKNOWLEDGE IT!!!

It’s rather rude.

Poor elephant just want’s some attention.

4.You may cry when the horsie dies.

Remember that horse that somehow survives not being fed or “walker” bait while Rick was comatose to come to Rick’s rescue when he can’t find fuel? It was so freaking sad. And gruesome. Which I completely enjoy in horror . . . when it’s happening to people. Animals, not so much.

One awesome thing about this comic is how much attention Moore paid to every little exquisite detail. He is obviously an amazing artist, however, if you can’t handle gore, don’t read this novel. Because when it comes to all the gory details (yeah, I went there), he obviously spent some extra time on.

Which makes me question why Kirkman spends the introduction discounting The Walking Dead as horror, but that’s not important, so let’s move on.

I can’t explain why, but it is just so much sadder to read about the hopefulness and faith the characters’ have that the government will someday save them all with a cure and the zombies will just one day shake off the infection and return to their homes without a scratch.

I wish I had that kind of faith in our government. Heck, I’d probably blame the government before I put my faith in them to save the day.

❥ ❥ ❥

I learned more about the characters from one comic than I ever did in three seasons on the telly. I finally had answers about Rick, Lori, and Carl that were never answered. Hell, I finally got the full story on Jim, who didn’t even make it to the CDC! I also enjoyed not having as much drama, but that is sure to change in later volumes. *crosses fingers that it doesn’t* I didn’t even hate the loaded cliffhanger at the end, because it was freaking awesome! *hint*

Are you intrigued yet? I hope so! If anything, read the comics if you’re curious to see how they hold up to the show. If you don’t watch the show, but you’re a fan of horror and zombies, pick up a copy of The Walking Dead Vol.1: Days Gone Bye and see how you like it!

Zombie crazed and loving it,
☠One Evil Curvy Blogger
Read more reviews @ onecurvyblogger.com
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on October 24, 2014
I've owned this TPB for some time and have read it multiple times, yet I never thought to add my review of it to Amazon. Having just read it again, I thought I would just add my two cents for whoever might be interested.

In Volume 1 "Days Gone Bye," reprinting issues 1-6 of the monthly comic series, officer Rick Grimes is shot and falls into a coma, only to awaken about three weeks later in an abandoned hospital. As he makes his way around, he discovers that the world he knew is no more and that now zombies rule the land. He heads home, finds his family missing, and decides to try to make it to Atlanta, where he believes they might have fled to in the wake of the zombie apocalypse. this volume traces his quest to get to Atlanta, what he finds there, how he falls in with a group of survivors, and their attempts to come up with a new kind of social order and to survive in the face of constant zombie attacks on their little camp.

It's always fun to go back and start reading this series over from the beginning. Things were so much simpler back in these first few issues. Rick was still more or less sane (I'm joking of course, but he really does get more and more strung out as the series progresses), there has been comparatively few personal tragedies, we haven't met the Governor yet, and the characters still don't quite know how far-reaching this zombie outbreak is and so hold out a tiny shred of hope. As the series progresses, a lot of that changes.

We get pretty decent character development here. Rick and Shane are probably my favorite characters here. Their differing philosophies on the best way to keep the group safe are the most interesting part of this story arc, for me. Shane is still waiting for someone to ride in and save everybody, Rick thinks they need to save themselves. Glenn and Amy are awesome characters, while the rest are pretty throw-away.

