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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "Then why does he have my father's memories?"
When Errol Porter is woken by night after night of strange phone calls, he has no idea how much his life will change. At first the calls are unnerving, a voice bemoaning, "Cold...naked, cold... naked." Night after night the calls come, in the waning hours of the morning. His divorce imminent, Porter is still recovering from that emotional trauma, his well-paying computer...
Published on January 4, 2006 by Luan Gaines

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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Rehash of a second rate sci-fi horror movie
Walter Mosley's "Easy Rawlins" series is well plotted, the characters are well thought out, and the stories are very original. I am a fan of his new "Fearless Jones" series, which does a lot to explain racism in 1950s Los Angeles.

Nothing I've read about Walter Mosley explains why he would want to write this piece of trite. This book is the worst rehash of...
Published on August 18, 2006 by Grey Wolffe


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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "Then why does he have my father's memories?", January 4, 2006
This review is from: The Wave (Hardcover)
When Errol Porter is woken by night after night of strange phone calls, he has no idea how much his life will change. At first the calls are unnerving, a voice bemoaning, "Cold...naked, cold... naked." Night after night the calls come, in the waning hours of the morning. His divorce imminent, Porter is still recovering from that emotional trauma, his well-paying computer job a thing of the past, along with his broken marriage. Currently, Errol is working at Mud Brothers Pottery Studio and living in a garage-cum-living space. The only light on the horizon is a burgeoning romance with Nella, a lively Caribbean ceramicist at the studio, who inspires Errol to look beyond the painful past year with an eye to the future.

The calls are increasingly unsettling to Errol, especially as the voice becomes more familiar, eventually claiming to be Porter's father, dead for the past six years. When the voice calls him Airy, a childhood name, Errol is hooked, unable to resist rushing to the cemetery where his father is buried. Once at the graveyard, Errol discovers a stranger who is not a stranger, a man who will challenge every assumption Porter has known, thrusting him into a surreal world where the impossible is increasingly viable. The stranger draws others into Porter's life, implacable men on a mission that is both stunning and brutally efficient. His simple existence no longer relevant, another dimension offers an amazing possibility, along with a frightening pursuit by those who fear what they cannot control.

Drawing on an imaginative premise, this supernatural story transcends the acceptable boundaries of reality, fascinating and thought-provoking, a call to look beyond out petty daily concerns and question the rigid, frightened society we have wrought. Crossing the line between the known and the unknown, The Wave is a parable for our times, informed by a deep concern for the direction of humankind driven by a fear of difference and a shocking disregard for individual rights. At the heart of Errol's quest to unravel a world far beyond his ken lies his capacity to transcend the ordinary, thrust into a future of infinite potential. Luan Gaines/ 2006.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Mystical Mythical Wonderful Wave, April 17, 2006
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This review is from: The Wave (Hardcover)
Things are not going well for Errol Porter, but then he starts getting those strange incoherent phone calls in the middle of the night. Someone addressing him by his childhood pet name, "Airy." Someone who claims to be his (long deceased) father. Then it gets even stranger. Errol goes to the cemetery and finds a naked, incoherent young man who claims to BE his dead father. And knows all kinds of things about him and his family that only his late father could possibly know.

So, has the late Mr. Porter been raised from the dead? Nothing as simple as that. No, indeed. Mr. Porter's DNA and his memories have somehow been incorporated into something called "The Wave," a life-form that goes way beyond anything we know. A life-form that brings everything into mystical unity, and--well--I can't explain it. You'll just have to read the book.

If the first half of the novel builds upon familiar elements of Mosleyana--home, family, sex, race--the second half soars into another dimension--stocked with alien life forms and paranoid government agencies, and builds to an unbelievable conclusion.

Author Walter Mosley is a literary genius, and I consider myself a fan, but this is not his best work. The plot doesn't hold together well enough to ever be believable. Who or what--really--is G.T.--the young man who claims to be Errol's father? The book explains all that--but not really. Not in a way that's convincing. Still, it does read easily, flows like music, with overtones of love, betrayal, loss, sadness, and--of course--sex.

If you love Mosley's work, you'll love this one. If you're not familiar with him, this is probably not the book for you to start with. Reviewed by Louis N. Gruber.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars superb science fiction thriller, January 3, 2006
This review is from: The Wave (Hardcover)
Unemployed system administrator Errol Porter thinks nothing of the calls except for the inconvenience as they wake him up every night. He assumes someone is pranking him with the insistence that the caller is his father. Errol's dad died in 1996. As the calls keep coming, Errol begins to wonder if he might be a bit deranged as the person on the other end is beginning to speak and sound just like his father and more frightening the man knows insider information that only he and his father Arthur Bontemps Porter III could know.

Unable to resist Errol agrees to meet Arthur, but is stunned when he sees his dad's face, albeit a much younger Arthur than he remembers. He wonders if GT ("Good Times") is a con, but has no idea what the person would benefit from this ruse or could he be a ghost? US Army officer Dr. David Wheeler places Errol under house arrest until he can figure out how to persuade his superiors that we have been invaded by "demons from hell" and how to combat them. While David expects the invasion of the body snatchers, Errol trusts no one especially the Feds or his so-called dad, but admits while he ponders what next as the sex with David's wife is good.

