Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Warrior Princess (Star Wars: X-Wing Rogue Squadron, Volume 4) Paperback – December 22, 1998


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$4.90 $2.80

Bloodkin
"Bloodkin"
How much is one life worth, and when is the price too much to pay? Find out in book 2 of the Maeve'ra Series. Learn more | More in Teen and Young Adult
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Bloodkin
"Bloodkin"
How much is one life worth, and when is the price too much to pay? Find out in book 2 of the Maeve'ra Series. Learn more | More in Teen and Young Adult

Product Details

  • Series: Star Wars: X-Wing (Unnumbered)
  • Paperback: 96 pages
  • Publisher: Dark Horse; 1 edition (December 22, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1569713308
  • ISBN-13: 978-1569713303
  • Product Dimensions: 10.2 x 6.6 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,326,483 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5 stars
5 star
25%
4 star
0%
3 star
38%
2 star
38%
1 star
0%
See all 8 customer reviews
Finally on page 24 do we get a panel that resembles art and only because the color and inking is better.
JediMack
In "In The Empire's Service", you felt the conflict to be a galactic concern, here it is nothing more than a small government squabble.
Jyotsna Ranade
The art's not bad, and there's some good character development, but I just couldn't care less for the story or for the bad guys.
Nathan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Excellence on September 30, 2003
Format: Paperback
The Warrior Princess is one Rogue Squadron comic I'm afraid is just satisfactory, not a must purchase. It is not essential reading in this series, in fact, is ideally bought if a discounted half-price copy is available.
The title, for starters, is painfully cliched. It brings to mind Xena images. Even later comics, like the Leia Organa story in the Empire series has similar titles, showing just how generic it is.
The art is just like Battleground: Tatooine, which I thought of as too light and sketchy. Here, in Eiattu's verdant swamps, it seemed even worse. Most of the new cast were typecast by their personalities: the revolutionary leader was a carbon copy of Earth equivalents, down to the "comrade" reference to his people; the new Rogues not quite as well presented as they are in later comics.
The dialogue was nothing fancy, but at least not the horror Tales of the Jedi was renown for. Plourr here lacks even her hair wig, bringing to mind how long you can look at a bald lady.
Having read Masquerade before this, I wondered what Tavira meant by Tycho's actions lost her control of Eiattu, which made her flee offworld. Unless I'm mistaken, I couldn't see what he did here that would have Tavira making that comment. He angered a pro-Imperial noble and escaped from Tavira's custody . . . but that's it. It wasn't he who liberated the world from Imperial ownership.
Tavira has better screen time in forthcoming comics, but not here. She's young and awfully cute but just doesn't offer more than the stereotypical Imperial governor scheming away. And if you're sharp enough, you might wonder why Plourr's brother looked too much like Hitler in his younger-years frames---something done, perhaps, just to emphasise his vicious villainy.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By JediMack on July 26, 2003
Format: Paperback
Volume 4 Continues the decline started when we went from the highs of Vol 2 to vol 3. But hang in there Vol 5, Requiem is an big uptick in quality and Vol 6 through 9 are good.
Story gets 3, Pencils 2.0, ink 2.0 and cover 3 for a grade of 2.5, rounding down to 2 stars for the hugh number of poorly done panels in this comic.
This comic starts with a very well done space dogfight that lasts 7 pages. Then we get page 8 and some of the least inspiring pencil work you will ever see at Dark horse. Whats worse, is that the coloring and inking is equally mediocre and washed out. This badly done art and ink goes on for 15 pages! Finally on page 24 do we get a panel that resembles art and only because the color and inking is better. From there the quality, visually varies, from a 2 to at best 3.5. Only near the the end of the comic do we see anything approaching the richness of color that DH is capable of.
And what was with the dull, subdued cover that could have been pretty cool.
I am sorry to disagree with a fellow Tampa Bay resident over there in St. Pete, and with HandofThrawn but I own every Dark horse Star Wars TPB comic ever printed, and this one ranks in the bottom third in terms of quality.
To the lady readers, ask yourself, would you rather look like the Plourr draw by Biukovic in volume 2 TPA or the lazy art drawings by Nadeau. If this is a 5 star comic, where do you grade RFAR the next X-Wing comic which is vastly vastly vastly superior visually in every way.

The best part about this comic is the introduction of new people, who you will like a lot better in future works; Nrin Vakil a Quarren, Ibtisam from mon Calamari who is important to a novel to come, Feylis Ardele, a human, Leonia Tavira who appears in the novels and Herrian a Bith.
I read this comic once, nothing happens that is particularly important and it is depressing to look at that artwork here especially compared to the next TPB in this series.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Handofthrawn on August 12, 2001
Format: Paperback
`The Warrior Princess' is probably my favorite first-half XWRS story arcs. Stackpole uses politics in an expanded role, and it won't be the last time. Plourr Illo is the main character here, for better of for worse. Her history and that of her planet are rather interesting and parts of them parallel of the Russian Revolution, which is good in the opinion of the speaking history buff, at least.
The art is by John Nadeau again, and he does it well. The architecture and landscape of Eiattu is well done, from the wide-open fields to the majestic royal hall. David Nestelle returns as colorist and does a superb job once again. Overall, `The Warrior Princess' is one of the most visually well-done XWRS comics.
Perhaps most important is the script by Scott Tolson. `The Warrior Princess' introduces four new Rogues: Nrin Vakil the Quarren, Ibtisam the Mon Cal, Herrian the Bith, and Feylis Ardele, ex-TIE pilot. Tolson writes good `banter' dialogue and sets up the four new additions well. He does a particularly good job setting up the relationship between Nrin and Ibtisam, and it is one that will continue to evolve for the rest of the series. It is also interesting to note that the lettering size is shrunk by about a third compared to the other arcs. Tolson likes to write a lot of dialogue, and he does it well.
Overall, it is a good read. Those who dislike Plourr may not be too fond of it, as she is the main character, but at the same time we also get a chance to see another side of the usually brash and loudmouthed pilot. The introduction of four new Rogues makes it worthwhile, though. And, like in `Battleground: Tatooine', it introduces a host of new characters that will appear later on, including Rial Pernon, Count Labaan, and Leonia Tavira of the `I, Jedi' fame.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

More About the Author

Michael A. Stackpole is the New York Times bestselling author of over 40 novels, including I, Jedi and Rogue Squadron. He's won awards in the realms of podcasting, game designer, computer game design, screenwriting, editing, graphic novel writing and novel writing. He lives in Arizona and frequently travels the United States attending conventions and teaching writing workshops. His website is www.stormwolf.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?