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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good place to start
This book is just the tip of the ice berg when it comes to Werewolf lore and legend. For those curious about Werewolves and where the legend comes from I would recommend this book as a starting point of your search(as it allows you to see the different aspects of the Werewolf), but not as a solid reference book as most of the information is short, only two pages long for...
Published on September 2, 2011 by M Casteen

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars nice book
i thought this book was pretty awesome but, it didn't tell enough about werewolves in general. i mean, they tell what is a werewolf and then BAM! it just tells u the types of werewolves. do i care about the types? i wanna know more about werewolves in general.
Published on July 16, 2012 by the snowman


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good place to start, September 2, 2011
This review is from: The Werewolf Handbook: An Essential Guide to Werewolves and, More Importantly, How to Avoid Them (Hardcover)
This book is just the tip of the ice berg when it comes to Werewolf lore and legend. For those curious about Werewolves and where the legend comes from I would recommend this book as a starting point of your search(as it allows you to see the different aspects of the Werewolf), but not as a solid reference book as most of the information is short, only two pages long for most.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Useful book, May 23, 2013
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This review is from: The Werewolf Handbook: An Essential Guide to Werewolves and, More Importantly, How to Avoid Them (Hardcover)
This book is concise, compact, and very exact. It is filled with useful bits of trivia, folklore and history about werewolf lore but it is a lot more compact and likely for a younger reader than his other book on the subject of werewolves. The contact of this book helped me to win an Internet forum argument where someone refused to accept that the word Lycan was short for Lycanthrope and that it had it's origin of the Greek myth of king Lycaon, who, fortunately, gets a two and a half page mention here.

I recommend nearly all of Dr. Curran's books on folklore as reliable sources for research purposes except perhaps for his book on man made Monsters. He clearly wrote that one with only the most basic knowledge of the Frankenstein novel. In the chapter that directly speaks about Frankenstein he mistakenly believing that in Mary Shelley's novel the creature only learns a rudimentary form of language when in fact he was fluent in three languages and very articulate by the end of the novel.

So yes, this is one Dr. Curran's more useful books, just skip his book on Man Made Monsters. That one is a disappointment, particularly if you have actually read Frankenstein.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Fun Novelty Gift Book But Not Great for Serious Paranormal Buffs, August 30, 2013
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This review is from: The Werewolf Handbook: An Essential Guide to Werewolves and, More Importantly, How to Avoid Them (Hardcover)
This is a fun little gift book, which I kind of expected. There are nice color images, the layout is really pleasant to look at and the book shares all kinds of information although most of it is the stuff everyone knows from movies and pop culture. There are some interesting facts about various countries and cultures and their werewolf folklore. The table of contents is hidden by a creepy overlay (kind of like those kids books where they can open windows or doors to see things hidden underneath). Overall this book is a fun gift for anyone who is interested in horror movies or werewolves.

If you're looking for something more serious discussing folklore or paranormal topics related to werewolf/dogmen, then this is not a good choice. It's a fun, quick read with a pretty presentation but if you want real information skip this one. Look for something by Linda Godfrey or any of the case compilation style books in the paranormal genre.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fabulous book on Werewolves!, October 7, 2011
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This review is from: The Werewolf Handbook: An Essential Guide to Werewolves and, More Importantly, How to Avoid Them (Hardcover)
I ordered this book for my 12 year old son who loves wolves and werewolves of all kinds. He has thoroughly enjoyed reading and re-reading this book. He carries it with him to and from school and anywhere we go. It has inspired him towards truly being in character for Halloween! Many thanks for a happy son.
Sincerely,
A. Garrison
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5.0 out of 5 stars Werewolf Handbook is awesome, June 8, 2014
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We started Souther Horror Society and this book is great for reference to have discussions about the horror genre. In particular, the werewolf subcategory of the genre.
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5.0 out of 5 stars My Review, January 21, 2014
By 
Monica F (Fredericksburg, VA United States) - See all my reviews
A brief history of canine shape-shifters found across much of the globe starts this look into the world of the werewolf. Numerous historical figures can be said to be acquainted with werewolves, and a variety of werewolves are defined.

Narrative is crisp, authentic, and laced with humor. There are a few test your friends/etc for werewolfism tests which are fun.

Numerous historical and cinema stills are inserted throughout allowing for further depth to the text and potential reference to the time periods discussed.