The best part of this series is how it's less about zombies specifically and more about people struggling to survive and adapt to a post apocalyptic world in the wake of a zombie outbreak. So pick this one up and enjoy reading about all these characters. The worst part for me is that over time we lose so many of them, only to replace them with newer ones that often times I don't care about as much.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on September 17, 2014
The Walking Dead: Days Gone By is a graphic, horror novel written by Robert Kirkman. It’s set in multiple places throughout the south, such as Cynthiana, Kentucky and Atlanta, Georgia. It’s an ongoing story about survival in the zombie apocalypse. A man must do whatever he can to keep his family safe as well as others who look to him as their leader.
Excellent writing and storytelling, the book gives a realistic glimpse to what life would be like if a zombie apocalypse were to happen. Beginning with a high speed chase, Officer Rick Grimes is shot in the midst of a sudden gun-fight and he slips into a coma. After an unknown amount of time, Rick awakens in the hospital to find that it’s been overrun by (although still unknown to him) zombies. When he nurses himself back to health, he goes on a mission to find his wife; Lori and son Carl. Following a few encounters with both the living and the walking dead, Rick finally finds his family, but not without witnessing or causing a few casualties.
From beginning to end The Walking Dead: Days Gone By was a perfect combination of horror and suspense, mixed with real life and everyday issues. The story was very intriguing and the characters were very well-developed and unique. As a big fan of graphic novels, this particular book series is by far my favorite. It’s original and not like anything I’ve read before.
Overall, I give this book 5 out of 5 stars. Throughout the book I was thoroughly entertained. I recommend it to everyone of a mature audience. The book contains inappropriate language, violence and gore. The book was adapted into a television series The Walking Dead. The T.V show is loosely based on the comic. It follows the outline of the comic, but strays at times. The story was amazing and hard to put down.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on July 14, 2012
This was pretty freaking awesome, my very first graphic novel and what an introduction. Like many others I picked this up because I'm obsessed with AMC's The Walking Dead and wanted, well I just wanted more. I was also curious about the graphic novels, I'd heard they were good but I'll be honest I wasn't expecting much, I mean they're comics right, how engaging can they be?

But DAYS GONE BYE captured my attention from page one and managed to hold me hostage for the entire hour it took to read, giving me a real sense of sense of anticipation, anxiety and fear. I think what makes this so good (besides all the awesome zombie arse kicking) is that Kirkman has managed to capture the human story so well, which I didn't expect. I found myself really caring about the outcome of the characters even the ones I didn't know because they hadn't made it into the TV series.

On that note probably the most fun for me here (and purists will hate this) was comparing the graphic novel to the TV series. What they used, what they changed, how the characters look etc. The outcome of this book is very different to the end of season 1 and surprised the hell out of me. And while the dialougue can be kinda corny the black and white artwork is awesome; detailed, -you can see their breathe when it gets cold, realistic(?) What I mean is they don't look like superheroes all muscles, tiny waists and huge boobs. The zombies are seriously disgusting and the kill shots (on both sides) are amazing. Yup this was a great read and very, very addictive. Looks like I'll be splurging on The Walking Dead: Compendium Oneafter all. Cheers

Volume 1 follows officer Rick Grimes from pre apocalypse shootout through waking up alone in the abandoned hospital. We then trail him as he meets bicycle girl! the flat end of Morgan & Dwayne's shovel and starts to adjust to life in his new zombie filled world, before setting off to Atlanta in search of his wife and son. No tank scene there but he rides that ill-fated horse and gets rescued by Glenn who takes him to the encampment and other survivors.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on November 29, 2010
Police officer Rick Grimes is wounded in a stand-off with a criminal and ends up in a coma for a month. Waking up, he finds the hospital abandoned, no staff in sight and a bunch of flesh-eating zombies walking around. Learning that the undead have risen and destroyed much of civilisation, he resolves to head for Atlanta in the hope of finding his wife and son.

Over the past seven years, The Walking Dead has become one of the most popular comic series around, attracting critical acclaim, strong sales and a well-received television adaptation from Frank 'Shawshank' Darabont. Days Gone Bye collects the first six issues of the comic, forming an introduction to the series, the premise and the characters.

This is mostly scene-setting stuff, and features relatively little that will startle or surprise readers. Rick wakes up (in a virtually identical - but given the timing, coincidental - manner to the movie 28 Days Later, which in turn appears to have been inspired by Day of the Triffids), learns about the Zombie Apocalypse which, in fine tradition, goes completely unexplained, and sets out to find his missing family members, in the process learning more about the post-apocalypse world, how to fend off the zombies and so on and so forth. Once he finds shelter at a small camp of survivors outside of Atlanta, traditional leadership struggles emerge as the group tries to survive the zombies outside and intrigue within the camp.

