The Way Out and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$12.56
Qty:1
  • List Price: $13.95
  • Save: $1.39 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Way Out Paperback – December 14, 2012


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.56
$8.56 $7.96
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New Adult Fiction by Rainbow Rowell
Acclaimed author Rainbow Rowell's latest book, Landline, offers a poignant, humorous look at relationships and marriage. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 344 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (December 14, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1478321415
  • ISBN-13: 978-1478321415
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,811,576 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Choi offers a sobering glimpse into life on both sides of  the Korean Demilitarized Zone.  An insightful, moving tale of one family’s struggle to  survive the Korean War and its aftermath.
 --- “Kirkus Reviews”

About the Author

“Were you stationed in Pusan around 1952?” Whenever she meets a veteran of the Korean War, Meg asks. Meg Choi spent her childhood near Kim Il-sung’s hometown, Mankyungdai, North Korea. Fearful of their lives under Communism, her parents fled to South Korea leaving two year-old Meg behind with Grandparents. She lived there until seven, when General MacArthur’s army came and was able to reunite her with her parents and three younger siblings. While living in Pusan as refugees, another sister was born. As the oldest with Mother in poor health, Meg took care of the baby while doing whatever housework she could, often with disastrous outcomes. U.S. soldiers took pictures of Meg with a baby on her back. Happily she modeled for them thinking she was irresistibly pretty. One soldier visited her repeatedly. He gave her toys, chocolate, and even a Barbie, but not to her siblings. It made her feel “special”, but being the oldest, she had to give them away. Once he found her without the baby on her back, he carried her on his back. How she’d loved to be hugged and cared for! She felt heavenly: warm, comfortable, and big. She didn’t have to share this “special” with anyone. His shoulders were for her. She wanted to learn English and get an education so she could go to America. She wanted to find the soldier and thank him. She has lived in the U.S. over 40 years, but has yet to find the soldier who instilled love and hope. She’d ask any veteran of the Korean War, “Were you in Pusan in 1952?” She wishes to return his love. She wants to tell the story before it’s too late. Her heart aches knowing there are many in this world who live in misery, hunger, and fear. She hopes somehow, someway, God willing, the people of North Korea and others like them can enjoy freedom and human rights just like you and me. Meg has authored eleven nonfiction books in Korean; one of them, Aim for Harvard Instead of SNU (Seoul National University), was a bestseller in Korea. She lives in Milwaukee, Wisconsin with her husband.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Great historical fiction for incite into the lives of people, families struggling during the Korean War. While the writing a little choppy, author writing in her second language, it seems to add a credible "voice"to the story. The tale becomes a compelling read once the scene is set. The contrast presented between freedom and totalitarianism is striking and timely message. While living in freedom it is too easy to forget what many amongst us have had overcome to be here.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Hoyle Leigh on May 9, 2013
Format: Paperback
This is a sensitive and moving novel about a Korean family who lived through the Korean War and how the individual members fared with the scars of the "forgotten" war. The author, Meg Choi, is an accomplished writer who herself lived through the Korean War. The story rings true, and is told with compassion and passion. The novel is a page-turner, especially in the latter half of the book where the "plot thickens". Many of us heard of the North Korean man who shot his wife when she criticized the "dear leader" in front of him. In this fiction, this tragic event becomes an inevitable human drama.

The protagonist, Mia's middle class family is divided within itself as half of the family became idealistic Communists in North Korea, and the other half, including Mia and her mother, survived the war in South Korea, where they were blacklisted as the missing father was considered to be a Communist. Mia, as a young child during the war (1950-53), eked out a living for her mother and her brother as a "shoe-shine boy". She then entered an orphanage in order to go to school. Eventually, she becomes a physician and emigrates to the United States. As an American, she visits her sisters in North Korea, and witnesses the harshness and misery of the dictatorial regime. Mia determines herself to help at least one younger member of her family still in North Korea.

This is a defining novel in English about the Korean War and Korean immigrants to the United States. For anyone with an interest in how the two Koreas became so different, and anyone who is interested in reading a moving story of a close-knit but ideologically divided family, and a young woman who makes it against all odds, this book will be highly satisfying.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Meg Choi crafts a compelling story of lifelike characters during the and following the Korean conflict. The eventual emmigration and return visit to North Korea are hear wrenching. I recommend this book!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition
This is a book that opens a new world. Well written -- compelling. We're blessed to have this vision of Korea. Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search