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The Whole Grain Cookbook Paperback – August 1, 2000

4.1 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Grain truly is the staff of life - tasty, versatile, and highly nutritious. From the familiar oat to exotic ancient crops, The Whole Grain Cookbook is a celebration of the good eating offered by grains. These authentic, eclectic, homespun recipes show the various grains at their best, whether on their own or cooked with vegetables or meat.Rediscover the goodness of barley, oats, and corn in such recipes as Turkish Barley and Yogurt Soup, Applejack Oat Cake, and Pozole. Enjoy the marvelous flavors of newly available ancient grains such as amaranth and quinoa, first grown by the Aztecs and Incas. Taste the diverse possibilities of rice in recipes ranging from Balinese Pancakes to Azerbaijani Rice Pilaf to Norwegian Rice and Almond Pudding. This wonderfully inclusive cookbook also has tempting recipes for chickpeas, beans, buckwheat, spelt, nuts, seeds - and even acorns.Also included is information on where to buy whole grain, how to store it, and how to grind your own meal and flour with a home-milling machine (as with coffee and pepper, freshly ground grains are more flavorful, and less expensive, than store-bought). Appetizing, informative, and uncomplicated, The Whole Grain Cookbook is a resource you'll return to again and again. (7 X 91/4, 320 pages)

About the Author

A. D. Livingston is the author of more than a dozen cookbooks, including Sausage, On the Grill, and Cast-Iron Cooking. He writes a regular column for Gray's Sporting Journal.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Lyons Press; 1st edition (August 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1585740470
  • ISBN-13: 978-1585740475
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 7 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,799,278 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on September 23, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book contains interesting and informative information about just about every grain plus some legumes, nuts, and seeds. The only problem I have with this book is that it seems that the recipes were not tested. The first two recipes I tried did not work they way there were written which makes me hesitant to try any others. Another thing that makes me feel that perhaps these weren't tested is that there are no recipes yields so you don't know how many of a cookie your making or how many servings a recipe will make.
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Format: Paperback
Many folks know that eating whole grains is better than eating the processed stuff you get at the grocery story. The problem is, there are relatively few cookbooks for using some of the more "exotic" grains.
This cookbook gives you recipes for more than 20 different grains, seeds and nuts. The recipes go way beyond bread, and encompass the globe. You'll find things like Millet Soufflé, Duck Soup with Barley, Sopa de Avena (Oatmeal Soup), and Gingersnaps (made with whole berry wheat flour). Most of the ingredients are easily obtainable, especially if you have access to a good health food store.
The author does a fair job of giving lots of sources for buying some of the less common grains. Websites would be helpful, but I can understand why he would not include them (since web addresses change all the time). A bit of time spent online can put you in contact with any number of suppliers.
I would have appreciated more time spent on the section for grinding your own grain. There are a number of home grain mills on the market, and it would have been nice if he had taken some time and discussed the pros and cons of various mills.
While cooking with whole grains is part of a healthier lifestyle, this is not a health-food cookbook, nor is it vegetarian. There are meatless recipes, and there are low-fat recipes, but that isn't the point of this book. Livingston is introducing the reader to a vast array of grains and ways to prepare them.
Since the recipes aren't any more difficult to prepare than recipes from any average cookbook, the hardest thing will be finding the grains; head to your local health food store. Even some large supermarkets are stocking small packages of whole grains in their health food/organic aisles.
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Format: Paperback
I was looking for a user friendly whole grain cookbook. I was disappointed in this one. A lot of the recipes are on the "weird" side or use hard to get ingredients. For instance there is a recipe for Amaranth Pancakes which calls for acorn flour. Where do you find acorn flour--not a staple in my cupboard.

I think there are better choices when looking for a whole grain cookbook.
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Format: Paperback
In one of the first recipes he uses a mixture of amaranth, barley and acorn flour and says that you can use anything to replace the acorn flour, such as flax seed,etc. That's the only time that the author uses a "weird" ingredient. And actually acorns are everywhere and he tells you how to process them if you desire to add acorn flour to your pantry.

There is a section for every type of grain and the recipes start with recipes for that particular grain, such as Rice Croquettes, Boiled Millet, Oatmeal Pudding, Indonesian Crackers, etc. and then it will have a recipe or two for what you can do with the grain if it's ground into flour.

I like the book because I wanted to know what I could make with amaranth flour, or sorghum flour, etc. He/She has a recipe for flatbread using sorghum flour, Sorghum Chapatis, Amaranth Crepes with Bananas and Lemon Sauce, Buckwheat Blini's, Millet Pancakes, and Chickpea Fry bread with Pecans to name a few. I am trying to limit my consumption of wheat so this book fits my needs well. Of course it also covers Wheat, and Barley, etc.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
More than just a cook book. It is a book to be referred to often and one you can learn so much from. Well written. It provides a wide variety of grains plus ways to use them. A great read.
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