There is little here which is really notable or transformative in the zombie genre, lacking say the different, documentary-style approach of Max Brooks's World War Z. What it does do is use the traditional zombie tropes to drive a familiar story and do it in an entertaining manner. The group of survivors is made up of various archetypes who are lacking in originality or notable depth, but there are some nice flourishes to the characters that makes them identifiable and interesting. Kirkman engages with cliche in many areas, but also backs off from it in others: his zombies can survive decapitation and Rick's hunt for his family could have been a long-running arc, but is in fact resolved very quickly.

Dialogue is often clunky and overburdened with exposition, but Tony Moore's artwork is effective. The black-and-white, sparse images intermittently get over a feeling of a dead or dying world, whilst his zombies are often more detailed and impressively-drawn than the living characters. This gives rise to the feeling that, rather than the zombies being the walking dead, it's actually the characters who are now devoid of life and purpose (backed up by the constant arguments through the second half over what the group should do next). This is an interesting idea and it'll be telling whether this is developed in future volumes.

Days Gone Bye (***) is a little too traditional and plays things too safe for a zombie epic, but clunkiness aside is an effective enough opener to make the reader try at least the second collection to see where the story goes next. It is available now in the UK and USA.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
When I heard that AMC was going to produce a television series based on the zombie epic "The Walking Dead," I was both concerned and delighted. A bona fide classic in undead lore, "The Walking Dead" graphic novels are brutal and surprising--not really what I would picture for a basic cable TV show (the first season is slated for 6 episodes, we'll see if it goes beyond that). But AMC has produced terrific and prestigious shows like "Mad Men" and "Breaking Bad," so I'm pretty stoked to see what they do with this. Add Frank Darabont of "Shawshank Redemption" fame as the creative force behind the show, and we just might have a winner! In anticipation, I've gone back through the volumes of "The Walking Dead" to discover again the many pleasures that this series has to offer.

"Chapter One: Days Gone Bye" is the jumping off point--and, in truth, sets things up in a fairly typical way. After being involved in a shoot-out, cop Rick awakes from a coma isolated, but not alone, in a local hospital. Apparently, in the time he was out, something has shifted in the world and now the dead walk. The chapter introduces Rick and many other principles as he tries to figure out what is happening as he crosses the state to locate his family. On the outskirts of Atlanta, Rick is reunited with his wife Lori, son Carl, and police partner Shane with a group of other survivors. At this stage, hope is still alive and people are just waiting to be rescued and order restored. While the set-up has been quite familiar, the chapter highlight involves a very real human betrayal that redefines the mindset of all involved. A lot of characters are introduced to set the basis for the rest of the story. Good, with an emotionally charged finale, this is a worthy introduction that gets our band of survivors on the road.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on November 26, 2008
ok, first of all, Kirkman wrote his first draft including the coma storyline way before 28 Days Later, so you people crying about "plagiarism" can go point a finger at Danny Boyle, and while your at it, tell him rotting corpses can't run.
Second of all the people crying that he was in a coma for a month with no care can go climb a tree. IN A GRAPHIC NOVEL ABOUT ZOMBIES THAT'S WHAT YOUR GOING TO HIGHLIGHT AS BEING UNREALISTIC? Your a joke. Also, it never says he was without care for the whole month. Who knows when the hospital cleared out, NOBODY WAS THERE WITH HIM TO KNOW.
Lastly, for those complaining that it follows the motions familiar with Zombie Outbreak story lines, there is a simple reason for that. Romero spent his life perfecting the story line. They go with the obvious outcome and follow the obvious chain of events. How do you think it would happen? What do you think the government would do? What do you think people would do? I'm pretty sure it'd be something close to what Romero, Krikman, and all the rest have already written or filmed. Kirkman does an amazing job. The first book sets up what happened, which is why it seems familiar.