Overall, a fun read!
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3.0 out of 5 stars nice book, July 16, 2012
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i thought this book was pretty awesome but, it didn't tell enough about werewolves in general. i mean, they tell what is a werewolf and then BAM! it just tells u the types of werewolves. do i care about the types? i wanna know more about werewolves in general.
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5.0 out of 5 stars book, January 7, 2014
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This review is from: The Werewolf Handbook: An Essential Guide to Werewolves and, More Importantly, How to Avoid Them (Hardcover)
I love to read book about creature of night and I love werewolves itself bye knowing the fax to know how to stay away from them while the human is in there wolf form because the wolf itself is dangerous
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4.0 out of 5 stars Werewolves, February 22, 2013
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This review is from: The Werewolf Handbook: An Essential Guide to Werewolves and, More Importantly, How to Avoid Them (Hardcover)
Good book and tells a lot. Gives a lot of history and stories, I just don't like how short/small it is. That's the only reason I gave it one less star. Also love the cover and pictures!
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8 of 14 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Very unreliable, better stay away from it, January 23, 2012
This review is from: The Werewolf Handbook: An Essential Guide to Werewolves and, More Importantly, How to Avoid Them (Hardcover)
I cannot recommend this book. It is not as though everything is wrong or it is badly written (well some parts are), but its validity is doubtful and I will only keep it as a reminder.
You cannot deny that it is often written and designed in a good way but this does not excuse for its flaws. Actually there are even design flaws as the author mixed pictures up and to be honest I have the suspicion that the author either made things up or is simply badly informed.
It might be possible that the author is right but even after the first 10 pages I noticed some oddities that should at least let anybody half-way knowledgeable in the field have raised eyebrows. Furthermore all in all it seems more fitting for fantasy fans then people actually interested in folklore and legend and there is doubt in my mind whether the author can identify what originated in folklore and what in pure fiction. Furthermore parts of this book are in contradiction with his previous werewolf book and I have my doubts that he has a definition of werewolf to begin with.
All in all, the biggest flaw is that the author does not name his sources unlike in his previous werewolf-book, which makes it very hard to know where he actually has it from and how valid his sources and/or his statements are.

BEWARE!!! MASSIVE SPOILER!!!

Considered that, according to his previous werewolf-book "Werewolves", the author has knowledge of the works of Elliot O'Donnell and Montague Summers it is weird that he simply describes werewolves as extremely savage, as though all of them were.
It might be possible that "man-wolf" originally meant a person who was strong and powerful but I can only say that because I also read it in an independent source.
The author states that Cú-Cuhullain might mean "Wolf of Ulster". This is however pretty new and even the Coir Anmann (which he later mentions) translates the word "Cú" with hound/dog and states the word "fáel" for wolf. He doesn't refer to that and didn't mention it in his previous werewolf book, in which he also translated the word "Cú" with hound/dog.
He does not state where he read that in folklore you can become a werewolf by being bitten, since this was an invention by the movie industry and especially O'Donnell clearly stated that werewolfism was not infectious, unlike vampirism.
Also I think it's questionable to say that someone transforming into a wolf by smearing herself with an ointment has no control as to when she becomes a wolf.
In addition, the ways of being born as a werewolf are not universal, e.g. Summers mentioned that children of Priests become werewolves as a belief in certain areas of France but that was it.
And it is not correct to say that wherever men are there are werewolves close by, since India has no indigenous stories of werewolves as far as I know, but it seems as though the author often simply means all sorts of shapeshifters when he talks of werewolves (or in other cases seems to exclude werewolves from shapeshifters), while in other cases shapeshifting is not even required, which made me question whether the author actually has a definition of the phenomenon.
And I wonder where he read it that the curse can be passed on by inhaling the smoke of a burning werewolf-body.
His exclusion of Eastern Europe from the countries with the most werewolf stories is incorrect in my eyes. Furthermore it is odd that he changes the subject so quickly to people turning into jackals, foxes and coyotes instead of at least mentioning tales of people turning into wolves from North America (he only mentions people transforming into coyotes). And while there might be stories of actual women transforming into foxes from Japan, the opposite is definitely far more common.
In addition, after talking of Northern and Western Europe, North Africa, North America, Middle East and Japan, his statement regarding that in other parts of the world "Magicians can often transform themselves into other animals, although these are invariably wild animals" is definitely incorrect and arguably inconsistent with his own book since he later tells of a "Werecat of Salem" and mentioned cases of people transforming into dogs in his previous werewolf book. Furthermore stories of people transforming into cats were common for medieval witches, and stories of sorcerers transforming into dogs are known from the Americas, to Africa and Indonesia.
Whether it is, like another commenter stated, incorrect that Finnish "magicians" shifted into bears I cannot say, but it is odd that the author chose Finland for that and not Sweden or Norway.
It is also odd that he only lists ways to spot a werewolf in human form and mostly ignores the signs telling you that the wolf in front of yourself might not be a wolf after all.
I have no idea where he has it from that werewolves will avoid silver and that all of them "will be nervous, even secretive, as the full moon approaches" since in many tales werewolves shifted in broad daylight and totally independent of the moon. I also doubt the source of the healing abilities. All in all he acts as though those signs are universal when in fact many tales exist where the people in question where only identified as werewolves when having been seen shifting shape or due to certain wounds. Had they had the signs he mentioned that would not have been necessary.

