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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars good stuff
It has the feel of the TV show with the mental image of the comics. Fast and easy read but still smart
Published 5 months ago by Rebecca Udwary

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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Worth Reading, Now That It's in Paperback
If you're expecting the same thrill ride that you get with other zombie novels, you're going to be disappointed with this one. However, it is better than the first book in this series (The Rise of the Governor) and now that it's in paperback I think it's worth reading.

I realize some people are going to stop here, so here's a 5-star zombie novel that I found...
Published 14 months ago by SteveBassist121


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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Worth Reading, Now That It's in Paperback, July 18, 2013
This review is from: The Walking Dead: The Road to Woodbury (The Walking Dead Series) (Paperback)
If you're expecting the same thrill ride that you get with other zombie novels, you're going to be disappointed with this one. However, it is better than the first book in this series (The Rise of the Governor) and now that it's in paperback I think it's worth reading.

I realize some people are going to stop here, so here's a 5-star zombie novel that I found recommended in a WD Vol 18 review - Cryonic: A Zombie Novel.

If you do read Road to Woodbury, don't expect to be impressed by the writing. What you will enjoy is learning more of The Governor's backstory, as well as who helped him reach his exalted status. Though, to be honest, the book is more about life in Woodbury than it is The Road to Woodbury.

There are some emotional moments when characters are lost and that gives the book some merit. In addition to The Governor, the novel closely follows Lilly Caul as she struggles to survive the fall of Atlanta. I really enjoyed her moves from one encampment to the next, as my favorite part of zombie stories is surviving "the fall of man."

As you might expect, she ends up in Woodbury and I don't want to give anymore away, but let's just say not everyone will comply with The Governor's desires without question and possibly even rebellion.
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22 of 27 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Throw away your thesaurus!, December 23, 2012
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My review is directed toward Mr. Kirkman and Mr. Bonansinga, in the hopes that they might find it as useful constructive criticism when they set out to write their next novel. This is a great story with lots of potential, but the writing style is awkward and overly verbose. The authors indulge in cliché metaphors and have a habit of substituting perfectly good descriptive words for replacements dug up from the depths of their thesaurus. I needed a dictionary on hand in order to read this book, which is a rare occurrence for me. It seems that the authors took every opportunity to replace a perfectly normal word with some completely obscure term, to little effect. In many cases, these substitutions resulted in descriptions that were factually inaccurate. One example is the use of the term "Doppler echo" to describe a sound heard by the passengers inside a vehicle. The Doppler effect is only perceived by stationary listeners hearing a moving sound source (or vice versa), NOT those moving along with the sound source... and there is no echo associated with this phenomenon at all. This is a nitpick, I admit, but it just goes to show that the authors (or perhaps the editors) went out of their way to use "grown up words" when they obviously had no idea what they were talking about. The result is that the book feels sloppy and unprofessional. Listen, guys... Just write the story, OK? I am already hooked by the awesome character dramas you have unfolding in this bleak apocalyptic world. I love the comic. I love the show. Just tell me a story. You gain nothing by shoehorning in some obscure vocabulary just for the sake of looking smart. Stop being unnecessarily verbose and focus that energy instead on telling a compelling narrative.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Chimenea fodder, June 29, 2013
This review is from: The Walking Dead: The Road to Woodbury (The Walking Dead Series) (Paperback)
Having been given this book as a gift, I wasn't aware of its existence or that of the previous book prior to reading it. However, I've been a fan of "the undead" stories since " Night of The Living Dead" came out.

After reading "The Walking Dead: The Road to Woodbury", I found it difficult to believe that it is printed by an actual big publishing house. It reads more like some high school creative writing project, totally lacking in research and originality. The present tense, the poor grammar, the use of unnecessary twenty-dollar words, the use of slang, and yes, even incorrect use of homophones which throw off the rhythm , made this appear to have been edited by spell-check alone. And not only is the book packed full of obscure adjectives, but also words that are used inappropriately. It doesn't even make sense. The characters are flat, the story is weak, and the plot is nonexistent.

