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The What Would Jesus Eat Cookbook Spiral-bound – August 6, 2002


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Product Details

  • Spiral-bound: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson (August 6, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785265198
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785265191
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 6.6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #852,460 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Don Colbert, M.D., a board-certified family practitioner since 1984, is the author of such bestsellers as What Would Jesus Eat?, Toxic Relief, Walking in Divine Health, and the Bible Cure Booklet Series. Dr. Colbert has developed his own vitamin line, Divine Health Nutritional Products, and hosts the national talk show, Your Health Matters, with his wife Mary. He regularly speaks at national seminars. He makes his home in central Florida.

More About the Author

Don Colbert, MD, is board-certified in family practice and anti-aging medicine and has helped millions of people to discover the joy of living in divine health. He is the author of numerous books, including the New York Times best seller The Seven Pillars of Health.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Jesus wouldn't have eaten canned fruit or veggies!
Proverbs 31 Woman
Read the book, What Would Jesus Eat, but don't waste your time or money on the cookbook.
"chasehim"
I received it in a timely manner and with the book just as described.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

141 of 145 people found the following review helpful By Lisa P. Milheim on August 11, 2002
Format: Spiral-bound Verified Purchase
After reading "What Would Jesus Eat?", I expected good things from the "What Would Jesus Eat Cook Book." Alas, I was disappointed.
To begin with, I agree completely with the premise of "What Would Jesus Eat?"--that the Levitical dietary laws were provided for health reasons and that they are completely relevant for today (they do not return the Christian to a 'yoke of bondage' as some reviewers have charged). In that book (if you have not yet read it), Dr. Colbert discusses what the Bible says, or indicates, about various foods of Bible times and supplements it with some modern medical knowledge about the dietary scene of today; specifically he addresses the hazards of the typical American diet and offers alternatives to notoriously "bad" foods as well as practical advice on how to change poor eating and health habits. Although I had a dissatisfied sense that his book could have gone into much more detail than it did, it was generally informative.
However, when I opened up the companion Cook Book, I immediately began to have questions. Now, if you have never used a "health food" or "natural food" cook book, and you have spent your life up until now eating Doritos & TV Dinners, this book could serve as a good start. But if you're a "veteran" of any stripe of the health food scene, you're going to gasp at some of the items that go into these recipes--for example: butter (4 sticks for the Baklava!), sour & heavy cream, low sodium "boullion granules", canned tomatoes, canned fruit, canned broth, canned tomato sauce and genetically modified ("seedless") grapes.
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48 of 53 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 16, 2004
Format: Spiral-bound
Having previously read What Would Jesus Eat?, promoting only whole foods and whole grains only, avoiding sugar and processed foods, this cookbook is a disappointing contradiction.
The editorial reads: "These easy-to-follow recipes are designed to help the reader prepare foods commonly eaten during the time of Christ in a way that will satisfy modern-day palates. Dishes feature fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes, fish, olive oil and more..."
Many of the ingredients listed in the recipes that were not recommended in the What Would Jesus Eat? book would not have been consumed by Christ, such as:
- Italian bread
- French bread
- Phyllo pastry
- Stuffing mix
- Baking mix
- Pasta (not listed as whole grain)
- Bread crumbs (not listed as whole grain)
- White sugar
- Confectioners sugar
- Brown sugar
- Maple syrup
- Mayonnaise
- Ketchup
- Soy sauce
- Peanut butter
- Tabasco
- Heavy cream
- Canned fruit, vegetables and beans
- Canned broth
Save your money and stick to the basics...eat healthier, more fruits and veggies, whole grain breads and cereals, and use olive oil in cooking all the time! Skip the junk food and choose healthy fast food items and you'll do just fine!
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60 of 69 people found the following review helpful By "chasehim" on October 23, 2002
Format: Spiral-bound
Read the book, What Would Jesus Eat, but don't waste your time or money on the cookbook. The book contains great common sense and Biblical reasoning for correcting the way we as Americans eat, and it includes plenty of recipes and instructions for changing your eating habits. The cookbook was very disappointing and isn't in the same league as the book.
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29 of 34 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 27, 2003
Format: Spiral-bound
Finally, a healthy cookbook with simple easy recipes. I've collected several healthy cookbooks that I like a lot, but they always have a ton of really expensive hard to find ingredients. It was nice to finally read a cookbook with great recipes that a busy mom of 4 can make with only a trip to a total of one or two different markets. If you don't have time to hunt for hard to find ingredients,but you still want to feed your family the healthy way, then this may be just what you're looking for.
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33 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Charlene Vickers on August 16, 2005
Format: Spiral-bound
One of the challenges Don Colbert faced in writing the What Would Jesus Eat Cookbook is whether the book should focus on the foods Jesus did eat in Judea 2000 years ago or on the foods Jesus would eat were He transported to 21st century America. Colbert doesn't seem to have decided which way he wanted to go, possibly because he doesn't quite seem to understand where he was coming from.

A great deal of controversy has been stirred up by Colbert's claims that following the Mosaic laws is healthier than following the standard Western diet. Colbert does not claim that the laws forbidding the consumption of pork, seafood and other foods and food combinations still apply; his premise is simply that following the dietary laws that Jesus did, and eating the foods He would have eaten during His lifetime, is healthier than following our modern diet. However, this premise is undercut by the inclusion of ingredients in well over half the recipes which are completely foreign to the ancient Mediterranean. No Judean (or Roman, for that matter) would have recognized New World foods such as tomatoes, potatoes, hot peppers, and squash or Far Eastern foods such as edameme and soy sauce, yet one or more of these ingredients can be found in over half the recipes. What's more, many of the foods and condiments enjoyed in the Holy Land at the time - fish sauce, lovage, wild mushrooms, and above all wine (note: not grape juice, alcoholic WINE) - are never mentioned, let alone included in a recipe.

But the main criticism I have of this book is its premise. Colbert seems to subscribe to the idea that ancient people were somehow healthier than we moderns, and that our poor diet is the main reason. This is, to be blunt, absolutely false.
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