And I wouldn't call the "types of werewolf" he mentions as the most famous, I bet barely anybody heard of them, respectively his menagerie is a bit weird to say the least.
This particular chapter already starts with an introduction that makes it questionable whether the author has a definition of werewolf.
And if with the wolf-fearing ancestors he means those ape-like ancestors he talks about than he should do a course in basic paleontology, since by the time our ancestors probably first met gray wolves they already looked like us and not apes.
And based on the estimated age of the drawing known as "The sorcerer de Trois-Fréres" it is a bit premature to say that its tail is that of a wild wolf, since it could also have been a fox tail or that of a domestic dog who definitely was around in the time between 14000 and 8000 BC. In addition the creature with the dead rabbit depicted on page 20 is clearly a dog-men as evident by its dropped ears (perhaps he regards dogs correctly as wolves but then his earlier comment would no longer fit).
In addition, while it is true that some depictions show Cerberus as two-headed others portray him with three heads.
That he speaks about that "in the early medieval stories, sometimes a great knight might be accidentally transformed into a wolf" seems to suggest that he means the story of Melion, which was not a legend or folklore but definitely a work of pure fiction.
He forgets to mention that many among the clerics stated that the transformation of man to wolf was not real but merely an illusion caused by the devil.
His entry on Le Maitre de Foret (or simply Master of the Forest [you don't need French to guess that]) clearly describes a being that controls wolves and not something that is a werewolf itself, at least there is no mentioning of shapeshifting into a wolf. In addition in some sentences he indicates that this being might be inhuman in nature and therefore does not fit any definition of werewolf.
Especially odd is his chapter on "The Laignach Faelad". I have my doubts that stories about these "war wolves" respectively these warriors "who were said to be half men, half wolf" even exists and he doesn't say where he has it from. Sure he does mention this "extremely ancient Irish text known as the Coir Anmann" (which he also mentions in his previous werewolf book) but not where he read about it and who/what was the source for that text. If it really is so ancient it would not be something just anybody could get access to and from what I know, Curran has a doctorate in educational psychology and not history or literature or any field that is actually related to the topic and might grant him access.
Well since he doesn't really say where he has it from it is hard if not impossible to say whether he made it up or had false information.
But I can say this:
I searched for this title and found the title "Cóir Anmann: A late Middle Irish treatise on personal names" edited by Sharon Arbuchnoc. The first part was published in 2005 and the second one in 2007. Furthermore the first book states that there were three of them all contained in Arbuchnoc's work.
The scribe of the original first Cóir Anmann (CA) was Ádhamh Ó Cianáin who died in 1373. He was copying from an exemplar belonging to or written by his teacher and most of the manuscript appears to have been written before 1345 (possible 1344), making it 'the earliest surviving compilation of traditional material after the Book of Leinster'. Five complete copies and one fragment of the second CA have survived and none are older than the late fourteenth century. And three copies of the third CA have survived, all not older than the sixteenth century. So all in all not exactly "extremely ancient". But based on Curran's previous book he seems to mean the third one.
But the actual relevant part is this:
In the second part of the book by Arbuchnoc (which contains the third CA) there is the following translated text;
Laignech Fáelad [<fáel 'wolf'], i.e. he was a man who used to engage in 'wolfing', i.e. he used to change into wolf-forms, i.e. into the forms of wolves, whenever he wanted, and so did his descendents after him. And they used to kill cattle in the manner of wolves. For that reason he used to be called Laignech Fáelad. For he was the first of them to change into the form of a wolf.
This is basically the same description that Montague Summers had in his book "Werewolf" (which according to his previous werewolf book the author knew about and had read). He further added the sentence "This was in Ossory". As his sources he lists "Irische Texte" by Whitley Stokes and Ernst Windisch (a version of the CA which Arbuchnoc also mentions in her book as being an earlier translation with some notes) and "The Irish version of the Historia Britonum of Nennius." William Camden is mentioned in the book but I could find nothing of Tipperary (because Curran refers to the as "Wolf Men of Tipperary").
But I did find a reference to Tipperary in the book "Metamorphoses of the Werewolf" albeit only referring to the "Tipperary border". Nonetheless in the book it is stated that the "De Ingantaib Érenn (On the wonders of Ireland) ... identifies the werewolves 'as the descendents of Laignech Fáelad in Ossory". It also identifies Fáelad as a person, not a group of people.
Now Wikipedia mentions Ossory as the anglicized version of the Kingdom of Osraighe and that it "was an ancient kingdom of Ireland. It formed the easternmost part of the kingdom and province of Munster until the middle of the 9th century, after which it attached itself to Leinster." And it further states that County of Tipperary is today located in Munster, so it's possible that "Ossory" and "Tipperary" mean the same location in this case.
Now the Eigi Einhamr are clearly not werewolves but rather a term for shapeshifters in general, which Curran's text itself states but nonetheless classifies as werewolves.
While Loup Garou is a term for a werewolf in France this entry makes me question when in the eyes of the author a story stops being about a werewolf. He says himself that the Rougarou sometimes acts more like a vampire (a mixture of both is already noted from some parts of Europe) but fails to mention that in some versions only a witch can make a Rougarou or that in others it's a headless horsemen, despite the fact that such information is easily accessible. In addition he fails to mention that it is debatable whether the Rugaru legend of the Ojibwa really originated among them.
Now his chapter on the Benandanti seems to lack any source. At first the author writing about them is called Ginzburg and not Ginzberg as Curran did. In addition if Curran is referring to his book "The Night Battles" (if not it's hard to say which one he means since Ginzburg wrote many books) I can only say that the book neither states that the mentioned man called Thiess was a Benandanti nor that the Benandanti transformed their souls into wolf-shapes. Bourgault mentioned this in her book "The Curse of the Werewolf" but the referenced article by Ginzburg she stated did not state this either. I know of three books in which Ginzburg mentions these people and in none of them does he claim that they were werewolves.
Now after only 7 chapters (aka 14 pages) the author already refers to other shapeshifters on page 34 which he does not label as werewolf, for some unknown reason since he had no problem with that in the case of the E igi Einhamr or the Master of the Forest. Furthermore the "Man-bear monster" on this page is not a bear but a dog-head from the well known Nuremberg Chronicle (can be found here: [...]%27sche_Weltchronik-Dog_head.jpg).

