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The Wednesday Letters Hardcover – September 12, 2007


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Shadow Mountain; 1 edition (September 12, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590388127
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590388129
  • Product Dimensions: 1.4 x 6.1 x 7.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (249 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #596,943 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In the wake of his bestselling Christmas Jars comes a sweetly crafted story from Wright, a Virginia businessman. Jack and Laurel Cooper are two hardworking, loving Christian pillars of the community who die in each other's arms one night in the bed-and-breakfast that they own and operate. The event calls their three grown children home for the funeral, including their youngest son, a fugitive from the law who must face an outstanding warrant for his arrest and confront his one true love, now engaged to another man. As events unfold around the funeral, the three children discover a treasure trove of family history in the form of Wednesday letters-notes that Jack wrote to his wife every single week of their married lives. As they read, the children brush across the fabric of a devoted marriage that survived a devastating event kept secret all these years. It's a lovely story: heartening, wholesome, humorous, suspenseful and redemptive. It resonates with the true meaning of family and the life-healing power of forgiveness all wrapped up in a satisfying ending. (Oct.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

“A lovely story: heartening, wholesome, humorous,suspenseful, and redemptive. It resonates with the true meaning of family and the life-healing power of forgiveness all wrapped up in a satisfying ending.”—Publishers Weekly

“Romance and magic still live!”—Glenn Beck, talk-radio and CNN host

“Jason’s ability to write compelling fiction is a gift. I am of course writing a letter to my wife of 44 years on Wednesday.”—Kieth Merrill, Academy Award-winning film director

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Jason Wright is a New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and USAToday bestselling author.

He is the author of The James Miracle (2004); Christmas Jars (2005); The Wednesday Letters (2007); Recovering Charles (2008), Christmas Jars Reunion (2009); Penny's Christmas Jar Miracle (2009); The Cross Gardener (2010); The Seventeen Second Miracle (2010); The Wedding Letters (2011); and The 13th Day of Christmas (2012).

Articles by Jason have appeared in over 50 newspapers and magazines across the United States including The Washington Times, The Chicago Tribune, and Forbes. He has been seen on FoxNews, CNN, CSPAN and on many local and national radio shows.

Jason is also a popular speaker who speaks to over 100,000 annually on topics ranging from the value of service, the joy of failure, the lost art of letter writing and many other topics.

He lives with his wife, Kodi, and their four children in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia.

Customer Reviews

Very good, easy read.
Michelle Lynch
Toward the end of the book, a specific event was just a touch too much, a bit unbelievable.
T. Millan
This Story is a book you won't want to put down until you finished reading it.
ANewDay4Me

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

74 of 83 people found the following review helpful By Sandra Denton on September 14, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Do yourself a favor: skip the celeb-gossip books that are bombarding the amazon top ten list, and go straight for The Wednesday Letters by Jason Wright, A Beautiful Bucket of Bones by M. Luci, and Mother Theresa: Come Be My Light. If you refuse your voyeur instincts, you will turn to these novels and find the rewarding feelings of love and hope that all three so graciously inspire.

The Wednesday Letters is a classic American story filled with dreams and the struggles that surround them. A happily married couple, the Coopers, die in each others arms after a life of hard work, faith and love. Their children return for their funeral and find letters that not only show them the secrets of the lives they thought they knew, but guide them to the point of self-discovery, acceptance, and peace. It is a heartwarming story that will satisfy anyone who has ever had a dream and has had to find a way to move along when that dream dies.
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30 of 33 people found the following review helpful By K. Byrd on February 21, 2010
Format: Paperback
I read this book because it was recommended to me as an inspiring book with an unusual twist. It ended up inspiring me to throw it across the room. I really disliked this book.

SPOILER ALERT: Don't read if you don't want to know.

First, let me say that I am a Christian so the pro-life parts of the book were appreciated by me. I also find the theme of forgiveness a wonderful one to explore in the context of a rape. The premise of family secrets being revealed through the weekly letters was an intriguing idea. Alas, everything else about this book was completely preposterous. I believe in the power of forgiveness but one can forgive without embracing the offender as part of your life. I'm certainly not going to make my RAPIST my pastor. And, wow, how many plot resolutions can you have in one night: the quickie resolution of Matthew's troubled marriage along with his wife's surprise announcement; "Mr. Tweed" , the man Malcolm beat up, shows up after the funeral with a sudden, inexplicable case of remorse after two years with his surprise announcement; Malcom learns that dear 'ol bio dad - the man who raped his mom - is, in fact, the pastor of the church and he is okay with that. We learn that Mom and Pop forgave him ( which is good ) and then HELPED him get his job as a pastor and helped overcome other people's reservations about his appointment. Yeah, right.... What's next.... let's hire the pedophile as the youth minister? I was okay with the forgiveness part but it all seemed highly, ridiculously unlikely as were all of the resolutions occurring in one single night.

The characters weren't well developed either. I didn't get any sense of any real grief at losing both parents. There was very little personality development.
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35 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Danielle Funk on September 12, 2007
Format: Hardcover
What a great book. It made me laugh and cry. The relationship within the family was so realistic and believable to anyone that has siblings. I loved the local landmarks and the pride of living in a small town. The ending was so shocking and unexpected I had to read the last two chapters over again to really believe it. Sit down and be prepared to enjoy a really fabulous book!
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By L. Fedele on December 11, 2009
Format: Paperback
I just read this book for a book club, which is the only reason I made it through. There might be the bones of a story here, and if a good writer had gotten their hands on it, it could have fallen short of exasperating. (Where's John Irving when you need him?)

Any English teacher would have sent Mr. Wright back to the drawing board, explaining that throwing unnecessary, ham-fisted adjectives into the text is no substitute for actually developing characters or settings in a novel.

The three adult children who discover their dead parents' past through reading old letters are nearly as flat and cartoonish as the silent deceased themselves. Don't expect to understand anyone's motivations. Don't expect to understand why some people pop into the story and disappear again. Don't expect that plot points will turn out to mean anything. And don't expect to actually feel anything for anyone, even through the revelation of ostensibly deep family secrets.

Don't look for more than you'd get from watching a Lifetime movie.
In short, just don't.

If I could return this book to make the sales number drop by one, I would. If only I hadn't scrawled "WHY???" in half the pages' margins...
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23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Long Ago on July 25, 2008
Format: Hardcover
The first chapter started the story off with real power. It evokes a strong emotional response. And the latter half of the story also had some very poignant and emotional scenes; the type that put a tear in the eye and a lump in the throat. The story in its entirety was overall quite good, and the quality and emotion of the second half of the story helped make up for some not-so-subtle weaknesses.

After the powerful first chapter, as the Cooper siblings were introduced into the story, the story seemed to struggle to find its direction. Most obvious - and even irritating - to me was the dialogue between the siblings early on in the story. It seemed artificial and ingenuine. Not to mention they seemed to lack adequate development, with maybe the exception of Malcolm. Also, there were parts of the story that were very much over-written, as if the author was trying too hard to illustrate an environment, a character or a circumstance. Unfortunately, this caused some sections to just be hokey, goofy, and even a bit pathetic.

However, I thought in the second half the author seemed to find his stride and ended the book strongly. In the final assessment this was a good story, but it suffers 3 stars for a weak front half, except the first chapter.
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