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The Wayfarer Redemption Paperback – 2001


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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: TOR (2001)
  • ASIN: B0018Y7LXG
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.8 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (197 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,969,256 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Sara Douglass was born in Penola, South Australia, and spent her early working life as a nurse. Rapidly growing tired of starched veils, mitred corners and irascible anaesthetists, she worked her way through three degrees at the University of Adelaide, culminating in a PhD in early modern English history. Sara Douglass currently teaches medieval history of La Trobe University, Bendigo and escapes academia through her writing.

Customer Reviews

I loved this book, I couldn't stop reading it!
Dozer
The main female character, Faraday, who weilds more power than many of the other characters, is like a 10 year old child rather than a supposed 18-year-old.
Zoe Van Dijk
Because there was essentially no character development, the book hinges on action to move it along.
wysewomon

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 34 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 1, 2001
Format: Hardcover
After reading some of the other reviews on this site, I was given the impression that Ms. Douglass' books were absolutely terrible! However, I was recommended by a friend of mine (A Mr Jason Byrne of Australia) to have a look at the series, and tell him what I thought... and all I can really say is wow!
The Plot was fresh and exciting, without being overly complicated or simple. There were plenty of twists and turns within the novel which made this book simply un-putdownable, and the character development was excellent. Unlike many other fantasy novels, where you feel like an observer on the battle feild, or in the castle, in Ms. Douglass' books you can actually put yourself in the character's shoes and identify with them! It was a very refreshing change!
The setting of the book is a mythical land that was once called Tencendor. The series follows the escapades of Axis, a man born of human and bird-man blood, and his son, Drago. While this brief (extremely brief!) description may lead you to believe that the story line is cliched/unoriginal (how many stories have you read with bird people? Countless!), I can ssure you that Ms. Douglass gives every character within her plot a unique and unmistakable "Douglass touch" which leaves you in no doubt that her story is not some re-hashed script, but a refreshing, living, in-a-class-of-it's-own story-line, and leaves you wondering why you hadn't discovered Ms. Douglass sooner.
I can not express my delight in finding out that not only has Ms. Douglass finished all six books in this series (don't let the amount put you off, it'll seem like they're not long enough!), but her new series, entitled the Crucible is half way through completion! I can't wait.
I would also like to express my appreciation of Ms.
Read more ›
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 18, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I read this book before having read the reviews. I had never heard of Sara Douglass. While I don't really prefer prophesy-based stories, and thought the "Sentinels" a substandard device, I thought the characters in this one more than made up for that deficiency. They don't act from the same motives that modern characters might, but isn't that a plus for a fantasy novel? Their motives are consistent with the setting. I plan to read the others in the series.
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35 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Mark Erikson on November 23, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Poorly written, ridiculous plot, utterly unbelievable characters. As an Australian, I picked this series up and read the whole lot - only because they were the only books I had with me on a camping trip - because I wanted to see what Australian authors had to offer the fantasy genre.

What I got was a horrible mess of half formed ideas and crummy one dimensional characters. Sara Douglass' idea of 'gritty' is to make the characters heartless and amoral beyond any reason in one moment, and yet noble and true the next. All the while, every character speaks like an English professor, from the lowest horse-handler to the highest lord. The characters are all so similar and poorly conceived that they barely remain in the memory after the book is closed.

The plot is terrible. A baddie who can only be described as that: a baddie. He belongs in a child's cartoon - a bad one - not an epic fantasy series. Most of the decisions made make very little sense, nobody important dies, and Sara Douglass even manages to incorporate some flying saucers with shiny, flashy lights.

I cannot believe these books sell at all, and I really cannot believe they sell in America. If you want real fantasy, read George RR Martin, or Steven Erikson, or Robert Jordan. If you like easy-reading fantasy, even Eddings is better than Sara Douglass.

Please, don't waste your money.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Charles A. Wheeler on November 23, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I bought the book a couple of months ago and tried to read it. It seemed pretty formulatic but I thought, "maybe I'm just groucy". I put it aside and read Robin Hobb's fantastic new "Tawny Man". Then I came back to try again. It is like eating fast food after a five star restuarant, pretty disappointing. The second try got me to about page 70 before I gave up. By then I'd pretty much figured out what the characters were supposed to be and was tired of the stilted language and inanities uttered by the main ones. (I considered and discarded the possibility that Ms Douglass was deliberately trying for campyness - like the first Star Wars) There is just no one believable to an adult in the book but I do understand the 5 star review by the 12 year old reader and I wish him great reading as he grows. As he matures he can look forward to reading George R. R. Martin who is good and to Robin who is wonderful. Martha Wells is also very good, but above that, he can go out and find any of C.J.Cherryh's really fine fantasy (start with Fortress in the Eye of Time, young friend). These are not the names I generally see in the reviews on line and as a result I have tempered my expectations and forced myself to consider the source of any recommendation. Fantasy is a very hard genre to write well. You must be able to create a consistent and believable world and allow the reader to slowly uncover the thoughts and motivations of the creatures in that world. You must also give the reader some discretion and leave him with some ambiguity. Douglass doesn't do that. Neither do J.V. Jones or Robert Jordan (who my sons loved in their early teens)so there is no reason she won't be enourmously successful. Should it have meaning beyond the story?Read more ›
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