The War State and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $18.95
  • Save: $2.97 (16%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Packaging may be damaged.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The War State: The Cold War Origins Of The Military-Industrial Complex And The Power Elite, 1945-1963 Paperback – July 16, 2013


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.98
$15.98 $8.41

Frequently Bought Together

The War State: The Cold War Origins Of The Military-Industrial Complex And The Power Elite, 1945-1963 + The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War + All the Shah's Men: An American Coup and the Roots of Middle East Terror
Price for all three: $47.08

Buy the selected items together

If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $0.99 (Save 83%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.


Woot is turning 10!
Save Up to 70% at Woot's 10th Birthday Bash! Today only, get free shipping on some of our best deals ever! Check out all the fun, games, and deals now!

Product Details

  • Paperback: 430 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (July 16, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1484080769
  • ISBN-13: 978-1484080764
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.2 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (56 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #552,682 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Former hedge fund manager Michael Swanson is the founder and head editor of WallStreetWindow.com. He received a Masters Degree in history from the University of Virginia in 1998 and since retiring from the hedge fund world writes about global investment trends, the financial markets, and American history. The War State is the first in a series of books he is writing on the Cold War and American foreign policy.

More About the Author

Michael Swanson is the founder and head editor of WallStreetWindow.com. He ran a hedge fund from 2003 to 2006 that generated a return of over 78% for its investors during that time frame and in one year was ranked in the top thirty-five hedge funds among several thousand tracked by hedgefund.net. He received a Masters Degree in history from the University of Virginia in 1998 and since retiring from the hedge fund world writes about global investment trends, the financial markets, and American history.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
39
4 star
14
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
2
See all 56 customer reviews
A very interesting well written book on the present state of affairs in the United States.
Taurus
I would like to see the book as a part of "required reading" course requirements in US History at least the high school or college level courses..
Jeff Hayes
His sources are well documented in footnotes throughout the book, though I would love to have an index of topics at the end.
Steve Anderson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Jane on September 1, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Swanson's overarching argument is that the war industry became established in WWII, and indelibly entrenched in policy during the Cold War. Today, the military-industrial complex is the most powerful special interest group, influencing foreign policy, the economy, and social issues. It calls into question the constitutionality of current government .

Though he introduces the concept of the military-industrial complex in Chapter 1, Swanson refers back to his definition many times throughout the book. This adds to the book's clarity because there is an easy-to-follow theme throughout the book. Rarely do I feel, "okay... why is all this in the book?" (which, to me, seems so common in long historical narratives)

Swanson makes the connection between war and "big government." I thought this was one of the most fascinating political theories in the book. He ties together the economic, political, and social implications of the militarization era. He highlights the CIA, the American government's own "secret society," as well as criminal negligence and government self-regulation as problems in government policy.

The second half of the book transitions to the rise of "national security" as a prop for government action, and concludes with an investigation of Cold War repercussions that extend into the 21st century. I feel that Swanson expertly highlights the similarities between the Cold War period and modern Middle East conflicts. For example, the national security issue remains relevant today, in context of September 11th and the Patriot Act. Swanson even extends his argument to the constitution, illustrating how as national security's threat to personal liberty.

The conclusion also offers an intelligent summation of the author's arguments and analysis.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Jacob G. Hornberger on September 6, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Of all the books I've read on the national-security state and the warfare state, this book ranks among the best. It provides an excellent introduction to the major problem that is facing the American people: the warfare-state, national-security state apparatus that was grafted onto our constitutional order after World War II. Swanson carefully explains how this fundamentally changed our constitutional order and our way of life as Americans, for the worse.

Swanson shows how the national-security state has become a permanent bureaucratized part of the U.S. government. He cites President Eisenhower's warning to the American people about the dangers that the military-industrial complex pose to our democratic processes. And he details the ever-growing tensions that existed between Eisenhower's successor, John Kennedy, and the national-security state establishment. His perspectives on the Cold War and the Cuban Missile Crisis are among the best I've read.

While the book covers the period 1945-1963, in the final chapter Swanson shows the relevance of the war state to Americans today:

"Today the military-industrial complex is more powerful than ever and the war state has become a bloated fiscal nightmare intent to engage in seemingly endless and unwinnable wars until the end of time -- all on the basis of supposed threats that are even bigger exaggerations than the Soviet threat was ever portrayed to be during the Cold War. The problem is that if defense spending is not brought under control, eventually the size of the federal debt and the budget deficit will grow so large that the value of the US dollar will decline. It already has..."

"The promoters of the war state answer by claiming that it is all necessary for your own safety. But is it?
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Mike Takieddine on September 4, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
In London, the so-called hub of civilization and privacy, there is a camera on every street corner, and in the U.S. someone is watching, listening or busting into your PC. If you've ever wondered how this governmental ratcheting up has happened -under our collective noses, so to speak- then you've got to read Swanson's The War State.

And for those of us who have wanted to say enough -enough taxing us to feed the constantly ballooning defense budget, enough of the belligerent warmongers populating our agencies, and enough of the armies of power brokers who write our laws and direct our business, The War State threads the pieces together in an uncanny and masterful way.

Swanson could have approached his project as a political writer with a clearly branded bias (as did Hartung and Maddow in previous books), but he didn't; he could have allowed himself to be bogged down with the many intricate stories that he weaves, but he didn't; and, finally, he could have indulged in basing his narrative on the low hanging fruit (e.g. the two landmarks of Eisenhower's warning of 1961 and Kennedy's Bay of Pigs debacle), but he didn't.

Swanson takes us from the beginning -from the detonation of the atomic bomb on Japan- through Stalin's and then Khrushchev's "iron curtain" reigns, to Eisenhower's famed "New Look" strategic doctrines that relied on nuclear deterrence and constituted a historic stand against the further expansion of the U.S. arms capabilities, and finally all the way to JFK's tears on Jackie's lap after the debacle at the Bay of Pigs, and his later assassination.

Only recently published, The War State is already making its mark as the single best book to read. It has a rich and deeply reported look at the full sweep and complexity of events spanning the period in which baby boomers were born. The author's crisp and eminently exciting style combines between a fact-based academic approach and that of a thriller.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search