Also his werewolf tales are not really famous and not really all werewolf-tales when you look at it.
Lycaon did not live before the flood of the Bible but before the flood in Greek myth (which features Deukalyon and not Noah, and had followed a big fire). He also does not state (typical) that there are different myths about Lycaon and his trial by Zeus, in some Lycaon was a just man and his sons cruel and transformed and in others they were killed by lightning and not transformed into wolves. I also wonder what his source for the nine years period of transformation for Lycaon is. This is also not really a story about Lycaon but rather about these Arcadian werewolf myths.
Out of some reason he assessed Romulus and Remus as werewolves and I think the myth of the Arcadian boxer actually refers to him having been a wolf for a time and not being raised by one.
St. Christopher is not a werewolf but a dog-head, as Curran himself states, but that he lacked the power of shapeshifting didn't seem to bother him.
Peter Stubbe was from Bedburg, not Bedbur, and he was accused of much more than the book stated.
The pictures he used in Gilles Garnier's story have nothing to do with the case. Neither do the ones of the Gandillion family or in the chapter of Pierre de Lancre and Henri Boguet.
And the picture on page 60 is a colored version of a picture from the Nuremberg Chronicle and doesn't show the burning of werewolves but a burning of Jews. The pictures from the chapter of Jean Grenier have nothing to do with him and the one on page 66 & 67 belongs to the wolf of Ansbach (on page 70) as is evident by the background picture in the picture itself (it shows a miniature version of the picture on page 70).
He also does not mention that some people believed that the wolf of Ansbach was not the ghost of the deceased major but a common wolf or a wolf possessed by the devil.
Susanna Martin, as previously stated, is a direct contradiction regarding his statement that magicians never turn into non-wild animals. In addition the picture on page 74 is definitely a canine as evident by the long snout and the body shape, but he claimed it to be a werecat, despite the fact that it is a very prominent werewolf-picture.
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