The Walrus Was Ringo: 101 Beatles Myths Debunked and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Walrus Was Ringo: 101 Beatles Myths Debunked Paperback – May 1, 2003


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$17.90 $3.17

The Francis Miracle by John L. Allen
The Francis Miracle by John L. Allen
Check out the newest book by John L. Allen. Learn more

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Alan Clayson is the author of The Yardbirds, Ringo Starr, and George Harrison. He contributes to Mojo, Record Collector, and The London Times. Spencer Leigh is the author of four books about the Beatles, including Drummed Out.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Today Only: Up to 80% Off Popular Summer Reads on Kindle
Today only, get books by Jhumpa Lahiri, Brad Meltzer, Amy Tan, Jane Green, and more at up to 80% off. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 300 pages
  • Publisher: Chrome Dreams; First Edition edition (May 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1842402056
  • ISBN-13: 978-1842402054
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,962,639 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

2.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By David Carrejo on June 21, 2003
Format: Paperback
Few would argue that the Beatles are the most well-documented and critiqued act in entertainment. Admist a vast sea of literature, there are bound to be books that don't necessarily give those who are casually interested in the Beatles or those who are avid fans the best and most interesting source of information. This book is one of those examples. To the casual fan, the book will mean nothing since it does not serve as an introduction to the group's history. More notably, to the more serious fan, the book presents nothing new -- these "myths" have been known and understood for years. For example, it's safe to say that a handful of them stemmed from Philip Norman's "Shout" and Nicholas Schaffner's "The Beatles Forever" - two far more superior books, but not without their flaws and questionable interpretations. If you are an avid fan or a more serious Beatle "scholar", you may want to skim through this book as I did and see the humor in it. Then, toss it in the pile of other trivial Beatle books to recycle. If you are a casual fan and want more of an introduction to the greatest rock act of all time (including all the "mythology"), you are better off investing your hard-earned money elsewhere.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Mick on December 21, 2003
Format: Paperback
The dictionary defines myth as "a traditional or legendary story". Most of the "myths" in this book are nothing but trivia; hardly legendary. For example, was the recording of the Beatles at Hamburg's Star Club in 1962 unauthorized? Some may believe that to be true, but you could hardly call that a belief of mythical proportions. I got the impression that many of these 101 items are simply obscure facts with the truth inverted and then debunked as myth. More disturbing, however, is the authors' putting forth their own questionable theories as myth-breaking fact. Despite assertions by John Lennon, Ringo Starr, George Martin and Julian Lennon that "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" was inspired by a drawing by young Julian and was not secret code for LSD, Clayson/Leigh cook up a conspiracy between Lennon and Jimi Hendrix to write code named songs. Hendrix did indeed write "The Stars That Played with Laughing Sam's Dice" with STP and LSD in mind and I don't doubt that Hendrix or his manager knew Lennon, but that's hardly a basis for a conspiracy theory. Similarly, their theorizing on John's "bigger than Jesus" comment is appalling.
There are many good books on the Beatles. Get one on those. If you've already got those, you don't need this one.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Brad Kisling on January 27, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Most of the other reviews have said it well, this book is a total waste of time and I wouldn't have told my wife to get this for me for x-mas had I seen who the "authors" were (I was basing my want for the book based on the title which sounded like it could have been very cool) Most of the "myths" aren't, has some very bad, inacurate and distorted facts, poor writing, I could go on and on---I think the only reason I even finished it (mostly when taking a crap) is for the laughs I got on how stupid and ludicrous it was---If I could give this a negative star I would, in fact it pisses me off that I have to give this 1 star ---don't buy any Beatle book by these "authors" they all stink.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 6, 2003
Format: Paperback
Obviously, Spencer Leigh and Alan Clayson haven't written enough books on the Beatles....here's another one...sighhh. I wonder if either of them have ever had a real life and have ever experienced (or accomplished) anything for themselves, and not through (on the coat tails of) the Beatles. Nonetheless, their rantings and ravings on all types of non-interesting topics and tidbits of the Beatles in this book makes it so obvious that they have nothing left interesting to say and that this is just another chance to remind the world that they are out there and are desparate to be heard. Here's another myth debunked: This book is worth buying.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 13, 2004
Format: Paperback
I was beyond disappionted with this book. The "myths" the title refers to are nothing but trivia, and many are "trivial" Beatles trivia at best. There are absolutely no revelations or new facts here. It is also full of errors and inaccuracies. The authors approach this book with arrogance, condescension, and a lot of snideness. I'm very sorry I threw away almost $20 on this.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 11 people found the following review helpful By P. J. Walstra on June 2, 2003
Format: Paperback
Alan Clayson (author of many music related books - including biographies on John, Paul, George and Ringo) and Spencer Leigh (also an established author, e.g. "Drummed Out - The Sacking Of Pete Best") have gotten together to once and for always put paid to the many, many misconceptions that exist around The Beatles. Misconceptions which seem to crop up in almost any new tome about the Fab Four, as there would seem to be very much copying and very little proper research going on.
As the title indicates, there are 101 topics in this book, each in a separate chapter for easy reference. A lot of the topics described here are of course already known to avid Beatle collectors, but there might well be a few things in this book that might surprise you. For instance, I didn't know that "Love Me Do" was not the first Beatle lyric ever to appear on an official record. It turns out that Johnny Gentle recorded a song called "I've Just Fallen For Someone" under the name of Darren Young. This song features a middle eight by John Lennon and was recorded and released (July 1962) prior to "Love Me Do" which was released a few weeks later!
And for any would be author of a new book on John or indeed all four: This book once again proves that John was NOT born during a luftwaffe bombing raid! Many, many books claim that he was (some even claiming that the raid was particularly fierce on Wednesday morning 06:30 on October 6, 1940) but the Liverpool Echo for that week confirms that there wasn't a single German aeroplane over the city for that night or even the following night!. Let's hope we won't encounter that mistake again in any new books about The Beatles.
So, all in all a very pleasant book to pick up every now and again to check on certain topics and certainly a must buy for anyone planning to write anything at all on the Fab Four!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again