The White Hairs and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$13.49
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.99
  • Save: $1.50 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The White Hairs Paperback – July 19, 2010


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.49
$13.48 $17.13
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New Adult Fiction by Rainbow Rowell
Acclaimed author Rainbow Rowell's latest book, Landline, offers a poignant, humorous look at relationships and marriage. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 120 pages
  • Publisher: lulu.com (July 19, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0557482844
  • ISBN-13: 978-0557482849
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,384,522 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Reminiscent of Paulo Coehlo's The Alchemist, The White Hairs is a thoughtful book that flows at a slow, soft, meditative pace. The jury unanimously approves"
--thescattering.wordpress.com/

"It reminds me of a quote my friend Lucinda Williams wrote on her cd: 'You do not know what wars are going on where the spirit meets the bone'....Magical book" --Steve Balderson (Director of Firecracker)

"A sci-fi tale of good and evil...helpful for people who have been damaged by life and want to find hope and joy." --Sullivan County Democrat

About the Author

Noah Mullette-Gillman was born in Montclair, New Jersey. He spent his childhood there, as well as in the town of Manly, Australia, and the woods of Upstate New York. He earned a multidisciplinary degree in Philosophy and Creative Writing at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York.
His favorite color is blue.
His favorite number is 8.
His favorite song is currently Moment of Surrender.
He thinks better and more clearly as the day goes on, arguably climbing to his intellectual summit in the middle of the night, when the world has gone to sleep and he can think without any interfering broadcasts from other brains.
--Noah K Mullette-Gillman

Cover paintings by Dana Black

More About the Author

Noah Mullette-Gillman was born in Montclair, New Jersey. He spent his childhood there, as well as in the town of Manly, Australia, and the woods of Upstate New York. He earned a multidisciplinary degree in Philosophy and Creative Writing at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York.
His favorite color is blue.
His favorite number is 8.
His favorite song is currently Moment of Surrender.
He thinks better and more clearly as the day goes on, arguably climbing to his intellectual summit in the middle of the night, when the world has gone to sleep and he can think without any interfering broadcasts from other brains.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
11
4 star
7
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 19 customer reviews
I look forward to seeing more from this author.
Guardians of Godzuki
I recommend reading the sample before purchasing the book.
Richard E. Jackson
I found the imagery beautiful and the story flowed well.
Ubiquitin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Guardians of Godzuki on June 29, 2010
Format: Paperback
Mr. Mullete-Gillman's first widely published work opens many fascinating doors and does not content itself to leave conventional tidy endings. Much is left for the reader to interpret in his or her own way, a risk that here pays off. The author embraces the mystical "pilgrimage" traditions of the old tales, both Western and Eastern, which leave the reader (or listener) to take away lessons or thoughts to apply to their own journey through life.

I look forward to seeing more from this author. Recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By JOA on September 21, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition
Rating: 4.1 out of 5

A couple reviews ago I spent some time describing stories and their ideas and how sometimes the potency of one doesn't match the other. However, one type I failed to list are the tales whose ideas are fully fleshed out, meaty, and beautiful, yet whose writing lags a bit behind. For a perfect example of this, I can point to "Atlas Shrugged" or "The Fountainhead" by Ayn Rand. These are two books whose concepts are striking in their completion, yet the function and form of the stories don't quite measure up. In instances such as these, the lack of literary prowess is easily ignored - at least by this reviewer - for it is what they have to say that is important.

I found myself thinking of these types of tales while reading "The White Hairs", a novella of surprising depth by author Noah Mullette-Gillman. Within is presented the story of Farshoul, a yeti-like creature who lives in the icy mountaintop regions of some unnamed place in some unnamed (though somewhat modern) time. He and his people have lived atop these mountains for centuries, isolated from the human race. They are an unexpectedly sophisticated race of beings, seemingly more advanced than man in terms of intellect and spiritual understanding. As is their right of passage, these White Hairs, as they're called, "travel" - or astral project - to both further their understanding of the nature of their souls and help to strengthen their sense of community. It is here, during one of these traveling ceremonies, that we first meet Farshoul.

Farshoul has a different experience than his brethren. Whereas they dance about and interact with each other while away from their bodies, he can see none of them.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on June 28, 2010
Format: Paperback
I enjoyed this quick novel's mix of spiritual questions and answers. The protagonist does his best in a world where enlightenment reveals but leaves scars. Those who are the most certain may have the least vision.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Kippoe VINE VOICE on July 27, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition
A few books come along that you read and then pick up and read again, this is one of those books. A book i will return to many times, it captures the magic and adventure that all story tellers try to achieve. with elements of mystical creatures and the gift of Out of Body Experience.

Masterfully written with details that put you right into the story that takes you on this spiritual journey. I can't wait to see more from this author
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Math Puppy on July 18, 2010
Format: Paperback
The White Hairs is a profound and powerful read, an engaging and emotional parable that lingers in the mind long after the last page has been turned.

Mullette-Gillman's writing is spare yet deceptively intricate, weaving a tale of spiritual discovery that is at once otherworldly but heartfelt. As readers we follow the Yeti-like Farshoul and the far-ranging adventures of his soul, from exploration to exultation, from joy to fury to a cold indifference perhaps worse than death.

With Farshoul we travel tremendous distances in time and space, between gods and monsters, amongst mortal men and the mysterious White Hairs themselves. Will Farshoul finally descend into despair or redemption, a final disengagement or an ultimate enlightenment?

I won't spoil any endings as this is a journey all readers should take through the pages of Mullette-Gillman's fine work. Let this author's exquisite imagination lead your spirit, perhaps reflecting the quest of your own soul in the trials of this enduring creature.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By F. N. on July 13, 2010
Format: Paperback
The White Hairs opens with an astral walk through the ether that eventually leads the main character to disillusionment and rejection of his society. More importantly, it results in his own self-abandonment as parts of his soul are literally ripped out and never come back, leaving him empty, emotionless, and unable to feel the joy of life after the third and final walk ends in a battle with a hellhound for his own soul.

The writing style throughout is smooth, evenly-paced, and easy to read. The only difficulty I found was the font face, which was initially a bit difficult to focus my eyes on, but that disappeared quickly as the narrative took hold. Despite a detailed description of a ritualized killing, which is explained as being necessary only "every so often," the story doesn't explain how the larger than human-sized creatures could survive deep in snow-covered mountains with little vegetation. Farshoul's mother enters, and leaves, the story but a father is never mentioned, and little is made of how the society in general functions. There is also a seemingly anachronistic descriptions of machinery and handguns when Farshoul himself is apparently not familiar with the human world at all outside of the ancient stone walls near his home. Yet none of these minor points detract from the main narrative flow, which is essentially the spiritual journey of a single character isolated from others of his kind.

While reading the descriptions of the world which Farshoul inhabits, I couldn't help picturing the images from Hayao Miyazaki's classic "Shuna no tabi" (The Journey of Shuna).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search