I read a few other reviews which talk about the author's lack of experience or familiarity with the military (which I heartily agree) and Georgia's geography, fauna, and crops, so I'd like to throw in his apparently limited knowledge of injury and the nature of fire. Florets of tissue coming from a bullet wound? A machine gun that disintegrates a body? A house fire that doesn't generate radiant heat? (A modern house fire will generate a massive plume of black smoke which rises over a thousand feet into the air.) I'm guessing the writers did their research on these subjects by watching old B grade movies.
There's the "this character looks like this celebrity" bit found in teen writing, and the plotless stream of activity shows the book to be less a story and more just a prop for some splashy scenes. Seriously, the writers cannot even build tension in a scene, they have to tell you the scene is tense.

Honestly, the only reason I finished reading this tripe is because it was a gift, otherwise I'd have dropped it in the trash can where it belongs. This book is just plain stupid.

It seems that as difficult as it is for good writers to get into the publishing business, a publishing house might actually read the book they're publishing before they pee on themselves over the sales potentials.

As I'm writing this review I realize that St. Martin's Press must absolutely believe that readers are complete morons. Then again, I kind of feel like a moron for having finished it.
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18 of 25 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Thin on character development, January 6, 2013
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I'm a big fan of the television series. I haven't started reading the comics yet, but based on what I know about them, it seems to me that this book was written in haste to capitalize on the popularity of the francise. The character development was decrepit, and the story arc was slapdash. I would have expected a more layered narrative, and more involved internal dialogue illuminating the motivations of the characters. The governer was especially a disappointment. Having read The Rise of the Governor (It had its moments, but was also disappointing), I found his sudden shift from traumatized victim to over-bearing sociopath to be beyond ridiculous. Unless I'm missing another book that explores his transformation during his consolidation of Woodbury, I don't believe this series is a worthy addition to The Walking Dead mythology.
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27 of 38 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but Not Great, October 18, 2012
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I initially read "The Rise of the Governor" and was hooked from the first page. "Road to Woodbury", not so much. While a good read, I feel it's missing the same punch that the first book had.

Lilly Caul isn't really a likable character to me. Plus, her backstory is muddled up. There's the Lilly Caul from the comics, and there's the Lilly Caul from the Walkinh Dead video game, released by Telltale Games. Her backstory is completely different in both storylines, even so far as the name of her father and her career prior to the apocalypse.

All in all, it's a good read. I just wish it had the same staying power that the first book did. Unfortunately, I don't think it does.
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13 of 18 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Terrible!, January 30, 2013
Simply put, this book is an abomination and should not be considered worth your time. Even as an entry into the Walking Dead franchise (obviously not historical prose), it is insulting material at best. The author of the book, Jay Bonansinga, should be ashamed at having spun such an awful yarn and Kirkman should have fired him once he saw the finished piece. Not only is the book filled with cliche after cliche and characters so thin you can read through them, but the sheer number of basic errors is profound. A large chunk of the Walking Dead story arc takes place in rural Georgia, not far from Atlanta, yet Bonansinga apparently believes that frequent snow storms are the norm in that part of the country. He also has little knowledge of nature, as one of his characters (a Georgia native) goes fishing for redfish and walleye in local rivers. Neither fish swims anywhere near Georgia rivers; redfish (red drum or red snapper) aren't even fresh water fish. He also mentions trout, which is a possibility in the clear streams of North Georgia, but not the muddy rivers of central Georgia. Hey, Jay, ever hear of catfish? Even one of the signature characters has a sketchy background. Josh Hamilton, a large black man who grew up poor with a single mother, yet he was accustomed to hunting in his youth? I suppose I could buy his evolution into a culinary master, given that his mother supposedly taught him how to cook, but the hunting just makes no sense at all. Hunting in the South is mostly a past time of white people and certainly not normal activity for a poor black kid without a father.