Someone complained about the white knight saving the black family, but that's just ridiculous. The family he helps happens to be black. If those morons would've made it any farther into the story line they would know that a black man becomes a major character, and saves the white devils plenty of times.

I have loved Zombies more than any other horror film villain, or literary antagonists my whole life. I have studied the greats, (yes I took a college course in Zombies, you say wasted education, I say the only good reason to go to class in five years). My exposure to this storyline is probably far greater than any other reviewer and I say emphatically that this is some of the best work I have laid eyes on. You feel for the characters. You get to know them in a more intimate way than a 90 minute movie could ever allow. You are along with them until the bitter end. Zombie movies end too fast for every fan, leaving most with a what the hell happens to them now feeling, Kirkman understands that, because he is just like anyone else enthralled with the Zombie story line. Comparing it to other graphic novels this one surpasses anything I have read. As far as entertaining characters, and amazing artwork, there is no comparison. 30 Days of Night doesn't hold a candle. I Am Legend might as well be used as tp. Not that that story isn't great, but the graphic novel has the artwork of a third grader's scribbles xeroxed in black and white three times over. But I'll leave that to my I Am Legend review. Other people have said he spends too much time dialogging every thought and decision, and I'm willing to believe if it wasn't set up that way they would complain that there is no explanation. Some people are going to cry, and judging by the reviews those people never gave this book a chance because they couldn't see past the obvious similarities between 28 Days Later, and this, and that's just sad. They never gave the book a fair chance and they screwed themselves out of an enthralling experience. This series gets more and more amazing as times for the survivors get more and more desperate. Please, get past what those small minded people couldn't and give this book a read. It's the best graphic novel in the last ten years, and I honestly hope it never ends.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on July 14, 2006
"In a world ruled by the dead

we are forced to finally start living"

I read somewhere that producer George Romero intended NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD to be social commentary. Robert Kirkman's THE WALKING DEAD is social commentary too. Without all your stuff, your family, your friends, your job, what do you have worth living for? The need for survival has a way of focusing the mind on what is important.

The storyline itself is pretty good, although it opens the same way as 28 DAYS LATER (not that I care which came first, but I did see the movie before reading the comic, so the introduction had a little less punch). I think the dialogue is pretty powerful; I certainly don't want to ruin it for you, but as an example: some of the survivor kids are playing together and one asks if (one man having shown up after being presumed dead) maybe HER father would come back too. The other boy says that no, this man was in a coma but your dad is dead. To which she replies, as she continues to poke at the mud, "oh. I miss my daddy". It's very hard to keep reading when you stop to think. There are a lot of little children out there who miss their daddies, and it hardly matters whether it's because of zombies or war or getting shot in the line of duty.

Kirkman doesn't let you turn your face away from the camera, either, because THE WALKING DEAD is drawn with a brutal realism. If it went cartoonish, even for just a few panels, you could disengage from the intensity of the story. You wouldn't have to keep saying to yourself, "Everyone I know is dead, except for these few people around me. And they'll all die too, eventually. And then they'll get up again." I agree with a previous reviewer that Kirkman has a powerful way with human faces, including expressions. That's important, because it's the people we care about, and the rest is just props on a stage. The real tension comes from the awfulness of the situation (including maggots on the zombies; I have NEVER seen maggots and flies on zombies - but of course there OUGHT to be) contrasting with a real positiveness and desore to create a functioning human society. Not just looting stores and getting it on with whomever you can to fill the emptiness(this seems to be a staple of zombieworlds), but to raise children, make friends, and to provide for each other. It just shows that hope springs eternal, even as the reader anticipates what is to come.

So why read WALKING DEAD? Well, it is well drawn; the people are done well and the "scenery" is both graphic and realistic. It's apocalyptic/survival horror, if that's your thing. It also explores what it means to be human and what makes life worthwhile, not with preachy dialogue but just by showing.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.