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The Warrior Prophet: The Prince of Nothing, Book Two Paperback – September 2, 2008


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--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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The Warrior Prophet: The Prince of Nothing, Book Two + The Thousandfold Thought (The Prince of Nothing, Book 3) + The Darkness that Comes Before (The Prince of Nothing)
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Product Details

  • Series: The Prince of Nothing (Book 2)
  • Paperback: 624 pages
  • Publisher: Overlook TP (September 2, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590201191
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590201190
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 6.4 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (64 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #312,469 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The Holy War fomented by the mysterious prophet Maithanet between "the two great faiths of Inrithism and Fanimry" in The Darkness That Comes Before (2004), the critically acclaimed first book in the epic fantasy trilogy by Canadian author Bakker, explodes in this compelling, if overly long, sequel set in the medieval world of Eärwa. Like many a traditional historical chronicle, the book mentions a plethora of people and places only in passing, but the all-too-human tale of love, hatred and justice, centered on the sorcerer Drusas Achamian and the monk Anasûrimbor Kellhus (aka "the prince of nothing") and their respective harlot lady friends with hearts of gold, Esmenet and Serwë, keeps the pages turning. The final cinematic scene, of a vast landscape filled with enormous armies, nicely sets the stage for book three of this daringly unconventional series in the Tolkien mold.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Compelling... Keeps the pages turning. The final cinematic scene, of a vast landscape filled with enormous armies, nicely sets the stage for book three of this daringly unconventional series in the Tolkien mold. PUBLISHERS WEEKLY Leaves most of the competition trailing GUARDIAN --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

If you read the first one and liked it book two isn't going to let you down.
Moonbiter
The world is incredible well devolped on one of the most truly distinctive and imaginative worlds in fantasy.
Michael R. Kelley
Characters from book one aren't simply dropped; we just don't spend as much time with some of them.
B. Capossere

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By B. Jantz on August 25, 2005
Format: Hardcover
This book will force its way into your head and refuse to leave. I finished it a few days ago, and some of the more memorable words/phrases -- "Thousandfold Thought," "Golgotterath," "secret of battle" -- kept coming into my mind, forcing me to think about the events. The characters, though not always likeable, definitely resonate (I'll have trouble forgetting Kellhus, Achamian, Cnaiur, or any of the others.) The fantastic elements are unique, the world-building is on par with anything else I've read, and there's even some humor worked into the text (dark humor, as the subject matter demands, but humor nonetheless.)

One warning: reading these books have killed my taste for lower quality fantasy. This is good stuff!
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Brian Hawkinson VINE VOICE on January 29, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I am shocked to see how dim witted some people can be when trying to read a book. They fail to look to the time trying to be portrayed and the roles that are evoked, and instead attempt to place a modern day contemporary point of view. Does this not go against fantasy all together?

Anyway, again, I am utterly amazed at this book. The first book was good, well written and good character interaction, but I didn't think it great. This book, on the other hand, adds to the first book and surpases it. I couldn't put the book down, not wanting to stop. Bakker ties in history (the crusades, obvioulsy, come to mind) with the fantasy aspect of otherworldy things (such as the Schools). This is the making of a great writer, one who can tie in what we know with what we don't and be able to make it one continuous believable story.

Again, I have only a petty complaint (same series, obvioulsy the same complaint), and that is that he attempts to make the names and places sound so foreign in order to bring you into the fantasy. I don't think it is necessary to distract that much from our contemporary lives, and, in fact, sometimes the names and places are distracting.

Again, one petty complaint for a book that is the best I have read in a long time. As Jordan and Goodkind fail to produce books worthy to mention, the gap needed to be filled next to Martin and Williams. Bakker stepped in at a wonderful time and I can't wait for the next book.
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29 of 40 people found the following review helpful By newyork2dallas on August 10, 2005
Format: Hardcover
This is the second book of what Bakker envisions will be the first of two consecutive trilogies in his fictional world of Earwa; the first was also in the 500-600 page range, so know what you're getting into.

The set-up is a more complex rendition of standard fantasy fiction fare: Two thousand years ago the ultimate evil, Mog-Pharau the No-God, walked the earth and created an Apocalypse that halted only because of the power of Seswatha the sorcerer and Anasurimbor Celmonas, wielder of a great talisman, the Heron Spear.

Presently, the Apocalypse is a distant memory and the secret cabal of magi (The Consult) who plot the return of the No-God and use the demonically lustful skin-spies as soldiers, is a child's ghost story to all people except the Mandate Schoolmen -- a sorcerous group who are the heirs to Seswatha. The "schools" of sorcery are divided such that the Mandate possesses sorcerous knowledge that the other schools seek, but which only the Mandate can be trusted to use.

The lands themselves are divided into two main religious groups, the polytheistic Inrithri and the monotheistic Fanim, whose names derive from their prophets. The Inrithri beliefs are a polyglot of Muslim, Catholic, Hindu and even some Judaic lore. The Fanim are essentially unexplained, but most closely resemble Crusades-era Muslims. The Inrithri "pope" calls for a holy war against the Fanim, and that war is the near-exclusive backdrop of this book.

Bakker is a philosophy doctoral candidate, and it shows. He also ruminates about religion. The semi-subversive theological question Bakker asks in this series is: what would have happened if an impure Jesus (put aside the potential contradiction of that characterization) hijacked the Crusades?
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Scott Schiefelbein VINE VOICE on July 5, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I have to admit that much of R. Scott Bakker's first novel, "The Darkness That Comes Before," left me wondering just what the hell was going on. Bakker created an original new world, Earwe, with a long, tortured history, and dropped you smack-dab in the middle of it without much of an explanation . . . and you were generally left to fend for yourself as you learned about the religious strife plaguing the countries, the political intrigues, the spying of the various sorcerers' Schools, and romantic sub-plots.

In the hands of a lesser writer, "The Darkness That Comes Before" would have been an annoyance rather than a great read, but Bakker brings the goods. A poetic style combines with the patience to only gradually reveal key details to make "The Darkness That Comes Before" a truly enjoyable journey through an original, if completely foreign, land.

In "The Warrior Prophet," Bakker hits a new high mark, as the various plots and agendas of the vast cast of characters are much clearer. The Holy War, which is essentially a medieval Crusade on steroids, is marching south towards its goal of the city of Shimeh. Being an amalgamation of forces and followers from various nations, the Holy War is plagued by in-fighting, and there is almost as much bloodshed within the Holy War as there is directed towards their hated foes.

While the nobles still lead their respective armies, it is undeniable that Anasurimbor Kellhus (the titular "Prince of Nothing") is growing in influence and is gradually becoming the de facto leader of the expedition. Kellhus, who may be even more of a demi-god in this second novel than he was in the first, continues to pursue his own agenda by seemingly coopting the agenda of the Holy War.
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