This book begins deep in the throes of conflict, as the survivors of the apocalypse are living in a tent city. This should be a good canvas with which to paint lively characters, but the author fumbles this from the start with awkward action scenes filled with cliches and meaningless back stories that fail to bring the characters to life. It's just a mash of reckless violence and tedious dialogue. It wasn't until the middle of the book that I cared at all for any character, and then only a little. Bonansinga seems to lack the writing skills to develop characters that are interesting and worth caring about. His descriptions of the Georgia landscape make it clear that he's never visited the South and hasn't bothered to do any research either. Another error; almost all tobacco farming in Georgia (what little there is) is located in the south and coastal regions, yet the protagonists mention seeing tobacco farms early in the book. Even though specific locations are not identified, it is suggested that they aren't far from Atlanta and nowhere near the coast, although they intend to travel that way before encountering Woodbury.

Obviously it isn't necessary to read the Walking Dead novels even if you are a fan of the TV show and comics, but for those of us who enjoy all forms of this story, it is disappointing to see the novel realm be treated with such mediocrity.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars If you want to hate the walking dead, this book will support your cause., November 16, 2013
This review is from: The Walking Dead: The Road to Woodbury (The Walking Dead Series) (Paperback)
I really enjoy post-apocalyptic movies and books and such and so I've gotten into AMC's series, The Walking Dead. This has lead me to start buying comic books - for the first time in my life - and I've picked up two novels now from my local public library. The Walking Dead: The Road to Woodbury is the second in a trilogy that follows the post-zombie outbreak life of the series' super villain, The Governor.

This novel follows another band of survivors and how they end up meeting the Governor and staying in Woodbury. The little town is in its beginning stages and starting to set up a lot of the infrastructure and dictatorship laws. It is weird that they seem to have an unlimited supply of gas for their generators and running water for days, but this is still early in the apocalypse, so maybe they are emptying underground tanks from the local Chevron station and slowly emptying the small town's unusually large water tower.

In total, this book is terrible. Straight terrible. The characters don't develop, the conflict is imagined, the tension is created out of convenience not plot. At times the book tries to be a story of survival then it takes a sharp turn into existential political philosophy and critique. Then it tries to be emotional and takes a gross turn into erotica. The book has no established beginning and has no relevant ending. It's like the authors thought up some interesting scenes, wrote them on note cards, shuffled the deck, and made a book.

I got this from the local library and I can't decide if I should be glad I didn't pay for it, or upset that my tax dollars did.

Either way, I'm glad the book is written at the level of a first grader because that makes it an easy read and the suffering ends quickly. Moral of the story...stick to what you are good at - comic books writers can do movies, but not novels.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Ouch, June 23, 2013
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This review is from: The Walking Dead: The Road to Woodbury (The Walking Dead Series) (Paperback)
This book exemplifies The Walking Dead. It should have had a bullet put through its head and set afire. The writing is SO bad it hurts to read. What hurts even more is that I paid good money for it. Unless you're desperate for a Walker fix as I was - don't waste your money.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Meh, June 7, 2013
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This review is from: The Walking Dead: The Road to Woodbury (The Walking Dead Series) (Paperback)
I read the Rise of the Governor and thought it was very well written. I enjoyed reading it and found it easy to read.

I got this book as birthday present and got to page 88 - it is missing pages 89 - 120. It goes from page 121 -151 then back to 120 -277. There's no pages torn out, just seems to be missing all of those pages. Amazon has been very helpful and is sending me another one, but it's not just that.

They have gone out of their way to use a thesaurus on every word possible. I have an understanding of the words mean, of course there is context, but there's no need to use large words so often. I also hated how often they are using a character's full name. In 88 pages they have used 3 characters full names when referencing them. I already know who they are, once was enough!

I fully intend on finishing this book, but I hope it ends better than it began. I suggest reading the first one, but stay away from this book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars ummmmm...., May 30, 2013
First the positive, most excellent description of gore. Actually some parts made my stomach turn which is very rare. I liked it. The vulgar language was too much for me though. And what is with the "it's the end of the world so women are only good for one thing" theme? Quite distasteful. I vote stick with the gore and page-turning zombie herd escapes leaving out the whole drama and "love" stories.
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The Walking Dead: The Road to Woodbury (The Walking Dead Series)
The Walking Dead: The Road to Woodbury (The Walking Dead Series) by Robert Kirkman (Paperback - June 4, 2013)
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