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The Walking Dead: The Road to Woodbury (The Walking Dead Series) Hardcover – October 16, 2012


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Hardcover, October 16, 2012
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Frequently Bought Together

The Walking Dead: The Road to Woodbury (The Walking Dead Series) + The Walking Dead: The Fall of the Governor: Part One (The Walking Dead Series) + The Walking Dead: Rise of the Governor
Price for all three: $60.37

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Product Details

  • Series: The Walking Dead Series (Book 2)
  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas Dunne Books (October 16, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312547749
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312547745
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.4 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (389 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #71,500 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Praise for The Walking Dead: The Road to Woodbury:

“An entertaining read.” —ComicBookMovie.com

“The novel fleshes out . . . backstories and connects them, giving depth to people who remained largely mysteries in the comic books. For comic book readers, the novel is full of easter eggs and surprise connections, making it not only entertaining, but necessarily for filling in the gaps left by the comic books . . . ‘The Road to Woodbury’ is an essential read for any fan of ‘The Walking Dead’.” —Examiner.com

Praise for The Walking Dead: Rise of the Governor:

"Zombie-apocalypse stories are perfect for miserable winter weather regardless, but for those obsessed with The Walking Dead (such as yours truly), this is essential reading. This is the epitome of a page-turner, and makes subway rides just breeze by. And, that end –woof."
—REFINERY29

“An excellent companion to the The Walking Dead comic books. The story is enriched by the novel format, and the characterization of the series' most hated villain is something no fan will want to miss.”
Examiner.com

“This book stands alone and is a compelling read for fans of the series or just fans of zombies. Watch out though, because once you get a taste of the particular Kirkman brand of zombie mayhem, catching up on past issues is just around the corner.”
The Ossuary

“The story makes a great novel. You'll get sucked in and can easily visualize everything that is happening. It's simply a great read.”
Comicvine.com

“It takes great advantage of the literary medium in a way that most tie-in books would not.”
TVOverMind.com

“Not for the faint of heart, this book runs on pressure-cooker suspense, graphically described bloodshed, and dark acts of brutality...This riveting character study adds a new dimension to the oeuvre by fleshing out established characters and plot lines.”
School Library Journal

About the Author

ROBERT KIRKMAN is best known for his work on The Walking Dead and Invincible for Image Comics and SKYBOUND. He is one of the five partners of Image Comics and is an executive producer and writer on AMC’s critically acclaimed television series The Walking Dead.

JAY BONANSINGA is a critically acclaimed horror novelist whose works include Perfect Victim, Shattered, Twisted, and Frozen. His debut novel, The Black Mariah, was a finalist for a Bram Stoker Award.


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Customer Reviews

It's well written, has a good pace, characters are well developed.
Ashlie22
I hate the governor and if you hate someone that much then you know the book is good as characters feel real.
fordyuk
It grabs your attention from the very first page and won't let you go until the end of the last page.
Jmurc7

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By SteveBassist121 on July 18, 2013
Format: Paperback
If you're expecting the same thrill ride that you get with other zombie novels, you're going to be disappointed with this one. However, it is better than the first book in this series (The Rise of the Governor) and now that it's in paperback I think it's worth reading.

I realize some people are going to stop here, so here's a 5-star zombie novel that I found recommended in a WD Vol 18 review - Cryonic: A Zombie Novel.

If you do read Road to Woodbury, don't expect to be impressed by the writing. What you will enjoy is learning more of The Governor's backstory, as well as who helped him reach his exalted status. Though, to be honest, the book is more about life in Woodbury than it is The Road to Woodbury.

There are some emotional moments when characters are lost and that gives the book some merit. In addition to The Governor, the novel closely follows Lilly Caul as she struggles to survive the fall of Atlanta. I really enjoyed her moves from one encampment to the next, as my favorite part of zombie stories is surviving "the fall of man."

