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The Warrior Ethos Paperback – March 11, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Black Irish Entertainment LLC (March 11, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 193689100X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1936891009
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (176 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #14,617 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Steven Pressfield is the author of The Profession, Gates of Fire, Tides of War, The Afghan Campaign, Killing Rommel, The War of Art and Do the Work among others. He is a former Marine. In 2003, he was made an honorary citizen by the city of Sparta in Greece.

More About the Author

Steven Pressfield is the author of Gates of Fire, Tides of War, Last of the Amazons, Virtues of War, The Afghan Campaign, Killing Rommel, The Profession, The Lion's Gate, The War of Art, Turning Pro, The Authentic Swing, Do the Work and The Warrior Ethos.

His debut novel, The Legend of Bagger Vance, was adapted for screen. A film of the same title was released in 2000, directed by Robert Redford and starring Matt Damon, Will Smith and Charlize Theron.

His father was in the Navy, and he was born in Port of Spain, Trinidad, in 1943. Since graduating from Duke University in 1965, he has been a U.S. Marine, an advertising copywriter, schoolteacher, tractor-trailer driver, bartender, oilfield roustabout, attendant in a mental hospital and screenwriter.

His struggles to earn a living as a writer (it took seventeen years to get the first paycheck) are detailed in The War of Art, Turning Pro and The Authentic Swing.

There's a recurring character in his books, named Telamon, a mercenary of ancient days. Telamon doesn't say much. He rarely gets hurt or wounded. And he never seems to age. His view of the profession of arms is a lot like Pressfield's conception of art and the artist:

"It is one thing to study war, and another to live the warrior's life."

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Customer Reviews

Very well written and easy to read.
Ray Allen
Can be read in one sitting, but you will want to read it a few times over.
will
This book really opened my eyes the a new way of thinking.
DENNIS

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

89 of 93 people found the following review helpful By C. Munguia on May 15, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have read much of Pressfield's work, and was anxiously awaiting to load this up on my Kindle. Once again, he does not disappoint. As a Soldier, I am always on the lookout for inspiring books that I can help to professionally develop my subordinates. Gates of Fire was one of these books. This is another one.

We all know where bravery and military values come from... but do we REALLY know where they come from? Pressfield deconstructs the Warrior Ethos and puts it's many facets in the context of history. All the usual suspects are there: the Spartans, the Macedonians, the Athenians, etc... this book reads like a collection of essays, but a collection that can be enjoyed individually, or as a whole. I read this book all in one sitting, and was so impressed that I immediately ordered three dead-tree copies for my three Squad Leaders as professional development material.

You don't have to be a Soldier or Marine to learn from the Warrior Ethos, and practice it in your life. This book will put you on the right path to learning not only what is it, but how it came about.

I am a big fan of Victor Davis Hanson, and this book compares well to Hanson's "Carnage and Culture."

Highly recommended.
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41 of 47 people found the following review helpful By G. G Storey on July 31, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is a series of thoughts expanded into fuller sections, and it seems as if the author is trying to have a conversation with the readers. The first few sections of the book are choppy, and a bit disjointed--as if the author and reader are still getting to know each other. Once the writing style becomes familiar, after the first 20 pages or so, readers can get into the rhythm and this book will be completed in one sitting.

What disappointed the most was Pressfield's work cited page; the book itself is full of quotes or attributed thoughts (which he initially does say he is projecting upon the historical people being discussed) and when I got to the end and perused the citation page, it reads in part "The stories and anecdotes come from the following sources (although the author admits he sometimes can't remember which came from where."

There is no way I would let my high school composition students get away with admitting "I think this is kind of sort of what I read, but I am too lazy to check for sure." It takes away from the essential authority of book.

Good overall, but not authoritative.
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49 of 58 people found the following review helpful By sherpa01 on November 4, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Pressfield has one good non fiction work. That's the War of Art. If you expect his other works -Do the Work, Turning Pro and Warrior Ethos- to be anything like it, you're in for a big dissapointment. As many bestselling authors before him Pressfield uses the legitimate prestige of his one well researched, well thought out book to publish knockoffs and first drafts of his ongoing research. The Warrior Ethos is one such book. A collection of 15 or 20 anecdotes with interspersed 10 line comments that could have been written by a high school student. Pretty thin and frivolous for such a big topic. Readers who think the ebook revolution should be no excuse to publish half baked stuff will do much better buying Hackney's Martial Virtues, Bolleli's Warrior Path or Hyams' Zen in the Martial Arts.
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Because this was a short book and put out fairly quickly it seemed, I didn't have high expectations but I got it anyway because I like some of his previous work.

I read the book in one sitting and it was phenomenal. The look at warriors and their psychology through history both as warriors, leaders, and humans combined with a look at how those attitudes show up today is nothing short of insightful.

If you are looking for a good place to start, this is it, when are are done with this read Marcus Aurelius Meditations Letters from a Stoic by Senenca Letters from a Stoic (Penguin Classics) then move on to The 33 Strategies of War by Robert Greene The 33 Strategies of War (Joost Elffers Books).

A very good read for any leader.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By J M on May 27, 2011
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I admired Pressfield for his writing ability, and now I admire him for the thought and respect he has towards the warrior ethos in general. There is nothing earth shaking in this essay, but it is insightful on a ground level way that would make it useful to help the average joe citizen better understand the ideals and themes society's protectors embrace.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Felipe Wirth on April 15, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
There is a code of conduct, a set of principles, that all those who call themselves Warriors should rightly follow. It is based on honor, sacrifice and discipline. It has been a part of the collective unconscious for thousands of years. Though it is not merely a code for war, it can be used in a number of ways in our daily lives. This is 'The Warrior Ethos', by author Steven Pressfield.

I will start by saying that I'm a really big fan of Steven Pressfield. His book 'Gates of Fire' is still probably my favorite historical fiction novel ever. It was a beautiful account of the last stand of the three hundred Spartans that died fighting the army of the Persian king, Xerxes. If you haven't read that book I strongly advise you to read it. If you hadn't heard of the three hundred Spartans, slap your history teacher. Pressfield does an excellent job in capturing the feel of the time, and he does an equally admirable job in his other Greek-centered novel, 'Tides of War', this centered on the Athenian-Spartan conflict.

That being said this is the first non-fiction book I've read from the author, and it's fair to say I'm probably not the target reader of this book. It is first and foremost directed at the men and women serving in the military around the world. It provides lessons that transcend the military world, but there is a clear impression that if you've never been on a battlefield you might be missing some of these book's points. Yet since I believe quite a large portion of Pressfield's following isn't in the military, but in the average history lover like myself, this review still serves a purpose.

And when it comes to the quality of the book, it is clearly lacking.
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