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The Wealth of Nations: Books 1-3 (Penguin Classics) (Bks.1-3) Paperback


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The Wealth of Nations: Books 1-3 (Penguin Classics) (Bks.1-3) + The Theory of Moral Sentiments
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Product Details

  • Series: Penguin Classics
  • Paperback: 544 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics (March 25, 1982)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140432086
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140432084
  • Product Dimensions: 2 x 3.1 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #73,071 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Adam Smith (1723-90) taught both logic and moral philosophy at Glasgow University. His Wealth of Nations revolutionised the economic theories of the time. Andrew Skinner teaches at the Adam Smith Institute and is an expert on the author's work.

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Customer Reviews

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Treat your farmers well.
Margaret Magnus
This information is a good antidote to the romantics that believe conditions in the countryside in the past were very pleasant.
A Customer
This is a must read for every economist.
Maxim Masiutin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

45 of 50 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 30, 1999
Format: Paperback
Two centuries ago, Adam Smith explained the modern free-market economy. More than that, he discusses the need for, advantages of, and limitations of a free markets.
The introduction in this printing is especially good. Almost a book in itself, it extend for 50 pages and connects the book to other philosophers and economists. Almost, you don't need to read the book after you've read the introduction -- but do it anyway, just to be amazed at Smith's prescience.
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37 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Dana Hill on February 4, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My review does not concern the content. Rather, I just wish to point out that the Modern Library edition is complete and unabridged in one volume (over a thousand pages) for less money than the Penguin edition. Also the Modern Library edition has helpful glosses that summarize each paragraph. Plus, for those with a preference, the Modern Library edition has footnotes instead of endnotes.

Just a heads up.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Zeldock on January 11, 2009
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I don't need to point out that "The Wealth of Nations" (TWON) is a landmark work in economics. However, if you're looking for a Kindle version of TWON, be aware that this book (the Penguin edition on Kindle) contains ONLY Books IV and V of TWON. Penguin published Books I-III separately, and for some reason that volume is not yet available in a Kindle format. (At least, I couldn't find it as of Jan. 11, 2009.) I would therefore suggest trying another publisher until Penguin makes all of TWON available in Kindle format.
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53 of 70 people found the following review helpful By Rodney J. Szasz on July 24, 2002
Format: Paperback
This Book is a classic. I would not go so far as to add it to the western Canon, but it contains the foundations of modern Economics. Its explaination for how economies work is still unsurpassed. Division of Labour, the invisible hand of consumer demand and the uses and mis-uses of taxation are all here. It should be stressed however, that this edition does not include books IV and V which concern the proper role of govt. It is also the section most ideologues forget to read and contains all the rudiments for a minimal welfare state and and active role for govt. in planning FOR competition, NOT the planning OF competition --- a very important distinction and one lost on those who see no positive role for the state in the economy.
It is unfortunately most used as a classic for those seeking a rationale for exploitation. Smith did not intend it as such and to see it as that is indeed to read it very selectively. The invisible hand is a useful interpretation for demand economics, but it is, like all other things only a description of market forces as they operate. It is not always the best way to organise everything as modern day ideologues would presuppose. It is of course the basis of business --- and it should be --- but Smith also has lots to say about how other economic factors operate in society.
One thing to make clear is this: Smith is not anti-State, as some ideologues in the US would like to think. He is balanced in his view of the state --- it is best left out of economic planning --- but it does clearly have an important role to play. The role of the State is to
1) create the conditions for the smooth flow of capital and its allocation into its most efficient uses and not to erect barriers in the process.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Yoda on September 21, 2007
Format: Paperback
The first three "books" (the term for "chapters" in Smith's age) of the Wealth of Nations are the most important of the book. The introductory essay by the Smithologist Skinner also provides great insight into the book per se, Adam Smith and how Wealth of Nations fits into Smith's other works. This is despite the fact that it is only about 70 pages long. THis essay is much more enlightening than many books on either Smith or the Wealth of Nations. The price of the book is worth that essay alone.
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16 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Maxim Masiutin on December 7, 2008
Format: Paperback
This book is so widely cited and interpreted contrary to the author's original thought, that every economist should read it completely to avoid being misled by such incorrect interpretations.

First, let us take the "invisible hand" metaphor. When I have studied economy in the University, I was taught that almost the entire book is devoted to the "invisible hand" which means "self-corrective markets", "liberalism", "Laissez-faire" and "state non-intervention". After reading this book, I have found out that Adam Smith did use the term "invisible hand" only once in the entire book, in the discussion of domestic versus foreign trade.

To illustrate the point, let me quote the text where term "invisible hand" is used: "First, every individual endeavours to employ his capital as near home as he can, and consequently as much as he can in the support of domestic industry, provided always that he can thereby obtain the ordinary, or not a great deal less than the ordinary profits of stock. Thus, upon equal, or nearly equal profits, every wholesale merchant naturally prefers the home trade to the foreign trade of consumption, and the foreign trade of consumption to the carrying trade. In the home trade, his capital is never so long out of his sight as it frequently is in the foreign trade of consumption. [...]Secondly, every individual who employs his capital in the support of domestic industry, necessarily endeavours so to direct that industry, that its produce may be of the greatest possible value. [...
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