As you might expect, she ends up in Woodbury and I don't want to give anymore away, but let's just say not everyone will comply with The Governor's desires without question and possibly even rebellion.
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23 of 28 people found the following review helpful By B. Gildersleeve on December 23, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My review is directed toward Mr. Kirkman and Mr. Bonansinga, in the hopes that they might find it as useful constructive criticism when they set out to write their next novel. This is a great story with lots of potential, but the writing style is awkward and overly verbose. The authors indulge in cliché metaphors and have a habit of substituting perfectly good descriptive words for replacements dug up from the depths of their thesaurus. I needed a dictionary on hand in order to read this book, which is a rare occurrence for me. It seems that the authors took every opportunity to replace a perfectly normal word with some completely obscure term, to little effect. In many cases, these substitutions resulted in descriptions that were factually inaccurate. One example is the use of the term "Doppler echo" to describe a sound heard by the passengers inside a vehicle. The Doppler effect is only perceived by stationary listeners hearing a moving sound source (or vice versa), NOT those moving along with the sound source... and there is no echo associated with this phenomenon at all. This is a nitpick, I admit, but it just goes to show that the authors (or perhaps the editors) went out of their way to use "grown up words" when they obviously had no idea what they were talking about. The result is that the book feels sloppy and unprofessional. Listen, guys... Just write the story, OK? I am already hooked by the awesome character dramas you have unfolding in this bleak apocalyptic world. I love the comic. I love the show. Just tell me a story. You gain nothing by shoehorning in some obscure vocabulary just for the sake of looking smart. Stop being unnecessarily verbose and focus that energy instead on telling a compelling narrative.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Michael McCreary on March 13, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Worst book I have ever read!! I consider myself a huge walking dead/zombie fan. I was really excited when I picked this book up from the Library. Even happier to take it back. Character development was poor. The book starts out very slow and ends terribly. The author tries too hard to make everything overly descriptive even when unnessary. On top of that he tends to replace common words with very obscure synonyms. Its like he has a thesaurus sitting beside him the whole time and when he wants to replace a word he tries to find one that no one has ever heard of or is rarely used.( Constellations of bullet holes crown the lintel above the hair care center to the left,while garish Rorschach patterns of arterial spray mark the doorway) Dont get me wrong I understand the need to paint the picture for the reader but it feels forced and often more confusing than if he were to use more common verbage. While the author may have a vast vocabulary the average reader will stumble across many words in the book. I typically don't like to insult another mans work but man this is just so below par for what I expect from a published work. Without giving away the book there are parts in which characters act in the complete opposite direction the author has portayed them earlier in the book. There are also many things that are a bit far fetched for me( Again I dont wanna give specifics). All in all this book seems rushed and didn't even get in the same ballpark of my expectations. I assumed by the title that I would get a glimpse of the begining of Woodbury but the characters arrive to an already established town. Didn't give me much more insight into Woodbury than what I have seen on the Walking Dead TV series.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Anthony R. Fanning on June 29, 2013
Format: Paperback
Having been given this book as a gift, I wasn't aware of its existence or that of the previous book prior to reading it. However, I've been a fan of "the undead" stories since " Night of The Living Dead" came out.

After reading "The Walking Dead: The Road to Woodbury", I found it difficult to believe that it is printed by an actual big publishing house. It reads more like some high school creative writing project, totally lacking in research and originality. The present tense, the poor grammar, the use of unnecessary twenty-dollar words, the use of slang, and yes, even incorrect use of homophones which throw off the rhythm , made this appear to have been edited by spell-check alone. And not only is the book packed full of obscure adjectives, but also words that are used inappropriately. It doesn't even make sense. The characters are flat, the story is weak, and the plot is nonexistent.

I read a few other reviews which talk about the author's lack of experience or familiarity with the military (which I heartily agree) and Georgia's geography, fauna, and crops, so I'd like to throw in his apparently limited knowledge of injury and the nature of fire. Florets of tissue coming from a bullet wound? A machine gun that disintegrates a body? A house fire that doesn't generate radiant heat? (A modern house fire will generate a massive plume of black smoke which rises over a thousand feet into the air.) I'm guessing the writers did their research on these subjects by watching old B grade movies.
There's the "this character looks like this celebrity" bit found in teen writing, and the plotless stream of activity shows the book to be less a story and more just a prop for some splashy scenes.
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