As he did with FUTURELAND, Walter Mosley displays his vast skills with this superb science fiction thriller. The story line focuses mostly on Errol who keeps digging one step at a time only to find that next stride even more convoluted and confusing. Like the hero, readers will wonder what is going on until suddenly the 200 plus page novel is finished in one delightful sitting. Sci Fi fans will see why mystery readers find it easy to give THE WAVE to the great Walter Mosley.

Harriet Klausner
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Rehash of a second rate sci-fi horror movie, August 18, 2006
By 
Grey Wolffe "Zeb Kantrowitz" (North Waltham, MA United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Wave (Hardcover)
Walter Mosley's "Easy Rawlins" series is well plotted, the characters are well thought out, and the stories are very original. I am a fan of his new "Fearless Jones" series, which does a lot to explain racism in 1950s Los Angeles.

Nothing I've read about Walter Mosley explains why he would want to write this piece of trite. This book is the worst rehash of bad 1950s sci-fi movies that I've read in years. I've been reading sci-fi for forty years and this is about as bad as it gets. The story is totally trash, you know the ending before you get past the beginning, the characters are ridiculous, and the sex scenes are even worse (hard to ruin sex, but he does it).

If this was by anyone else it never would have gotten published. It would be a favor to him and all his fans to buy back every copy that exists and bury them.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Mayra Calvani - Armchair Interviews, December 3, 2006
This review is from: The Wave (Hardcover)
`"... naked, naked... I don't have any clothes... so so cold..."'

With this intriguing line starts New York Times bestselling author Walter Mosley's latest novel. Don't be fooled by its short length and light writing, however, because this is one of those works highly allegorical and filled with deeply hidden themes.

The story beings when Errol Porter, a computer programmer turned potter, receives a creepy phone call from a strange man speaking in single words. The stranger's voice is pleading, desperate and crazed. A few days later the man calls again. This time his language is more developed and he claims to be Errol's father. There's just one problem: Errol's father is in the grave, dead for many years. But if the stranger is not his father, then who is he, and why does his voice sound so similar and he seems to know so many secret things about Errol and his family, things only his father could have known?

Errol goes to his father's grave and meets the stranger, and from that moment on his life is turned upside down. The stranger--or GT--is the identical, much younger version of his father. It doesn't make sense, but Errol's desire to believe that somehow his father has come back to him is too strong. He soon realizes this `creature' is, in a way, his father, yet at the same time a much more disturbing and wondrous being whom the American government is frantically after. Errol tries to help GT and in the process finds himself captured by the secret authorities. While captive he's shocked with one stunning revelation after another about the identity of GT and others like him, and witnesses acts of unspeakable ignorance, fear and evil by his own people.

The Wave is an interesting read, to say the least. It brings up many questions to mind: Can innocence and survival be evil? Who is more evil--the creature who acts on evolution and survival or the man who, driven by fear, commits acts of unspeakable atrocity? Does the end justify the means? The book can be read in a day or two yet haunts the reader with these questions for many days afterwards. The only disappointing element in the novel is the villain. The story is so well written I was surprised to find such a cliché, cartoon-like presentation of the "mad" government scientist from such an accomplished author. In spite of this, however, the novel is worth reading for all the moral questions it raises.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Barely passable science fiction, but still a good book, February 13, 2006
By 
This review is from: The Wave (Hardcover)
Mosley fans will find much to like in the character development of a black out-of-work computer programmer turned potter, and the wierd turns his life takes when a young man claiming to be his reincarnated father appears. Science fiction afficionados, on the other hand, may be disappointed in the development of the science fiction ideas, which are a strange blend of "B" sci-fi movie and mysticism. The science fiction revolves around the idea that an intelligent life-form, developing within the earth since it was driven deep below the surface by a meteorite impact billions of years ago, has emerged to the surface and is making contact with humanity in a most bizarre and interesting way. So far, so good. But unfortunately the great science fiction that I found myself expecting to emerge from this idea fails to materialize. Instead, the story gets bogged down in mad scientist paranoia and mystical revelations of an approaching god-like being from across the galaxy - somehow drawn to mate with the new life-form from within the earth. The mysticism reminds me of Mosley's earlier science fiction attempt, Blue Light, and makes me wonder if there's some underlying story or message there that Mosley is still struggling to figure out how to tell. Definitely worth a read by Mosley fans such as myself, and even worth a read for non-Mosley fans for the "teasers" of science fiction ideas contained within the story, even if those ideas never get fully developed.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Unforgettable Journey of Self-Discovery and Belief, February 6, 2006
By 
Bookreporter (New York, New York) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Wave (Hardcover)
When Errol Porter starts receiving late night phone calls from someone claiming to be his dead father, he's more than scared --- he's terrified. Although he doesn't want to believe it, this person knows too much information to be an imposter. Letting his curiosity get the best of him, he decides to go and meet this person, hoping for the best. What he receives, however, is more revelation than he bargained for.

