Qty:1
  • List Price: $25.95
  • Save: $19.96 (77%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Usually ships within 2 to 4 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Crisp, attractive copy with no markings to text. Ships directly to you with tracking from Amazon's warehouse - fast, secure and FREE WITH AMAZON PRIME.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The War Over Iraq: Saddam's Tyranny and America's Mission Hardcover – February 1, 2003


See all 12 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$5.99
$1.80 $0.01
Unbound, Import
"Please retry"
Cards, Audiobook
"Please retry"

Frequently Bought Together

The War Over Iraq: Saddam's Tyranny and America's Mission + Soldiers and Citizens: An Oral History of Operation Iraqi Freedom from the Battlefield to the Pentagon (Palgrave Studies in Oral History) + Behind the Invasion of Iraq
Price for all three: $50.12

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 170 pages
  • Publisher: Encounter Books (February 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1893554694
  • ISBN-13: 978-1893554696
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (37 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #249,595 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Between the 1991 Persian Gulf War and the current crisis over Iraq, neoconservative thinkers such as Kristol (editor of the Weekly Standard) worked to keep Saddam Hussein at the center of the U.S. foreign policy agenda. In this slim, well-argued book, Kristol and Kaplan, a senior editor at the New Republic, cogently make the case for a U.S. invasion of Iraq. The rationale behind the Bush administration's preemptive strategy, they write, is that Saddam Hussein is a dictator who threatens both his own people and the world, and therefore must be stopped before he does further harm. The weaknesses in the authors' case are the same as many find in the administration's-such as that the ties between Saddam and al-Qaeda are unclear, which Kristol and Kaplan acknowledge. But, they continue, "we do know that Saddam is a terrorist." Just as importantly, the book criticizes the policy of both the latter years of the first Bush administration and the Clinton years for allowing the Iraq threat to fester. Both governments had their reasons-Bush I's pragmatism and Clinton's focus on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict-but the world is much worse off, say Kristol and Kaplan. The background for a case for a U.S. strike is articulated well here.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

"Anyone who harbors doubt about the imperative of regime change in Iraq...should read this book." -- Senator John McCain

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

This book was published at the perfect time.
Perry M. Smith
And no doubt Kaplan believes it himself, that a reverse domino effect of democracy will help us better absorb the Middle East into a sphere of influence.
N. P. Stathoulopoulos
Not everyone is going to be able to accept the notion that the US should simply be trusted to do the right thing.
Graymac

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By gsundar on September 1, 2008
Format: Hardcover
As the founder of the influential conservative think-tank American Patriots who Never Fought In War But Advocate Violent Imperialism In the New American Century (APNFWAVINAC), Kristol successfully promoted the idea that a group of draft-dodging muddle-headed bureaucrats should be the main decision makers when it comes to America going to war. APNFWAVINAC made it a primary goal of the U.S. to liberate the good people of the Arab and Muslim countries that Kristol loves so much from their tyrannical leaders, just so long as none of their own children had to fight. APNFWAVINAC published the historic open letter to George W. Bush titled Bomb, Bomb, Bomb, Bomb, Bomb Iraq, advocating the violent overthrow of the Iraqi leader in order to free the good people of Iraq. John McCain used the letter as the source of a hilarious and much beloved joke during his 2008 presidential campaign.

Among the high level members of APNFWAVINAC who were signatories to the famous letter were other great intellectuals and patriots such as Paul "never served in the military but I have a girlfriend at age 62" Wolfowitz, Douglas "f***ing stupidest guy on earth" Feith, John "kiss-up, kick-down" Bolton, Dick "no bid contract for my war profiteering Haliburton pals and we're in the last throws of the insurgency" Cheney, as well as many other brilliant and highly accomplished warriors and scholars of world history and military strategy. These APNFWAVINAC members were so deeply troubled by reports of Iraqis being terrorized by Saddam that they felt they had to intervene with their carefully researched and passionately presented plea to Bush to bomb Iraq. Kristol even volunteered to join the Army in order to defend the Iraqi people that he loved so dearly and to support the military that he has revered all of his life.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Graymac on April 9, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Kaplan and Kristol add an interesting perspective to the debate over the war in Iraq. Their argument is that this war is definitely not about oil, and not just or even mainly about weapons of mass destruction. It is about liberating Iraq and making the world both more democratic and a safer place for democracy. It's a breezy, argumentative book, not really so much an attempt to convince opponents of the war as an attempt to stake a theoretical claim that something they call a distinctly American internationalism is what informs the Bush Administration's action against Iraq. Naturally, Clinton's Administration is targetted for particular contempt, but interestingly enough Bush I and even Reagan are also criticised as narrow realists.
What's missing from this analysis is any sense of history and of how the US is perceived outside its borders--and even outside the Beltway. Not everyone is going to be able to accept the notion that the US should simply be trusted to do the right thing. The book's authors clearly have either no idea or--scarier still--no interest in how a book like this will be read by people who have either watched or experienced first-hand a less-than-idealistic USA in action.
At the precise time of writing (Baghdad seems to have fallen today) and for the next few months, the Kristol/Kaplan theory will be riding high. But whatever this book claims, what they charitably consider to be activist idealism is not going to turn into doctrine. It won't because the US is always going to feel the need for the moral flexibility that realism offers.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By D. Kostopoulos on April 26, 2009
Format: Hardcover
This is a very biased book full of neoconservative ideology and very few facts....
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By N. P. Stathoulopoulos on September 16, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This book should be kept in print, and indeed it will (or should) be studied for years to come for those who'd like to form an understanding of the (second) Iraq War.

The years since the appearance of his book have perhaps given it a more extreme tone. It's essentially a selling guide for the war, which was launched about two months after the release. This should be reprinted with an invoice, or perhaps an order form, for body armor and ammo; Kaplan's tome amounts to a clear call to war and a catalog on how to justify it.

There is a lot of info about Saddam Hussein and his awful regime, his atrocities, and all of the evil he represented. But the arguments, where there are any, collapse on the first page, where Kaplan comes out swinging with his reminder that "evil exists", but "luckily, it can be defeated", and that after careful review, he believes Saddamn personifies real evil. Wonderful, a great effort.

Perhaps it's taken five more years of cynicism to build on the American people, perhaps nobody believed it to begin with. There are a lot of bad people in the world, and sometimes they make good allies, so you help them by giving them cash and weapons, etc, etc. And you don't want to see atrocities and gassings and torture, but they happen. And they're awful.

But how can Kaplan pretend such a level of outrage, and indeed, moral authority , by justifying another war to remove a monster we readily assisted for so long? Just stop pretending, and perhaps Americans would appreciate the honesty. And these assumptions, hammered home right away, make the book difficult to read, perhaps many times more difficult than it was to begin with (before the war).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search