Engineering & Transportation
The Water We Drink: Water Quality and Its Effects on Health and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$0.99
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very good condition - book only shows a small amount of wear. Biggest little used bookstore in the world.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Water We Drink: Water Quality and Its Effects on Health Hardcover – May 1, 1999


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$19.50 $0.99

Temple Talks about Autism and Sensory Issues by Dr. Temple Grandin
Temple Talks about Autism and Sensory Issues by Dr. Temple Grandin
Check out the newest book by Dr. Temple Grandin. Learn more
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Rutgers University Press (May 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0813526728
  • ISBN-13: 978-0813526720
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.4 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #12,397,383 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Drinking and bathing in water are risky activities. The authors of this book, medical doctors specializing in endocrinology and infectious diseases, demonstrate how current water purification methods control health risks but do not eliminate themAa theme they develop by providing a wide range of current information on water quality within a historical context. Featured are summaries of drinking water contaminants and their known health effects, a review of purification technologies for public and private supplies, including bottled water, and a discussion of government regulations. However, the range of potential contaminants discussed does not always mirror current public debate. For example, although controversies such as the possible contribution of aluminum in drinking water to the incidence of Alzheimer's disease are reviewed, and although fluoridation of public water supplies is discussed, the controversy over the potential health effects of fluoridation is not mentioned. Despite this quibble, The Water We Drink is a useful guide for the educated consumer who wishes to safeguard his or her health. For all public libraries.ANoemie Maxwell Vassilakis, Seattle
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

The emphasis in the purification of drinking water has shifted from avoidance of infectious diseases to avoidance of chemical pollution. Barzilay and his colleagues give a brief history of the subject and then look at the methods, regulations, and science behind the current U.S. water supply. Their book is an attempt to give consumers the information they need about how the water purification system works, what problems it has, and where additional research is needed to clarify or dispose of those problems; accordingly, they cite relevant Web sites in the text so that readers can pursue particular subjects. The problems include antibiotics from farm runoff, dangerous because they can help raise the resistance of disease-causing bacteria, and chlorine, whose possible dangers need to be further researched and discovered. The authors even underline the faddishness of bottled drinking water. Appended tables of government-regulated and unregulated contaminant levels, of cancer-causing contaminants, and of mineral content in various bottled waters add further value to the informative, readable book. William Beatty

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
67%
4 star
33%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 13, 1999
Format: Paperback
The authors of this book have taken what is surely a very complex issue and made it both readable and informative. They cover all or most of the issues concerning both tap and bottled water and allow the reader to make up his or her mind about which course to follow. I particularly appreciated the history of drinking water going back to Biblical and Talmudic times. I think anyone who drinks water would benefit from this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By E. Knicks on October 13, 1999
Format: Paperback
So many people can benefit from this book: nutritionists, nurses, physical therapists, sports medicine, environmental sciences, etc. I only wish the media would present such informatiion as clearly to the public as this book does.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Betty Burks on May 23, 2008
Format: Paperback
Americans are drinking more than twice the bottled water we did a decade ago. Bottled water now is everywhere. Evian water bottle was popular as a fashion accessory in the '80s fashion scene in Los Angeles. From the corporate boardrooms of New York City to the campgrounds of Yosemite National Park, Americans are drinking bottled was as never before. In fifteen years (1984 to 1999), consumption in the U. S. tripled. In 2001, Aquafina, purified tap water of Wichita, Kansas, was the top selling brand replacing that from Atlanta, GA, bottled by Coca Cola, Dasani. The back lash in 2007 of the tap water aspect led to Poland Spring of Maine to become the top seller.

In 1820 was the beginning of bottling for resale the spring water at Saratoga Springs, New York, and used as a cure for stomach ailments, called "Doctor Clark." Twenty years later, Poland Spring in Maine started the most advantageous and successful American bottling (the #1 today) of water as a cure for kidney ailments. Napoleon III decreed that Perrier water was to be bottled for the good of France in 1863. Italians drink the most at fifty galloons a year.

In 1912, the water fountain for use in public buildings was invented by Hal Taylor. All this bottling and packaging goes back to King Cyrus the Great of Persia whose brilliance led to boiling drinking water to be carted in silver flagons to war. Da Vinci, in 1509, declared San Pellegrino water miraculous. The brother of Andrew Wyeth invented plastic bottles in 1968. Perrier water was packaged in green glass.

In 1976, the average American drank 1-6 gallons a year; by 2006 we drank a shopping 28.3 galloons. Noncarbonated bottled water is the fastest grtowing segment of the U. S. beverage industry. Recent annual sales have reached 3.
Read more ›
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?