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The Whole Love

September 23, 2011 | Format: MP3

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: September 23, 2011
  • Release Date: September 23, 2011
  • Label: Anti/Epitaph
  • Copyright: 2011 dBpm Records, under exclusive license to Epitaph
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 56:21
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B005MVIF7M
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (89 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #18,848 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

The result, thus far, has been one of their best albums to date.
J. Loudon
The Whole Love is the perfect album if you're looking for something refreshing, or for anyone who's a fan of great songwriting.
Brian E.
One of the most consistent bands in rock & roll puts out another stellar album - their best since 2004's A Ghost is Born.
Jason Ford

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

93 of 109 people found the following review helpful By Brian E. on September 27, 2011
Format: Audio CD
Wilco is one of those bands you can never sleep on.

Nearly a decade removed from their most esteemed album, Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, circumstances have changed for the Chicago-based rockers. There was a time in which Wilco couldn't do anything without causing everyone to stand up and take notice.

My senior year in high school was the year A Ghost Is Born came out, and everyone was talking about that record. It was everywhere. You couldn't escape the buzz from that album if you bought real estate under a giant boulder.

But if you were one of those, like me, who soon tired of the Wilco hype, you eventually got your wish. It wouldn't be fair to say the hype died, but I don't remember the previous two albums generating the same level of hysteria we saw with Ghost.

But now it is 2011 and I've got to eat my words. I finally decided to give Wilco an in-depth listen, and I see what the big deal is. If there's a new wave of hype over the latest Wilco record, don't expect to see me run for cover. Because if there's any justice, The Whole Love should start a revolution of its own.

The Whole Love seems to strike a medium between the two extremes the band painted in the 2000s. It's certainly more level headed than Yankee Hotel Foxtrot and A Ghost is Born, but is more adventurous than their last effort, Wilco (the album). The opener, "Art of Almost," builds up slowly, leaving you wondering what exactly this album has in store for you. But when the extended guitar solo kicks in, you know you're in for a truly unique ride.

As a listener who appreciates variety, The Real Love is an easy sell. This album has it all, from sprawling epics to clashing rockers and well crafted pop nuggets.
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43 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Rudolph Klapper on September 27, 2011
Format: Audio CD
It would have been so easy for Wilco to just fade away. No one would have begrudged them any; Yankee Hotel Foxtrot still engenders enough goodwill in the music community ten years after its release that if Jeff Tweedy decided to spend the rest of his years writing paeans to fatherhood and singing sweet, insubstantial love songs with Feist, everyone would simply nod their heads and go along with it. But what Wilco has always done best is growth, from Being There's epic expansion of classic Americana to the unapologetic power pop of Summerteeth to A Ghost Is Born's startling abrasive rock classicism. Through it all the constant was Tweedy, suffering through a recurring painkiller medication and the woes of growing old, his biting lyricism continually well tempered with fine melodies culled from the best folk tradition, from Cash to Young to Bragg. Yet as a first single, "I Might" was disturbingly coy; for all the lyrics about parental discord and setting children on fire, it was fairly rote late-period Wilco. That is to say, boring and not particularly memorable. In the context of The Whole Love, however, it's one heck of a red herring. It's the most conventional song on here, an old-fashioned rock `n roll respite cleverly placed after the delightfully unconventional opener "Art of Almost." That is the song that sets out the mission statement of The Whole Love - an unassumingly complicated drumbeat propelling a foggy atmosphere of discordant electronics and haunting strings, Tweedy himself practically a ghost in the background, all the elements swirling around each other without falling apart.Read more ›
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22 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Red on Black TOP 1000 REVIEWER on September 27, 2011
Format: Audio CD
There is a danger when you try to satisfy everyone that you satisfy no one. Jeff Tweedy is keenly aware of this since in recent years Wilco has tended to polarize music fans who love their experimental side as evidenced on their masterpiece "Yankee Hotel Foxtrot" but are not overly keen on their gentle country rock side as evidenced by albums like "Sky blue sky". But in the world of Wilco the whole is the sum of the parts and in a remarkable career they have become the premier American band by refusing to be pigeonholed and being driven by a sense of sonic adventure. "The Whole Love" is their eighth full album and comes as a single album or a slightly longer special edition with 4 additional tracks. It essentially covers all Wilco bases with a mix of the experimental and traditional. This is most in evidence on the two best tracks which bookend the main album. First up is the powerful 7 minute plus opener "Art of the almost" made up of a wonderful cacophony of pulsing synths, propulsive beats and Nels Cline doing a great impression of Richie Blackmore. As a polar opposite the album concludes with the gorgeous twelve minute plus alt country acoustic epic "One Sunday Morning (Song For Jane Smiley's Boyfriend)" where not one second is wasted and which may be one of Tweedy's finest compositions ever. In between you get some of the best pop songs since Summerteeth and a fine balance between artsy, melodic and country. The single "I might" for example has a throbbing bass, a sub Doors style keyboard line and enough hooks to catch mackerel. Cline's injects the song with ragged guitar lines as Tweedy who is clearly enjoying himself intones that "It's all right/You won't set the kids on fire/But I might".Read more ›
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