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The Way We Move

June 5, 2012 | Format: MP3

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Popularity Prime  
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4:21
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Product Details

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
This record continues in the evolution of Langhorne Slim. From start to finish, this is by far their best record to date. From the first few seconds of the opening track "The Way We Move," one will instinctively find their foot begins to tap along to the beat of the song, and this will not stop until the entire album is over. There are several stand-out tracks for me. First, the song "Past Lives" is one of Slim's best ever. The delivery of his vocals in this song gives me chills. "Song For Sid" is about Sean's grandfather who passed away, with lyrics as honest as you can get. You can tell by this song Sid must have been one hell of a guy. "Someday", although clocking in at 1:26, is so catchy I find myself singing it in my head all day. Really, though, there isn't a bad track here. This is such a great album from beginning to end. Those familiar with the music of Langhorne Slim will be at home with the songs on this record, and they just seem so much more fresh than any of the other music that's out there today. Scolnick's voice is so raw and so emotional, filled with such honesty that few can match. The band said they wanted to make something they could stand by and be proud of for the rest of their lives. With this record, they have.
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Format: Audio CD
I first heard Langhorne Slim and his band, The Law, on the David Letterman show a few years ago and was blown away. Enter the youtubes, the downloads on my ipod and I'm a die-hard fan. They have a sound to them that is hard to pin down; sort of a mixture of blues, rock-indie, folk and country. You'll find yourself comparing Langhorne with Bob Dylan. Langhorne's voice is a raspy, heartfelt mixture of up-tempo and great rhythm, which belies the messages of relationship tragedy.

If you're new to them, this album is a great introduction. If you're already a fan, you will not be disappointed. This is their best album yet, with the same great quality of music and lyrics we've come to expect from Langhorne.

His back-up musicians are perfect and complement him in every way.

These are the kinds of songs that stick with you. This is honest music and there isn't a bad song on the album. You'll find yourself humming one of the tunes later in the day.

While some of the songs are about heartbreak, there's always an underlining element of optimism.

I dare you not to cry while listening to "Song for Sid", written in memory of Langhorne's grandfather's recent passing. Langford's line, "where do the great ones go when they're gone" is haunting and soulful.

While they've been on the periphery of fame for quite awhile, I think this album will put them where they belong...at the top.
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Format: MP3 Music
I have each album put out by the band. A unique voice, solidly skewed lyrics, and genre defying music; add the mix together and it is time to turn up the volume to enjoy loud music and loud lyrics--in a good way. This album is a cross between alt country, rock, and a little bit of punk to give it an attitude. If you appreciate original lyrics, toe-tapping music, and a voice that sounds like no other, you will enjoy this one-of-a-kind album. Don't believe me? Listen to the song samples and become a believer.
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Format: MP3 Music
'The Way We Move' is Langhorne Slim & the Law in great form. A few particular highlights for me were: (1) The title track is classic Langhorne in the call-and-response vein of 2009's 'Cinderella' or 2005's 'And If It's True'. (2) 'Song For Sid', a tribute to Slim's grandfather. (3) The piano-driven 'Past Lives', which captures the grit in Slim's soulful voice that always comes out in the band's energetic live performances.
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Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
This album is just great americana, a modern classic, and downright fun to listen to. Feels loose and live but polished. Each song sounds like something you should have heard by now. Most of these songs would sound just as good with just a guitar and vocal, or with a giant band.
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Format: Audio CD
You know the movie where the guy's in the interrogation room of the Police Station, he hasn't really been charged with anything, he knows he's innocent, except for perhaps the bag of weed they found in the glovebox of his car, and that's no big deal and he knows it, but they keep on hammering him just to see what shakes loose ... and despite his inner voice, the guy just won't keep his mouth shut.

David Moore is that guy, on The Way We Move he can be heard laying out all of his cards on the table, at least the ones that make sense, and tossing the rest at the wobbling ceiling fan, just to see what happens. With a stoner's noble sense of honesty he explains, cajoles, and side steps, hoping to be out on the street before his car gets towed ... but that's a moot point right now, because all he's ever wanted was to be understood, and to that end he just rolls on. Moore's songs are explanations, brilliantly delivered, often with a frustrated falsetto, full of emotion, laced with a rye banter and a pocket full of endless grooves that just keep on coming.

Moore's a kid in an adult body, still frustrated over ninth grade crushes, the love of his grandparents, good luck gone bad, and is forever placing his heart on his sleeve. Some people might try to convince you this is bluesy rock, but it's more, it's pure Americana, the kind of songs that come from nowhere else in the world, with sensational thoughtful considered lyrics that will have you swinging from stars and hanging on every jazzy note of the snappy snare drum ... notes punctuated by a gritty electric honky tonk piano that will roll right over you, while the guitars and fancy finger picking dance right across your head for good measure.
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