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The Warrior Queens (Women in History) Paperback – October 3, 2002


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Product Details

  • Series: Women in History
  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Phoenix; New Ed edition (October 3, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1842126369
  • ISBN-13: 978-1842126363
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 5 x 7.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,026,024 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In a series of cleverly linked biographies, Fraser here tells the stories of a long line of history's "warrior queens," at the same time exploring and illuminating the myths, paradoxes and ambiguities that attend their status as aggressive female leaders, and the "mingled awe, horror, and ecstasy" that they inspire. She begins with the British queen Boadicea, who in A.D. 60 led a massive but doomed rebellion against the Roman occupation (and whose spirit haunts the entire book), and ends with the modern trio: Golda Meir, Indira Gandhi and Margaret Thatcher. In between come the likes of Isabella of Spain, Elizabeth I, Catherine the Great and the beautiful Rani of Jhansi, who, wronged by the British, earned herself a permanent place in Indian legend by the heroic role she played against them in the so-called Mutiny of 1857. Fraser ( Mary Queen of Scots ; Cromwell ) buttresses her book with sound scholarship, while her insights and enthusiasm make it beguiling. Illustrated. 60,000 first printing; BOMC and QPBC alternates.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From School Library Journal

YA-- Using Britain's Queen Boadicea as a focus, Fraser presents a provocative study of exceptional women leaders whose patriotic and military actions are resounding proof that women have made their mark many times over in fields usually dominated by men. Leadership roles of Warrior Queens Boadicea, Elizabeth I, Catherine the Great, Golda Meir, Indira Gandhi, and Margaret Thatcher--and many others--are examined in the context of the paradoxes and politics of their times. This book brings to life historical fact from a feminist viewpoint. A worthwhile addition to the history shelves.
- Jenni Elliott, Episcopal High School, Bellaire, TX
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

43 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Amanda J Greenberger on December 10, 1999
Format: Paperback
Lady Fraser's book is an excellent treatment of her topic. I was concerned that it might be too politically correct, but in fact she has examined the ways in which women have accepted and cemented positions of power. Her analysis treats on a wide historical range and does not limit itself to the familiar figures: Queen Elizabeth I, Queen Victoria, etc. Her style is informative but not difficult and pleasant without being overly colloquial. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in how women present themselves in order to attain and hold power and to people interested in learning more about some histories they would probably not otherwise come across.
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31 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Ricky Hunter on August 11, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book, like many by Antonia Fraser, was very entertaining and quite thrilling. There was a British bias but it helped to frame the book and there were many side journeys to other nations to keep this journey fascinating.
What was most interesting was how the various women used being women to their advantage as well as how their enemies also used their femaleness against them. Antonia Fraser weaves all these women together but clearly presents their differences. They are all linked by being women but it is shown how that very similarity can be so differently used and percieved by all these various warriors. The inidivduals that come out of this story are unique and interesting. It is these vivid brief portraits that carry this book along. Well done.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Debbie on January 23, 2004
Format: Paperback
This is not a pop-history book. I picked this book up expecting it to be a very easy read but was surprised when I found myself reading through a book that would not have been out of place in any of my college history courses. Fraser has painted a very fascinating picture of various warrior queens around the world. Though at times, the narrative drags through her meticulous statement of facts, that is to be expected. I was very disappointed at her omission of the Egyptian pharaoh-queen Hatshepsut, however. Nevertheless, the women that she picks to include in her analysis make up a very good overview of the various warrior queens throughout the world and through time. It was an extremely interesting read and I would recommend it for anyone who has an interest in historical women as well as the the patience to read a (mostly) scholarly work.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Timothy C. Wingate on October 2, 2005
Format: Paperback
Antonia Fraser superbly writes about Boadicea of Great Britain, Catherine the Great of Russia, Elizabeth the First of England, Queen Isabella of Spain, the Rani of Jhansi, and the obscure Queen Jinga of Angola. All are delineated with grace and fervour and this book is another welcome addition to the opus of Lady Antonia Fraser. It is very highly recommended.

Timothy Wingate Ottawa CANADA
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Paul Lawrence on May 28, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Boadicea. Yeah, you know the one. Led a bunch of Celts who were still using chariots against Roman legions with predictable results. Well, she is all through this book - which is a pity. You see, the great value of this work to me was it's promise of discussion of...well... warrior queens. It's such a fascinating subject and is crying out for a book really, and certainly Lady Fraser is a well known author of history and she has certainly had a successful career. And as I read this book I thought that she'd done a good job of coalescing a bunch of sources for some of the characters she discusses quite well. She doesn't seem to have done any original research but she must have spent quite some time going through some obscure reference works -as her succinct notes and bibliography attest.

But - Lady Fraser spends the first 90+ pages waffling on about Boadicea. Now there is nothing wrong with that per se, it's just that first of all the book is only 330 pages long and secondly, with all the interesting and amazing women featured in this book Boadicea is by far the best known in the English speaking world and, conversely, therefore probably the least interesting for the average armchair history buff. Not only that, but the good Lady Fraser relentlessly drags the Celtic queen into discussion of the other women rulers she is covering either to point out similarities or differences. In effect the others are viewed through a Boadicea prism and given the paucity of information about her that's perhaps not a great hook for the author to hang her hat on.

That's not to say that much of this wasn't new to me and I am certainly happy to have bought it.
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13 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Miranda Good on June 7, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For all the exalted reputation Lady Antonia Fraser enjoys as a historian and writer, I expected this work to be far more informative and entertaining than it actually was. Despite her fascinating subject, Lady Fraser manages to flog it to death with endless historical references, obscure citations and literary allusions. I found the text to be so cluttered up and bogged down with arcane details and research notes that the actual subject matter was obscured by the author's very erudition. In a word: BORING. I hoped that after determinedly slogging through two opening chapters of explication and introduction, the body of the book pertaining to the fascinating women selected to represent history's Warrior Queens would pick up speed and capture my fast fading interest. Nope. Ponderous at best, the writing never seems to catch fire and I found myself hoping the next chapter would be better than the one I was reading. This is slow going and fails to reward the reader who actually gets through it. The last chapter of "summation" just repeats quotations and points made throughout the main text. Very disappointing and far from Lady Fraser's best effort. This more closely resembles the senior thesis of a graduate who has spent too much time in the library than the sparkling historical depiction of female political and military leaders throughout time which I was hoping to find.
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