Arthur Porter is determined to see his family and mend fences that were broken long ago. Fully aware of his reincarnation, his mission is not only for reconciliation but for protection of the one thing that has allowed him to come back and make things right: The Wave.

As hard as it is to believe that his father is back, Errol seems to be the only one unable to accept it. His sister and even his mother have embraced his father's corpse and continued life as they know it. As Errol and Arthur spend time with each other, Arthur alters destiny quite a bit with his appearance. He reveals not only secrets from the past that cause great mayhem but also the truth that's been hidden for many years about his reason for reappearing. Through curiosity, Errol discovers this truth behind the mystery. After being kidnapped, interrogated and held in confinement by the government against his will, he vows to protect the one thing that holds this very valuable key.

The government has been keeping secrets that can alter the entire mindset of the human race. With a psycho plastic surgeon on staff keeping his own agenda, the main goal of the mission is terribly compromised. What could have been an awesome discovery ends up being a weapon of mass destruction. With time running out and a madman on his heels, Errol realizes he has the fate of the world in his very hands.

It's difficult to learn new things, but Errol is able to obtain new information on the human existence and information that was passed from ages ago. One thing is for certain: he's up against time and it doesn't intend to stand still.

Walter Mosley takes readers on an unforgettable journey of self-discovery and belief, leaving you to question what's real. Although written as fiction, this storyline exercises your mind, forcing you to examine governmental dealings and the notion of other world exchanges. Eerily evoking emotion and deep thought, Mosley has done it again. THE WAVE is an excellent read and a thought-provoking story.

--- Reviewed by Belinda Williams
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Wave by Walter Mosley: An PeoplewholoveGoodBooks Review, January 23, 2006
This review is from: The Wave (Hardcover)
Errol Porter has been receiving prank phone calls late at night. Imagine his shock when the caller claims to be his father--his father who died 6 years ago!! Errol doesn't know what to believe especially since the person who is calling seems to know things that only the 2 of them could know. Finally, his curiousity gets the best of him and Errol agrees to meet. Shocked by the man with his father's face, Errol begins to wonder what exactly is going on.......is this man a ghost? his father's long-lost twin? or something more unexplainable? Now Errol is being pursued by the military in an effort to cover things up and keep him quiet.

The Wave is unlike anything I've read before, science fiction is not usually my genre but being a fan of Walter Mosley's Easy Rawlins books, I decided to give it a try anyway. It is a book that all mystery and science fiction fans will try enjoy. Walter Mosley has proven to be versatile with his writing. From the Easy Rawlins stories to Blue Light to The Wave--a story that is sure to please all of his fans. I give this book 4 stars. Reviewed by Shay C of PeoplewholoveGoodBooks
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This Man Can Write, January 31, 2006
By 
Michael Charles (Long Beach, NY USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Wave (Hardcover)
When I think of Walter Mosley I think of Easy Rawlins and a rollicking, yet noirish treatment in the private eye genre. If you're expecting this, The Wave will disappoint but it is certainly not a disappointing book. Mosley can write and he can write science fiction very well, as this novel proves. Mosley's hero, Errol Porter, is a middle aged black man trying to cope with life. One night he's awakened by an eerie telephone call from someone claiming to be his long dead father. Errol visits his father's grave and finds a younger version of the man he remembered as dad who tells him he's his father but also actually part of an ancient race of single-cell creatures making their way from under the earth to meet their fate. Errol's amorous adventures with a free-spirited girl friend, imprisonment by a mad government scientist and his military minions and the slaughter of a benevolent race plus much more makes this quick reading story (only 209 pages) a pleasure. It will leave you thinking. I can picture the movie now.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars WELL READ SCI-FI FROM THE MASTERFUL MOSLEY, February 13, 2006
This review is from: The Wave (Audio CD)
Walter Mosley fans are in for a surprise with The Wave - no more Easy Rawlins or Fearless Jones, but for the third time this author ventures into the world of science fiction. It's his 19th novel, and I've lost count of his awards, an O. Henry, a Grammy, a Sundance Institute Risk-Taker Award. There seem to be few writers who can switch genres as flawlessly as he does. Simply goes to prove what we've known all along - Walter Mosley is one terrific wordsmith.

With The Wave we meet Errol Porter who is receiving what he believes to be crank phone calls. Perhaps, he thinks, someone in a mental institution has gotten his number and put it on redial. With the first call all he heard were moans and grunts. It was a man's voice. With the second call he heard single words - cold, naked. There's cause for concern when the caller claims to be Errol's father who died and was buried in 1996.

It is only when Errol visits the site of his father's grave that he begins to learn of `the wave,' an incredible force that can bring corpses back to life in great good health with their minds and memories intact. What then would happen to our world as we know it? To further complicate matters Errol is grabbed by a psychotic scientist and taken to a frightening underground world.

Narrator Tim Cain's deep, resonant voice is particularly appropriate for this tale of suspenseful horror. With pacing and nuance he carries listeners along to a shocking conclusion.

- Gail Cooke
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The Wave
The Wave by Walter Mosley (Hardcover - January 3, 2006)
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